WTF is up with Mark Twain?

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WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby FourthBase » Thu Feb 09, 2006 11:37 am

- Bohemian Grove member<br>- Close friend of Tesla<br>- Close friend of Henry Huttleston Rogers<br>- Born and died with Haley's Comet<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://home.planet.nl/~reijd050/organisations/Bohemian_Grove.htm">home.planet.nl/~reijd050/..._Grove.htm</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The Club has 561 members, which are a combination of literary figures and San Francisco businessmen. Among them are 4 members of the Crocker banking family, 3 Spreckles, William Randolph Hearst, Bay Area shipbuilder Arthur W. Moore, columnist and writer Ambrose Bierce, writer Henry George, and 14 officers from the Army and Navy. Other Bohemian Club writers are Charles K. Field, Ina Coolbrith, Bret Harte, Daniel O'Connell, and <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Mark Twain</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain">en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Twain had a fascination with science and scientific inquiry. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Twain developed a close and lasting friendship with Nikola Tesla. They spent quite a bit of time together from time to time (in Tesla's laboratory, among other places). A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court featured a time traveller from the America of Twain's day who used his knowledge of science to introduce modern technology to Arthurian England.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> Twain also patented an improvement in adjustable and detachable straps for garments.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9e/Twain_in_Tesla%27s_Lab.jpg">upload.wikimedia.org/wiki...7s_Lab.jpg</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>In 1893, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Twain was introduced to industrialist and financier Henry Huttleston Rogers, one of the principals of Standard Oil. Rogers reorganized Twain's tangled finances, and the two became close friends for the rest of their lives. Rogers' family became Twain's surrogate family and Twain was a frequent guest at the Rogers townhouse in New York City and summer home in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. The two were drinking and poker buddies. In 1907, they traveled together in Rogers' yacht Kanawha to the Jamestown Exposition held at Sewell's Point near Norfolk, Virginia in celebration of the 300th anniversary of the founding of the Jamestown Colony</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->.<br><br>While Twain openly credited Rogers with saving him from financial ruin, there is also substantial evidence in their published correspondence that the close friendship in their later years was mutually beneficial, apparently softening at least somewhat the hard-driving industrialist Rogers, who had apparently earned the nickname "Hell Hound Rogers" when helping build Standard Oil earlier in his career. In one of history's ironies, Rogers was introduced by Twain to investigative journalist Ida Tarbell, who is widely credited with exposing the dark side of Standard Oil, and did so largely through information she obtained through meetings with Rogers. During the years of their friendship, influenced by Twain, Rogers helped finance the education of Helen Keller and made substantial contributions to Dr. Booker T. Washington. After Rogers' death, Dr. Washington revealed that Rogers (with a much-hated public persona) had been generously funding many small country schools and institutions of higher education in the South for the betterment and education of African Americans for over 15 years.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/de/Twain_and_rogers_1908.jpg">upload.wikimedia.org/wiki...s_1908.jpg</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Twain himself died less than one year later. He wrote in 1909, "I came in with Halley's Comet in 1835. It is coming again next year, and I expect to go out with it." And so he did. Halley's comet can be seen in the Earth's skies once every 75-76 years. It was visible on November 30, 1835, when Mark Twain was born and was also visible on April 21, 1910, when he died (although the exact dates of Halley's highpoint were November 16th and April 10th, respectively).<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby professorpan » Thu Feb 09, 2006 12:36 pm

WTF? Well, he's one of my personal heroes -- a brilliant, socially conscious writer.<br><br>He was a celebrity in his day, so it's no surprise that he knew some of the more interesting people in business and science. <br><br>I also am not convinced that Bohemian Grove was always as power-corrupted as it is today, nor that Twain's involvement implies anything sinister.<br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby Gouda » Thu Feb 09, 2006 3:09 pm

"The altar cloth of one aeon is the doormat of the next."<br> <br>-Mark Twain<br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Thu Feb 09, 2006 5:56 pm

Samuel Clemens aka global superstar Twain was a staunch anti-war anti-imperialist revered around the world who wrote controversial pieces like 'The War Prayer.'<br><br>Rogers was probably attempting to influence and co-opt Twain but similiar subversive' and powerful work was already out of the barn.<br><br>I found a 1973 book about the end of Twain's life called 'God's Fool' which suggests he was merely a bitter cranky old nut when he wrote his passionately anti-war pieces. <br>Note the title's neuro-linguistic programming or 'framing.'<br><br>This dates from the uptick in militarist propaganda cranked out by CIA-influenced publishers and new think-tanks for mindwar in desperate panic over anti-Vietnam War sentiments taking hold in a whole generation.<br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby marykmusic » Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:52 am

Clemons was a terrible businessman. His family faced destitution many times.<br><br>It's amazing that he was able to write the things he did, considering he had to suck up to keep getting published. It's possible that his association with the rich and famous of his era is what enabled him to write what he really wanted to, but not until the last couple decades of his life.<br><br>His essays against the Congo genocide of King Leopold (of Belgium) were probably the only truth out on that subject during the late 1800's, when it was happening. <br><br>The only voice against the American imperialism that created and followed the Spanish-American war, was also his.<br><br>And one of his last, a letter-to-the-editor purportedly written by Satan himself... brilliant! --MaryK <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby sunny » Fri Feb 10, 2006 1:04 am

I think it appropriate to post <!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>The War Prayer</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--> and ponder the wonderful mind of the one who wrote it<br><br>The War Prayer<br>by Mark Twain<br>It was a time of great and exalting excitement. The country was up in arms, the war was on, in every breast burned the holy fire of patriotism; the drums were beating, the bands playing, the toy pistols popping, the bunched firecrackers hissing and spluttering; on every hand and far down the receding and fading spread of roofs and balconies a fluttering wilderness of flags flashed in the sun; daily the young volunteers marched down the wide avenue gay and fine in their new uniforms, the proud fathers and mothers and sisters and sweethearts cheering them with voices choked with happy emotion as they swung by; nightly the packed mass meetings listened, panting, to patriot oratory which stirred the deepest deeps of their hearts, and which they interrupted at briefest intervals with cyclones of applause, the tears running down their cheeks the while; in the churches the pastors preached devotion to flag and country, and invoked the God of Battles beseeching His aid in our good cause in outpourings of fervid eloquence which moved every listener. It was indeed a glad and gracious time, and the half dozen rash spirits that ventured to disapprove of the war and cast a doubt upon its righteousness straightway got such a stern and angry warning that for their personal safety's sake they quickly shrank out of sight and offended no more in that way. <br><br>Sunday morning came -- next day the battalions would leave for the front; the church was filled; the volunteers were there, their young faces alight with martial dreams -- visions of the stern advance, the gathering momentum, the rushing charge, the flashing sabers, the flight of the foe, the tumult, the enveloping smoke, the fierce pursuit, the surrender! Then home from the war, bronzed heroes, welcomed, adored, submerged in golden seas of glory! With the volunteers sat their dear ones, proud, happy, and envied by the neighbors and friends who had no sons and brothers to send forth to the field of honor, there to win for the flag, or, failing, die the noblest of noble deaths. The service proceeded; a war chapter from the Old Testament was read; the first prayer was said; it was followed by an organ burst that shook the building, and with one impulse the house rose, with glowing eyes and beating hearts, and poured out that tremendous invocation <br><br><br>*God the all-terrible! Thou who ordainest! Thunder thy clarion and lightning thy sword!* <br>Then came the "long" prayer. None could remember the like of it for passionate pleading and moving and beautiful language. The burden of its supplication was, that an ever-merciful and benignant Father of us all would watch over our noble young soldiers, and aid, comfort, and encourage them in their patriotic work; bless them, shield them in the day of battle and the hour of peril, bear them in His mighty hand, make them strong and confident, invincible in the bloody onset; help them to crush the foe, grant to them and to their flag and country imperishable honor and glory -- <br><br>An aged stranger entered and moved with slow and noiseless step up the main aisle, his eyes fixed upon the minister, his long body clothed in a robe that reached to his feet, his head bare, his white hair descending in a frothy cataract to his shoulders, his seamy face unnaturally pale, pale even to ghastliness. With all eyes following him and wondering, he made his silent way; without pausing, he ascended to the preacher's side and stood there waiting. With shut lids the preacher, unconscious of his presence, continued with his moving prayer, and at last finished it with the words, uttered in fervent appeal, "Bless our arms, grant us the victory, O Lord our God, Father and Protector of our land and flag!" <br><br>The stranger touched his arm, motioned him to step aside -- which the startled minister did -- and took his place. During some moments he surveyed the spellbound audience with solemn eyes, in which burned an uncanny light; then in a deep voice he said: <br><br>"I come from the Throne -- bearing a message from Almighty God!" The words smote the house with a shock; if the stranger perceived it he gave no attention. "He has heard the prayer of His servant your shepherd, and will grant it if such shall be your desire after I, His messenger, shall have explained to you its import -- that is to say, its full import. For it is like unto many of the prayers of men, in that it asks for more than he who utters it is aware of -- except he pause and think. <br><br>"God's servant and yours has prayed his prayer. Has he paused and taken thought? Is it one prayer? No, it is two -- one uttered, the other not. Both have reached the ear of Him Who heareth all supplications, the spoken and the unspoken. Ponder this -- keep it in mind. If you would beseech a blessing upon yourself, beware! lest without intent you invoke a curse upon a neighbor at the same time. If you pray for the blessing of rain upon your crop which needs it, by that act you are possibly praying for a curse upon some neighbor's crop which may not need rain and can be injured by it. <br><br>"You have heard your servant's prayer -- the uttered part of it. I am commissioned of God to put into words the other part of it -- that part which the pastor -- and also you in your hearts -- fervently prayed silently. And ignorantly and unthinkingly? God grant that it was so! You heard these words: 'Grant us the victory, O Lord our God!' That is sufficient. the *whole* of the uttered prayer is compact into those pregnant words. Elaborations were not necessary. When you have prayed for victory you have prayed for many unmentioned results which follow victory--*must* follow it, cannot help but follow it. Upon the listening spirit of God fell also the unspoken part of the prayer. He commandeth me to put it into words. Listen! <br><br>"O Lord our Father, our young patriots, idols of our hearts, go forth to battle -- be Thou near them! With them -- in spirit -- we also go forth from the sweet peace of our beloved firesides to smite the foe. O Lord our God, help us to tear their soldiers to bloody shreds with our shells; help us to cover their smiling fields with the pale forms of their patriot dead; help us to drown the thunder of the guns with the shrieks of their wounded, writhing in pain; help us to lay waste their humble homes with a hurricane of fire; help us to wring the hearts of their unoffending widows with unavailing grief; help us to turn them out roofless with little children to wander unfriended the wastes of their desolated land in rags and hunger and thirst, sports of the sun flames of summer and the icy winds of winter, broken in spirit, worn with travail, imploring Thee for the refuge of the grave and denied it -- for our sakes who adore Thee, Lord, blast their hopes, blight their lives, protract their bitter pilgrimage, make heavy their steps, water their way with their tears, stain the white snow with the blood of their wounded feet! We ask it, in the spirit of love, of Him Who is the Source of Love, and Who is the ever-faithful refuge and friend of all that are sore beset and seek His aid with humble and contrite hearts. Amen. <br><br>(*After a pause.*) "Ye have prayed it; if ye still desire it, speak! The messenger of the Most High waits!" <br><br>It was believed afterward that the man was a lunatic, because there was no sense in what he said. <br><br><br><br>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br>Twain apparently dictated it around 1904-05; it was rejected by his publisher, and was found after his death among his unpublished manuscripts. It was first published in 1923 in Albert Bigelow Paine's anthology, Europe and Elsewhere. <br>The story is in response to a particular war, namely the Philippine-American War of 1899-1902, which Twain opposed.<br>. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby marykmusic » Fri Feb 10, 2006 1:14 am

[The following letter, signed by Satan and purporting to come from him, <br>we have reason to believe was not written by him, but by Mark Twain.-- <br>Editor.] <br><br>TO THE EDITOR OF HARPER'S WEEKLY: <br><br><br>Dear Sir and Kinsman,--Let us have done with this frivolous talk. <br>The American Board accepts contributions from me every year: <br>then why shouldn't it from Mr. Rockefeller? In all the ages, <br>three-fourths of the support of the great charities has been <br>conscience-money, as my books will show: then what becomes of <br>the sting when that term is applied to Mr. Rockefeller's gift? <br>The American Board's trade is financed mainly from the graveyards. <br>Bequests, you understand. Conscience-money. Confession of an old <br>crime and deliberate perpetration of a new one; for deceased's <br>contribution is a robbery of his heirs. Shall the Board decline <br>bequests because they stand for one of these offenses every time and <br>generally for both? <br><br>Allow me to continue. The charge must persistently and resentfully <br>and remorselessly dwelt upon is that Mr. Rockefeller's contribution is <br>incurably tainted by perjury--perjury proved against him in the courts. <br>IT MAKES US SMILE--down in my place! Because there isn't a rich <br>man in your vast city who doesn't perjure himself every year before <br>the tax board. They are all caked with perjury, many layers thick. <br>Iron-clad, so to speak. If there is one that isn't, I desire <br>to acquire him for my museum, and will pay Dinosaur rates. <br>Will you say it isn't infraction of the law, but only annual evasion <br>of it? Comfort yourselves with that nice distinction if you like-- <br>FOR THE PRESENT. But by and by, when you arrive, I will show you <br>something interesting: a whole hell-full of evaders! Sometimes a <br>frank law-breaker turns up elsewhere, but I get those others every time. <br><br>To return to my muttons. I wish you to remember that my rich <br>perjurers are contributing to the American Board with frequency: <br>it is money filched from the sworn-off personal tax; therefore it <br>is the wages of sin; therefore it is my money; therefore it is _I_ <br>that contribute it; and, finally, it is therefore as I have said: <br>since the Board daily accepts contributions from me, why should it <br>decline them from Mr. Rockefeller, who is as good as I am, let the <br>courts say what they may? <br><br><br>Satan.<br><br><br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby sceneshifter » Sat Feb 11, 2006 4:10 am

<!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong><br><!--EZCODE FONT START--><span style="color:blue;font-family:comic sans ms;font-size:medium;"><br><br>'I bring you the stately matron named Christendom, returning...from pirate-raids in Kiao-Chow, Manchuria, South Africa and the Philippines, with her soul full of meanness, her pocket full of boodle and her mouth full of pious hypocrises. Give her soap and a towel but hide the lookingglass' Mark Twain, A salutation-speech from the 19thC to the 20thC - <br><br>James Joyce seems to allude to this in a line in Finnegans Wake: Now if soomone felched [fetched] a twoel [towel] and soomonelses warmet watter [war-met matter, warm water] we could, while you was saying Morkret Miry [Margaret Mary, Dark and mire-y] or Smud, Brunt and Rubbinsen [Smith, Brown and Robinson, Mud, Burnt and Rub-in-son] [Before you could say Jack Robinson], make sunlike sylp [sunlight soap] om [on] this warful [war-full, awful] dune's battam [bottom] [clean up the baby's dirty bottom], FW594<br><br>And Joyce seems to borrow the overtones and connotations of 'stately', as used here by Twain, for the first word of Ulysses [regarded as the greatest novel of the 20thC by literary people]. 'Stately' is used of the character who, in the last word of this first chapter, is called 'Usurper' by the character based on the character of James Joyce himself, ie, the defender of justice and truth - James Joyce sublimated his anger and passion and hatred of the 'usurpers' of human society, because he believed that for a poet to be angry imposed a 'far worse tyranny' on humanity than that the tyranny of the evil ones imposed - because it discouraged the savers of truth and justice from exercising dispassion and cool intelligence in their pursuit of truth and justice<br><br>First words of anything Joyce wrote were always loaded with maximum poetry and concentration and aptness of meaning - Stately here meaning 'pompous and ceremonial', but also 'of the state', with implication that all state ceremonial is hypocritical - <br><br>Buck Mulligan, the 'Usurper', here in the beginning of Ulysses, is performing a jocular, mocking Black Mass - So, is it coincidence that Stately contains the last word of Ulysses, the yes of profound and heartfelt and liberating affirmation of love and life, backwards?<br><br>But back to Mark Twain, Joyce's soulbrother in greathearted sorrow at the historical nightmare:<br><br>'The methods of the priest and parson have been very curious; their history is very entertaining. In all the ages, the Roman Church has owned slaves, bought and sold slaves, authorised and encouraged her children to trade in them. Long after some Christian peoples had freed their slaves, the Church still held on to hers. If any could know, to absolute certainty, that all this was right, and according to God's will and desire, surely it was she. Since she was God's specially appointed representative in the earth and sole authorised and infallible expounder of his bible. There were the texts; there was no mistaking their meaning; she was right, she was doing all this thing that the bible had mapped out for her to do. So unassailable was her position, that in all the centuries she had no word to say against human slavery.....Yet now, at last, in our immediate day, we hear a Pope saying slave trading is wrong, and see him sending an expedition to Africa to stop it. The texts remain; it is the practice that has changed. Why? Because the world has corrected the bible. The Church never corrects it; and also never fails to drop in at the tail of the procession - and take the credit for the correction......During many ages there were witches. The bible said so. The bible commanded that they should not be allowed to live. Therefore the Church, after doing its duty in but a lazy and indolent way for 800 years, gathered up its halters, thumbscrews and firebrands, and set about its holy work in earnest. She worked hard at it night and day during nine centuries, and imprisoned, tortured, hanged and burned whole hordes and armies of witches, and washed the Christian world clean with their foul blood. Then it was discovered that there was no such thing as witches, and never had been. One does not know whether to laugh or cry. Who discovered that there was no such thing as a witch - the priest, the parson? No, these never discover anything. At Salem, the parson clung pathetically to his witch text after the laity had abandoned it in remorse and tears for the cruelties it had persuaded them to do. The parson wanted more blood, more shame, more brutalities; it was the unconsecrated laity that stayed his hand ... There are no witches. The witch text remains; only the practice has changed. Hell fire has gone, but the text remains. Infant damnation is gone, but the text remains. More than 200 death penalties are gone from the law books, but the texts that authorised them remain!'<br><br>This is such a valuable, rare [?unique] quote: Useful to encourage the people as pioneers in ethics, to help free the people from deference and submission to the churches and other insane authorities. James Joyce talked of 'flying by the nets' laid to ensnare him by church and state. He wrote a comic song of 'paddling your own canoe' and not defering and submitting to authorities. He talked of 'flinging the keys of hell and of death far into the abyss'. In 'Portrait of the artist as a young man', [regarded as the third greatest 20thC novel, [after The great Gatsby] ] he portrays a sensitive young man liberating himself from fear of hell, and he talks of creating [more of] the conscience [ie, the good sense and goodwill] that enabled the 'unconsecrated laity' to decide issues like witches and slavery, and lead church and state out of its sadisms. He said: All governments are the same: pirates. Which, again, may owe something to Mark Twain's excoriation of 'Christendom' ['returning from pirate-raids in Kiao-Chow...'] In his youth, Joyce tries to commit the unforgivable sin in order to 'get outside the outermost rim of Catholicism'. An interesting point when you read the works of Avro Manhattan warning of the Catholic take-over of America ['The Catholic Church against the 20thC' and 'The dollar and the Vatican']. It is suggested there that the Catholic Church has constructed a 'soft' version of Catholicism for easier digestion by Americans. As you will learn from George Seldes's great collection 'The great quotations' [Not his 'The great thoughts', which is relatively boring], the Catholic Church regards freedom of thought as merely the freedom to be wrong, since the Church is right. <br><br>If teachers were not subtley chosen and pressured to be pro-establishment, or to be entirely uncritical of the establishment, quotes such as these of Twain would appear in every classroom. <br><br>In another quote, which I do not have to hand, Mark Twain makes the very sensible and rarely made point, that [supposedly] 'God' creates us, and then has the 'cheek' to try to put on us the responsibility for our natures.</span><!--EZCODE FONT END--><br></strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby FourthBase » Sat Feb 11, 2006 5:45 am

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>'The methods of the priest and parson have been very curious; their history is very entertaining. In all the ages, the Roman Church has owned slaves, bought and sold slaves, authorised and encouraged her children to trade in them. Long after some Christian peoples had freed their slaves, the Church still held on to hers. If any could know, to absolute certainty, that all this was right, and according to God's will and desire, surely it was she. Since she was God's specially appointed representative in the earth and sole authorised and infallible expounder of his bible. There were the texts; there was no mistaking their meaning; she was right, she was doing all this thing that the bible had mapped out for her to do. So unassailable was her position, that in all the centuries she had no word to say against human slavery.....Yet now, at last, in our immediate day, we hear a Pope saying slave trading is wrong, and see him sending an expedition to Africa to stop it. The texts remain; it is the practice that has changed. Why? Because the world has corrected the bible. The Church never corrects it; and also never fails to drop in at the tail of the procession - and take the credit for the correction......During many ages there were witches. The bible said so. The bible commanded that they should not be allowed to live. Therefore the Church, after doing its duty in but a lazy and indolent way for 800 years, gathered up its halters, thumbscrews and firebrands, and set about its holy work in earnest. She worked hard at it night and day during nine centuries, and imprisoned, tortured, hanged and burned whole hordes and armies of witches, and washed the Christian world clean with their foul blood. Then it was discovered that there was no such thing as witches, and never had been. One does not know whether to laugh or cry. Who discovered that there was no such thing as a witch - the priest, the parson? No, these never discover anything. At Salem, the parson clung pathetically to his witch text after the laity had abandoned it in remorse and tears for the cruelties it had persuaded them to do. The parson wanted more blood, more shame, more brutalities; it was the unconsecrated laity that stayed his hand ... <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>There are no witches.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> The witch text remains; only the practice has changed. Hell fire has gone, but the text remains. Infant damnation is gone, but the text remains. More than 200 death penalties are gone from the law books, but the texts that authorised them remain!'<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>That's interesting.<br><br>Look everyone, I'm not accusing him of anything. He's a hero to all rational people and he fought injustice. But I'm dumbstruck by his relationship with the Grove, Tesla, and the robber baron Rogers. If Twain didn't have such a sparkling record of fighting injustice, his assocation with those three would be scrutinized, I'm guessing. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby marykmusic » Sat Feb 11, 2006 12:44 pm

Why the problem with Tesla? He was a genius long before his time; was ripped off by Edison; and possibly killed before he could finish his free-energy work. --MaryK <p></p><i></i>
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Re: WTF is up with Mark Twain?

Postby FourthBase » Sat Feb 11, 2006 6:25 pm

No problem with him, Tesla is awesome.<br>But he's certainly a focus of much paranormal speculation.<br><br>Like I said, I just thought Twain would get more scrutiny. <p></p><i></i>
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