Katrina

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Katrina

Postby Dreams End » Sun Aug 28, 2005 9:58 pm

I've noticed a little pattern to the last several hurricanes, and I hope it holds. They are MONSTROUS up until just before they hit land, then they get downgraded a step or two. don't know if it means anything, but right now, I'm just hoping the pattern holds.<br><br>By the way, lots of oil refineries in LA. More gas price hikes...no doubt higher than they need to be. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Katrina

Postby GDN01 » Sun Aug 28, 2005 11:37 pm

Gas prices already climbing on the market.<br><br>But the storm is not weakening. I'm watching this unfold and can't believe what is being predicted.<br><br>They've got over 12,000 people in the Superdome. They are predicting the dome will flood - how deep no one knows. The reporter on CNN just said they have told the people they could be trapped in the dome for two days - with no electricity or air conditioning. And only the food they brought in with them. <br><br>Does this sound like a place you would want to be?<br><br>The city could be uninhabitable for weeks. I hope it won't be as bad as the predictions. But my god - this storm is huge. <br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Katrina

Postby dbeach » Sun Aug 28, 2005 11:41 pm

forced evac of N.O. maybe bush can get the governor to do a martial law kinda like a trial run for more martial laws..<br><br>ever hear of HAARP or controlled wheather by the russians? <p></p><i></i>
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katrina

Postby mother » Sun Aug 28, 2005 11:56 pm

Who can sleep? No TV, so it leaves me guessing and letting the old scalar and HAARP technology paranoia affect my better judgement. And why are all those people going to stay at the Superdome? Why did the evacuation order come so late? Hurricane City said bush made a TV statement earlier today, so that only increases my suspicion, the old guns of August rumor. And forbidding alcohol at a time like this is just plain cruel. So I'll pray for a miraculous happy turn of events. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: katrina

Postby heyjt » Mon Aug 29, 2005 12:09 am

Forbidding alcohol? Oh my! I'd probably tie myself to a tree with a bottle of vodka.<br> This may truely be a historic event.<br> I heard that the water temperature in the gulf is as high as 90 degrees, and that is the heat engine that is fueling the storm. <br> Global warming? What's that? <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Katrina

Postby Dreams End » Mon Aug 29, 2005 1:28 am

I'm not saying that this is somehow deliberate...but if this thing hits New Orleans....well, we in the south will get the first real taste of martial law. It looks nasty...and I REALLY hope they have a plan to get those people out of that stadium.<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.easttennessean.com/media/paper203/news/2004/10/11/News/Direct.Hurricane.Hit.Could.Drown.City.Of.New.Orleans.Experts.Say-749652.shtml">www.easttennessean.com/me...9652.shtml</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br>Direct hurricane hit could drown city of New Orleans, experts say<br>By Paul Nussbaum, KRT Campus<br>Published: Monday, October 11, 2004<br><br><br>Residents sift through the wreckage of their homes after one of this year´s many damaging hurricanes and tropical storms.<br>Media Credit: KRT Campus<br>Residents sift through the wreckage of their homes after one of this year´s many damaging hurricanes and tropical storms.<br><br>NEW ORLEANS - From a helicopter above the Gulf of Mexico, Col. Peter Rowan could see that his first line of defense had been breached.<br>Where Breton and the Chandeleur Islands had been, only pale green water now sparkled in the sun. Hurricane Ivan had pummeled the sand and grass barriers two weeks earlier, washing away much of them - and the hurricane protection they provide for New Orleans.<br>"It looks like it's pretty much all gone," said Rowan, commander of the New Orleans district of the Army Corps of Engineers.<br>The second line of defense is vanishing, too. Wetlands, which absorb much of the storm surge of approaching hurricanes, are disappearing at the rate of 28,000 acres a year, bringing the sea that much closer to the city.<br>So New Orleans, tucked below sea level between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain, is in growing danger of drowning. A direct hit by a very powerful hurricane could swamp its levees and leave as much as 20 feet of chemical-laden, snake-infested water trapped in the man-made bowl.<br>More than 25,000 people could die, emergency officials predict. That would make it the deadliest disaster in U.S. history, with many more fatalities than the San Francisco earthquake, the great Chicago fire, and the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks combined.<br>"It's only a matter of time," said Terry C. Tullier, city director of emergency preparedness.<br>"Ivan just missed us by a hairsbreadth," he said. "The thing that keeps me awake at night is the 100,000 people who couldn't leave."<br>After Ivan slipped past 175 miles to the east, the 600,000 residents who evacuated last month returned, knowing they might need to flee again: The hurricane season lasts through November, and forecasters believe the Atlantic region has entered an active cycle that could last 15 to 30 years.<br>The root of the problem is location. New Orleans is hemmed in by 300-square-mile Lake Pontchartrain to the north and the Mississippi to the south and west.<br>Built on newly deposited alluvial soil, the city has been sinking ever since its founding in 1718. Draining land for development has made it sink even faster. And sea levels are rising.<br>To protect the city from floods, the river and lake have been lined with levees, grass-covered walls as high as 18 feet. The levees keep the Mississippi in its channel, but they have exacerbated the loss of wetlands by cutting off the periodic flood of freshwater and sediment necessary for the wetlands' survival. And the levees would trap water in the city if they are overtopped in a big hurricane.<br>Hurricanes are part of life here, as much as beignets and beads, but most recent storms have spared New Orleans. Betsy (Category 3) hit in 1965, leaving eight feet of water in some places. Camille (Category 5) in 1969 swept by 60 miles to the east. Andrew (also Category 5) in 1992 came within 100 miles. This year, it was Ivan.<br>The levees are designed to protect the city from a fast-moving Category 3 hurricane. A more powerful one, such as this year's Charley or Ivan (Category 4), or a slow Category 3 could send lake water surging over the levees.<br>The worst scenario would be a big hurricane arriving from the east, pushing a wall of water from the gulf into Lake Pontchartrain, then over the levees into the city.<br>There it would remain, submerging single-story houses and lapping at the eaves of two-story buildings.<br>"The Red Cross has estimated 25,000 to 100,000 would drown, and I don't think that is unrealistic," said Ivor van Heerden, director of Louisiana State University's Center for the Study of Public Health Impacts of Hurricanes. About 300,000 of the area's 1.2 million people would not evacuate, he predicted, and many of those would be the most vulnerable - elderly, disabled, homeless, carless.<br>Rescuing 300,000 people trapped inside the flooded bowl would be a logistical nightmare, and officials have started enlisting private boat owners who could help a Dunkirk-style operation to ferry people out.<br>There are national implications, too, if New Orleans is hammered. About one-fourth of the nation's oil and natural-gas production is here, as is one-third of its seafood catch. Thousands of miles of oil and gas pipelines snake through the bayous and marshes. The region is home to the nation's largest port complex, moving 16 percent of its cargo.<br>Experts say it will take a combination of higher levees, new floodgates and restored wetlands to save New Orleans. And time is not an ally; hurricane-protection projects are moving slowly, even as the threat seems to grow each year.<br>"It's possible to protect New Orleans from a Category 5 hurricane," said Al Naomi, senior project manager for the Corps of Engineers. "But we've got to start."<br>___<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Katrina

Postby Dreams End » Mon Aug 29, 2005 1:53 am

Going to bed now. As of 11:52 CST US Katrina's eye looks as if it is being "steered" for a direct hit on New orleans. Storm hasn't weakened...one prediction of mine I wish WOULD come true. For anyone in the area:<br><br>Our thoughts are with you. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Katrina

Postby ZeroHaven » Mon Aug 29, 2005 7:57 am

<!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>dbeach - ever hear of HAARP or controlled wheather by the russians?</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--><br><br>I can totally verify the weather control, because it's part of the local news in my part of the world. They literally don't let it rain on their parades! <p><!--EZCODE IMAGE START--><img src="http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a239/ZeroHaven/tinhat.gif"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END--></p><i></i>
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Re: Katrina

Postby Dreams End » Mon Aug 29, 2005 11:40 am

The eye moved east just enough to keep the levees in NO from failing. The damage is extensive, but the feared citywide flooding probably won't happen. Still, many people will be without homes for quite some time. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Katrina

Postby dbeach » Mon Aug 29, 2005 11:48 am

ZERO<br>U is a riot but don't let georgie declare marital law on ya..<br>oops martial law . jr won't know which to declare. maybe that will save us all?<br><br>CS says he will write no more?<br><br>like to know where he is a going cuz georgie is not gonna leave any safe havens or zero havens or dbeaches and there is 2 dbeaches <p></p><i></i>
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