TURN ON THE TEEVEE! CHAVEZ IS HILARIOUS!!

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Olberman?

Postby km artlu » Sun Sep 24, 2006 5:18 am

Hhmm...let's see, it's ok for Olberman to present a segment correlating elevated terror conditions with preceding political hits to Bushco. But not ok for him to be anything but towing the line regarding a potent gesture from Chavez.<br><br>So, having exposed himself in a gatekeeper/Mockingbird stance, he also indicates to us that there's room in their gameplan for running out some leash revealing the manipulative dynamics of the War on Terror.<br><br>But the line is drawn at granting any validity to the Bolivarian point of view. For that, the portcullis comes crashing down.<br><br>This is revealing something about what they truly fear. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Olberman?

Postby chiggerbit » Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:10 pm

Had the following email forwarded to me by a friend. This isn't the first annoying one she has sent, either. I don't know what's up with her.<br><br>Boycott CITGO<br><br><br><br>If you have even the slightest love for your country (and I've gotta believe most of us have loads of love for the USA), you will boycott CITGO gas stations immediately. That's right -- those innocent looking pumps, most often seen at 7-11 stores. They are conduits of cash for their owner -- Venezuelan madman, Hugo Chavez. <br><br>He's the guy who called our President a "Devil" -- and who made the sign of the cross and prayed for the quick demise of the United States. He did this in a ranting speech to the United Nations -- just yesterday -- September 20 -- on American soil. It gets worse. He has been made a kind of a cartoon superhero by much of our media. There's is such a strong anti-Bush sentiment among members of the media, they don't seem to understand that our country is being threatened. <br><br>Make no mistake, this guy is not some kind of clown. His tentacles are into everything, and he's out to harm this country -- our country-- but we can hurt him economically by boycotting his oil company -- CITGO. <br><br>Did you know, over 40% of his billions in revenue come from oil sold here in the US. We are his biggest customer (buying 14% of our oil from him). I won't go into the dependence on foreign oil discussion here -- that will require a long-term fix -- but boycotting CITGO is something we can all do right now!<br><br>I'm told that some people are actually buying exclusively at CITGO in order to send a message to President Bush. What message? "I hate my country?"<br><br>To them I say "Wake up! You are putting our country -- yourself and future generations -- in grave danger. " <br><br>Chavez uses the money from the US to work against US -- by sponsoring terrorism, financing anti-democracy causes, fomenting hatred for America, and propping up the failed Communist regime of Castro in Cuba. His aid to that country is larger than all aid to all other Latino countries. <br><br>He is a Communist who appears to want to take the reins of Castro when that aging dictator finally passes on. Plus, he's working with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad -- that other madman who wants atomic weapons. Imagine having that kind of threat as close as Venezuela -- or Cuba (90 miles off our coast).<br><br>Every time you buy CITGO gas, you contribute to this cause.<br><br>In this country, you have the right to feel any way you wish about our president, politics, etc. But we need to stand together when we are threatened by an outside element. <br><br>As Charles Rangel (D - NY) pointed out just a few hours ago -- no representative of a foreign country should ever be allowed to come here and run down our President or our country -- especially with lies -- as Chavez did just yesterday.<br><br>I understand CITGO is lowing their gas prices to soften the blow of any boycott.<br><br>Let's all take the kind of action Chavez will understand -- and hit him right in his wallet.<br><br>Boycott CITGO -- I don't care how low their prices go. For the good of our country -- suck it in and pay more at a station that does not support anti-USA causes. Gas prices are falling anyway.<br><br>Pass this on, so that others get the message and join the boycott. Together, we can make a difference.<br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Olberman?

Postby chiggerbit » Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:15 pm

Anybody got any links handy that does a good job explaining the two day coup that ousted him a couple of years ago? I'm going to give the friend a history lesson about our involvements in South and Central America. Also ,anybody got any pieces on events that "shock the conscience" down there from the last forty or fifty years? <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Olberman?

Postby Rigorous Intuition » Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:22 pm

<!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>Anybody got any links handy that does a good job explaining the two day coup</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--><br><br>Here's a start:<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Venezuela coup linked to Bush team</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em><br>Specialists in the 'dirty wars' of the Eighties encouraged the plotters who tried to topple President Chavez</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--><br><br>Ed Vulliamy in New York<br>Sunday April 21, 2002<br>The Observer<br><br>The failed coup in Venezuela was closely tied to senior officials in the US government, The Observer has established. They have long histories in the 'dirty wars' of the 1980s, and links to death squads working in Central America at that time.<br><br>Washington's involvement in the turbulent events that briefly removed left-wing leader Hugo Chavez from power last weekend resurrects fears about US ambitions in the hemisphere.<br><br>It also also deepens doubts about policy in the region being made by appointees to the Bush administration, all of whom owe their careers to serving in the dirty wars under President Reagan.<br><br>One of them, Elliot Abrams, who gave a nod to the attempted Venezuelan coup, has a conviction for misleading Congress over the infamous Iran-Contra affair.<br><br>The Bush administration has tried to distance itself from the coup. It immediately endorsed the new government under businessman Pedro Carmona. But the coup was sent dramatically into reverse after 48 hours.<br><br>Now officials at the Organisation of American States and other diplomatic sources, talking to The Observer, assert that the US administration was not only aware the coup was about to take place, but had sanctioned it, presuming it to be destined for success.<br><br>The visits by Venezuelans plotting a coup, including Carmona himself, began, say sources, 'several months ago', and continued until weeks before the putsch last weekend. The visitors were received at the White House by the man President George Bush tasked to be his key policy-maker for Latin America, Otto Reich.<br><br>Reich is a right-wing Cuban-American who, under Reagan, ran the Office for Public Diplomacy. It reported in theory to the State Department, but Reich was shown by congressional investigations to report directly to Reagan's National Security Aide, Colonel Oliver North, in the White House.<br><br>North was convicted and shamed for his role in Iran-Contra, whereby arms bought by busting US sanctions on Iran were sold to the Contra guerrillas and death squads, in revolt against the Marxist government in Nicaragua.<br><br>Reich also has close ties to Venezuela, having been made ambassador to Caracas in 1986. His appointment was contested both by Democrats in Washington and political leaders in the Latin American country. The objections were overridden as Venezuela sought access to the US oil market.<br><br>Reich is said by OAS sources to have had 'a number of meetings with Carmona and other leaders of the coup' over several months. The coup was discussed in some detail, right down to its timing and chances of success, which were deemed to be excellent.<br><br>On the day Carmona claimed power, Reich summoned ambassadors from Latin America and the Caribbean to his office. He said the removal of Chavez was not a rupture of democra tic rule, as he had resigned and was 'responsible for his fate'. He said the US would support the Carmona government.<br><br>But the crucial figure around the coup was Abrams, who operates in the White House as senior director of the National Security Council for 'democracy, human rights and international opera tions'. He was a leading theoretician of the school known as 'Hemispherism', which put a priority on combating Marxism in the Americas.<br><br>It led to the coup in Chile in 1973, and the sponsorship of regimes and death squads that followed it in Argentina, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala and elsewhere. During the Contras' rampage in Nicaragua, he worked directly to North.<br><br>Congressional investigations found Abrams had harvested illegal funding for the rebellion. Convicted for withholding information from the inquiry, he was pardoned by George Bush senior.<br><br>A third member of the Latin American triangle in US policy-making is John Negroponte, now ambassador to the United Nations. He was Reagan's ambassador to Honduras from 1981 to 1985 when a US-trained death squad, Battalion 3-16, tortured and murdered scores of activists. A diplomatic source said Negroponte had been 'informed that there might be some movement in Venezuela on Chavez' at the beginning of the year.<br><br>More than 100 people died in events before and after the coup. In Caracas on Friday a military judge confined five high-ranking officers to indefinite house arrest pending formal charges of rebellion.<br><br>Chavez's chief ideologue - Guillermo Garcia Ponce, director of the Revolutionary Political Command - said dissident generals, local media and anti-Chavez groups in the US had plotted the president's removal.<br><br>'The most reactionary sectors in the United States were also implicated in the conspiracy,' he said. <br><br><!--EZCODE LINK START--><a href="http://observer.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0,6903,688071,00.html">Guardian</a><!--EZCODE LINK END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Olberman?

Postby chiggerbit » Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:47 pm

Thanks, RI, copied and sent. More, please. <p></p><i></i>
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Opposition View

Postby Sweejak » Sun Sep 24, 2006 1:21 pm

<!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3378761249364089950">video.google.com/videopla...9364089950</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>This film is about the Irish Documentary. <br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Chavez the menace?

Postby yathrib » Mon Sep 25, 2006 12:13 pm

I don't get it. Even if you don't happen to care for Chavez, even if you hate his guts, what has he done that makes him a "menace," as a couple of talking heads on the Sunday morning gabfests called him? I can see how he might be annoying if--unlike me--you don't happen to think he's the third world messiah. But what has he done that's menacing? This, more than anything, shows just how irrational the "thought leaders" of U.S. politics have become, maybe always were. Or maybe not so irrational. Referring to someone as a menace tends to shut down unwanted debate... After all, who wants to be seen as insufficiently rabid about a "menace?" <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Chavez the menace?

Postby chiggerbit » Mon Sep 25, 2006 12:38 pm

Bush note to self: Add Venezuela to AXIS OF EVIL.<br><br>The man is dangerous because he has control of all that oil. If he didn't, he would just be some third-world windbag. But the Bush family seems to think that all oil is theirs. Hey, maybe it isn't Iran the military is gearing up to invade, it might be Venezuela. The military is probably sitting on pins and needles waiting to hear which leader Bush hates most at this moment. "Eenie, meanie, minie, moe, catch an oilman by the toe...." <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=chiggerbit@rigorousintuition>chiggerbit</A> at: 9/25/06 10:42 am<br></i>
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Invasion

Postby km artlu » Mon Sep 25, 2006 3:34 pm

I have a vague recollection, about which I'm curious if anyone has solid info. Something about Chavez having bought from Putin's Russia a number of missiles sometime in recent years.<br><br>This ordnance was described as conveying overwhelming superiority in defending against a naval assault. As I dimly recall, this is due to the speed and very low altitude once deployed. <br><br>Meaning that any naval assault flotilla positioned off the Venezuelan coastline would, soon after commencement of hostilities, be toast.<br><br>This is of interest to me because, if true, it would dictate strategy available to an invader. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: TURN ON THE TEEVEE! CHAVEZ IS HILARIOUS!!

Postby shalwechat » Mon Jan 22, 2007 11:55 am

sunny wrote:Mockingbird vulture: "The majority of the people of Latin America do not take Chavez seriously, but they do enjoy his rhetoric."<br><br><!--EZCODE IMAGE START--><img src="http://www.websmileys.com/sm/mad/076.gif"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END--> <p></p><i></i>



Most Latin americans do take Hugo C. sersiously. Myself I visited Venezuela about 2 years ago and other Latin American countries previous. All I can say is he is well loved by the the people and well hated by the establishment. RCTV has nothing good to say, nor does the radio. The have gone as far is threating his life. Similar to the Randi Rhodes incident of associateing Gunshot sounds with our current president as a part of a commentary. Those who lives in the slums have seen the most benefit and his biggest base. They call the hugo Chaves fever "chavismo". Building small clinicks, making micro business loans etc. His brand of populism is well recieved. Ecudor, Nicraguia, Bolivia, and to a smaller extent Chile have simmilar heads of state.
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