Mexico is haven for U.S. pedophile priests

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Where they're sent

Postby Fat Lady Singing » Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:32 pm

Hi all--Chiggerbit asked where paedophile priests are sent. One answer is: New Mexico. From Catholic World News:<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Priest Murdered At New Mexico Monastery<br><br>Dec. 10, 2001<br><br>JEMEZ SPRINGS, New Mexico, Dec 10, 01 (CWNews.com) - A Catholic priest was found on Saturday murdered in a monastery that is home to a treatment center for priests and brothers with personal difficulties.<br><br>Father Michael Mac, 60, from Winslow, Arizona, was found Saturday morning in his residence at the Via Coeli Monastery. He was still wearing his night clothes and had head injuries consistent with a bludgeoning, Sandoval County Sheriff Ray Rivera said. "It looks like the victim had gone to bed," Rivera said. "He awakened and probably surprised the intruders."<br><br>Investigators said they may have identified at least one assailant, but have not released a name. They did release a description of Father Mac's 1993 Subaru hatchback which they believe the killer may have taken. Police said the killer or killers may be headed east.<br><br>The treatment center is run by the Servants of the Paraclete religious order and serves priests suffering from a variety of problems and disorders. Rivera said he did not know why Father Mac had come to the monastery a week ago, but said he had received treatment there about six years ago. He had then returned to the Diocese of Gallup, New Mexico, which includes parts of Arizona.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Here's the Servants of the Paraclete official website:<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.theservants.org/frame.htm">www.theservants.org/frame.htm</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>Here's from their particularly softly worded mission:<br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr><br>The ministry of the Servants of the Paraclete helps priests and Brothers who are experiencing difficulties and working through the specific developmental phases of life. <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>There's a lot more, which I'll post in a moment.<br><br>edited to add link to Catholic World News story:<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=17006">www.cwnews.com/news/views...cnum=17006</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=fatladysinging@rigorousintuition>Fat Lady Singing</A> at: 9/27/06 6:12 pm<br></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby chiggerbit » Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:27 pm

<!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>and I was later lied to outright by Fr. Liam Hoare, the head of the Servants of the Paraclete, one of the major players in the cover-up. One weird weekend...</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--><br><br>Sarabit, is that the same Servants of the Paraclete that FLS just mentioned above, the "therapeutic" center? Attending the convention at St. John's, all the way from New Mexico? <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby Fat Lady Singing » Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:32 pm

OK, here's more about the murder, again from Catholic World News:<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=17150">www.cwnews.com/news/views...cnum=17150</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Suspect Arrested In Murder Of Priest In New Mexico<br><br>Jan. 04, 2002<br><br>BERNALILLO, New Mexico, Jan 4, 03 (CWNews.com) - New Mexico police have charged a man with the murder of a priest at a clergy treatment center after the man confessed to the crime.<br><br>Steven Degraff, 33, was already in jail for an unrelated crime when he confessed to the murder of Father Michael Mack at the Servants of the Paraclete Monastery, a treatment center for troubled priests near Jemez Springs where he had begun working last year. Police said the men did not know one another and that the death was part of a bungled break-in.<br><br>Father Mack's body was found on December 8. Degraff worked at a restaurant several miles north of Jemez Springs, authorities said. Days before the murder, deputies say they saw him sitting on a highway guardrail near the priest's cottage. After questioning, he led deputies to Father Mack's car, which was found in Sandoval County, according to court records.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Check out this LA Times story, on bishopaccountability.org:<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://tinyurl.com/p93rf">tinyurl.com/p93rf</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>Seems several notorious paedophile priests were sent to New Mexico (and Mexico):<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Reports Show Failure of Therapy for Priests</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br>Pedophile Clerics Often Continued to Abuse Children during and after Treatment, and Were Allowed to Continue in Ministry<br><br>By Jean Guccione and William Lobdell<br>Los Angeles Times [California]<br>May 25, 2005<br><br>Documents released Tuesday reveal the failure of the Diocese of Orange's decades-old strategy of trying to cure pedophile priests with therapy, detailing how the clerics continued to abuse young boys while in treatment but were cleared by psychologists to return to the ministry.<br><br>The files also show that Roman Catholic officials ignored a recommendation to limit one cleric to an adults-only ministry and allowed him to set and enforce his own rules against being alone with children.<br><br>The hundreds of pages of psychotherapist reports, billings and other internal memos were the latest documents released as part of a court-approved $100-million settlement reached in December between the Orange diocese and <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>90 alleged victims</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->.<br><br>Last week, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Peter D. Lichtman ordered the production of more than 10,000 pages from the confidential personnel files of <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>15 accused priests and teachers.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>Those papers document the transfer of predator priests from parish to parish and diocese to diocese, as well as efforts to protect them from prosecution while failing to warn parishioners of the danger.<br><br>The newly released reports detail the psychological evaluation and treatment of nine priests ordered into counseling after allegations of sexual abuse surfaced — a typical church response until a "zero tolerance" policy was adopted by U.S. bishops in 2002, requiring removal of abusive priests.<br><br>Several priests underwent failed attempts at therapy — some costing the Orange diocese more than $3,000 a month, the papers show.<br><br>The reports reveal failed efforts to rehabilitate three of Orange County's most notorious predator priests, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Siegfried Widera, Andrew Christian Andersen and Eleuterio "Al" Ramos.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>In the case of a fourth priest, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Michael Pecharich,</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> a psychologist recommended to Orange Bishop Norman F. McFarland in 1996 that the cleric — who admitted to repeatedly molesting a boy — be restricted to an adults-only ministry, a therapist report shows.<br><br>The psychologist urged McFarland to keep Pecharich away from altar boys, catechism classes and other church activities involving unsupervised contact with children, according to a 1996 psychological assessment and report.<br><br>Instead, church officials allowed Pecharich to remain for six more years as pastor of south Orange County's San Francisco Solano Church, across the street from Santa Margarita High School and affiliated with a nearby Catholic elementary school.<br><br>According to notes from a 1997 meeting, McFarland and Msgr. John Urell, who investigated sex abuse allegations at the time, ordered Pecharich to abide by his own self-imposed restrictions, which included never being alone with a minor.<br><br>Pecharich asked his supervisors if he should tell a parish staff member about his new rules, according to the notes signed and dated by Urell. "It was decided there was no reason to do so," the note said.<br><br>After he admitted kissing and inappropriately touching a boy four times a decade earlier, the priest was praised for his honesty by both his therapists and church officials, the reports say. Six more abuse allegations were later made against Pecharich.<br><br>In 2002, Pecharich was removed from ministry by Bishop Tod D. Brown under a court-approved "one strike" policy to get rid of molesting priests.<br><br>Pecharich, 59, of Long Beach, remains a priest but is barred from ministry. He has declined to comment about the allegations against him.<br><br>Church officials also let another priest, Widera, decide his own fate, the documents show.<br><br>Before Widera joined the Orange diocese in 1977, he had been convicted of molesting a boy in Milwaukee and had another allegation pending. Orange church officials took him anyway.<br><br>But when Widera was accused of molesting three boys in Orange County in 1985, Bishop William R. Johnson gave him three options: get treatment, go to a monastery or leave the priesthood, according to new documents.<br><br>A note in his file at that time stated "No one else will take you."<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>The priest opted for therapy at a residential treatment center run by the Servants of the Paraclete religious order in Jemez Springs, N.M., </strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->where he was diagnosed with pedophilia, a report says.<br><br>At the center, Widera admitted he molested at least 10 boys in Orange County, according to a psychological evaluation.<br><br>Despite his earlier conviction, diagnosis of deviancy and confession, the director of the treatment facility worked to find Widera a post in another diocese after Orange refused to take him back.<br><br>"I believe that Siegfried is truly a good minister and will continue to be a good minister within the church. It would be a shame for him not to be able to find a bishop who would accept him," stated a 1986 progress report to Johnson. Widera dropped out of the treatment program and became a businessman.<br><br>Widera was charged with 42 counts of molestation in Orange County and Milwaukee in 2002. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>He was on the run for a year, mostly in Mexico, and in 2003 leaped to his death from a hotel window in Mazatlan when cornered by authorities. He was 62.<br></strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br>In 1986, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Andersen, another diagnosed pedophile, </strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->was convicted in Orange County on 26 counts of felony molestation and faced 56 years in prison. As an alternative to prison, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>a judge ordered him to the same New Mexico facility that had treated Widera.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>During a counseling session that same year, Andersen was asked whether psychoanalysis had helped him curb his sexual appetite for children, the psychiatric reports show.<br><br>"In the beginning of therapy, I was still acting out with the kids but after 22 months of therapy, I stopped!!!" Andersen told his psychiatrist, according to a 1986 report to then-Orange Auxiliary Bishop John T. Steinbock, now bishop of Fresno.<br><br>"To me, this is an absolute travesty," his psychiatrist wrote in Andersen's monthly progress report to the diocese. "His therapy cost the diocese over $10,000 and while he was undergoing it, he was continuing to act out sexually with kids."<br><br>At first Andersen was described in reports as "a very troubled man" unable to reform himself after years of therapy.<br><br>By 1988, as he progressed in counseling, a therapist recommended that Andersen celebrate a public Mass at a senior citizens home.<br><br>"He has every intention of remaining in the priesthood and we fully agree that he work to do so," wrote Father Theodore Isaias, a director of the Servants of the Paraclete facility.<br><br>A year later, in 1989, Andersen was regularly saying Mass at a local hospital and for a male religious order, over the objections of Bishop McFarland of Orange, the reports show.<br><br>Andersen was arrested in Albuquerque in 1990 on suspicion of trying to sodomize a 14-year-old boy, and was ordered to serve six years in prison for violating his probation in the California case.<br><br>He was defrocked in the mid-1990s, and his whereabouts are unknown.<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>The Servants of the Paraclete has closed its treatment program in Jemez Springs, admitting that "mistakes were made," </strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->according to a congregation history on the order's website. The congregation blamed negative media reports and "a prevailing litigious spirit" for the closure.<br><br>Another admitted pedophile, Ramos was treated for alcoholism at a different Catholic-run residential treatment center in 1979 and 1980, even though Orange church officials knew at the time of at least one complaint that he had given boys alcohol and showed them adult movies in the rectory, the reports state.<br><br>When Ramos returned to Orange County, he spent a year in therapy "to work through his emotional difficulties of a sexual nature," according to the therapist's report.<br><br>His therapy terminated in May 1982, and he won praise for his work.<br><br>"We are very happy for Father Ramos whom we have always considered a wonderful priest and we know that he is now even more capable of exercising his ministry within the Diocese of Orange," wrote then-Chancellor Michael P. Driscoll, who now serves as bishop of Boise.<br><br>Ramos told police in 2003 that he had had sex with or fondled at least 25 boys. One accuser said in court papers that Ramos and three other men gang-raped him as an boy in a San Diego hotel room in 1984.<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>The priest was transferred to Tijuana a year later, and died last year at age 64.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby Fat Lady Singing » Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:52 pm

Here's an interesting, if inflammatory, article:<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.theharrowing.com/nmmystery.html">www.theharrowing.com/nmmystery.html</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Mysteries Remain in New Mexico<br>A Decade After the Clergy Abuse Scandals<br><br>"The sexual affairs of priests in the U.S. are more closely guarded secrets than the classified details of our national defense."<br> — Emmett McGloughlin, Crime and Immorality in the Catholic Church, 1962<br><br> Forty years have passed since McGloughlin, a former Phoenix Franciscan, wrote those disturbing words. But only now is their truth becoming apparent, especially here, in the Land of Enchantment — and Secrets.<br><br> New Mexico has been as deeply enmeshed in concealing the secrets of the church as it has been in protecting those of the federal government.<br><br> At the start of 1947, the year of Roswell's flying saucers, the CIA and the Cold War, and just across the mountains from the secret atomic city of Los Alamos, a new religious order was born in an old inn. It was situated in the beautiful Jemez Canyon.<br><br>Priests serving priests<br><br> Founded by Fr. Gerald Fitzgerald, a former military chaplain, the Servants of the Paraclete have played a significant role in what is now a global crisis.<br><br> His noble idea was to help priests having difficulties with their vocation, mainly alcoholics, and to provide a refuge for those who couldn't cope and had nowhere else to go.<br><br> However, he came to New Mexico not just for the natural beauty, but for the same reason the military and its bomb designers did: isolation.<br><br> New Mexico has always been in the outlands, where powerful government institutions could build their projects largely out of public view. For the church, there were added advantages in a large sympathetic Catholic population crying out for more priests.<br><br> New Mexico's faithful would eagerly accept whatever clergy they could get, with few questions asked.<br><br> So Archbishop Edwin V. Byrne of Santa Fe was the only person who responded when Fitzgerald put out a request for a place to situate his monastery.<br><br> Fitzgerald moved quickly, buying 2,000 acres in the Jemez. Ultimately, a halfway house (now sold) was set up in Albuquerque's South Valley, and other centers were established in St. Louis and even in England.<br><br> Fr. Liam Hoare, third head of the order, boasted that by the time Fitzgerald died in 1969, "in the Catholic Church, Jemez Springs had become a byword for `healing.'"<br><br> To some, perhaps. However, according to McGloughlin, among the clergy it had been known as "ecclesiastical 'jail'" for at least 15 years.<br><br> McGloughlin was a forerunner of all those priests who would quit and get married after Vatican II, the Second Ecumenical Council to modernize the church during which some did not realize their hope to modify clerical celibacy but provisions were adopted for leaving the priesthood. He wrote controversial books with a rare alternative glimpse inside the pre-Vatican II Church.<br><br> "It will come as a surprise to most Americans," he wrote in 1954, "to know that there are institutions in the United States to which priests are sent without any trial. . . . One (such), supported by the hierarchy, is in Jémez (sic) Springs, New Mexico, near Albuquerque."<br><br> "The `crimes' for which priests are sent . . . are generally alcoholism, insubordination, or lapses in the realm of celibacy," he wrote.<br><br> Then he recounted case after case of fallen priests, such as Fr. Dukind, caught by the FBI in 1960 living in Phoenix with a 17-year-old girl he had abducted from Wisconsin. Dukind fully expected to be sent to Jemez Springs instead of jail.<br><br> But Fitzgerald wanted nothing to do with child abusers, it was revealed during the lawsuits. Calling them "devils," he said "the wrath of God" was on them, and they should be forcibly ousted from the priesthood.<br><br> Thinking child abusers were incurable, in 1963 the Servants of the Paraclete might have bought a Caribbean island to isolate them for life. But for reasons still not clear, a deal was worked out instead with the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and others to quietly reintroduce some sex offenders to parish ministry. The tragic results of that decision are well known.<br><br> Meanwhile, not all was happy in Jemez Springs. Fr. John Murphy, pastor of the local parish, complained in the mid-1960s that the monastery's "guests" were making homosexual passes at local residents, and that some members of the order themselves had their own serious, untreated problems with alcohol, drugs and sexual issues.<br><br> According to the Paracletes, they began a residential program in 1977 (perhaps a reference to the half-way house in Albuquerque). But that decade, they also destroyed most of their old files - supposedly to save space - and advised the Archdiocese to do the same.<br><br> Since their programs are confidential, there is only their word that residential treatment actually has ended in Jemez Springs. Hopefully, it is more trustworthy than those assurances they gave that Fathers James Porter, David Holley and Jason Sigler - among others whom they let loose - were cured and safe.<br><br> They have admitted, however, that an unidentified number of dropouts from their program might still be living in the state.<br><br> Also, several strange deaths of priests have been associated with them in recent years, including two murders. The most recent victim, Fr. Mike Mack, a Paraclete, was killed in one of their own houses. When arrested, the suspect claimed he acted in self-defense.<br><br>Scandal out of Santa Fe<br><br> The Archdiocese of Santa Fe (“the city of Holy Faith”) was an early epicenter of the crisis. Archbishop Robert Sanchez became the first high prelate in the nation to be disgraced by the scandal when CBS’ newsmagazine 60 Minutes revealed his affairs with several women. Whether he was being blackmailed, his inability to cope with the situation was a factor along with the state being used as a dumping ground.<br><br> The current Archbishop, Michael J. Sheehan, has done much to settle claims and calm the flock. He, however, has his own baggage too — he was the rector of the seminary who admitted former-priest Rudy Kos, whose abuse in Dallas (including phoning boys while he was still in treatment at Jemez Springs) led to the biggest settlement against the Church to that time.<br><br> Puzzling questions linger around clergy of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, too. For example, there is the recent convoluted Albuquerque case of Fr. Robert Malloy, a former police chaplain and pastor of Queen of Heaven Church.<br><br> He was accused in 1998 of 42 charges, including sexual offenses against boys, evidence tampering and hiring or offering for hire some boys to perform sexual acts. After a long, strange investigation in which even his own attorney was briefly forbidden to see the evidence, he was finally given nearly five years probation after pleading no contest to five counts of attempted criminal solicitation to commit tampering with evidence, suspended from working in a parish, forbidden to have unsupervised contact with minors and required to attend therapy.<br><br> What he was up to was not clear. The evidence was sealed for a long time, and when revealed, showed a bizarre and detailed scheme. He apparently sent explicitly sexual anonymous notes to somewhere between five and fourteen teenaged boys requesting semen samples to be delivered to him through dead-drops right out of a spy novel in return for cash. He asked them to destroy the notes, which led to the final charges. Some of the letters can be seen here.<br><br> Some boys complied — police even found a videotape of Malloy examining the sperm through a microscope in his kitchen, making comments like a doctor. This puzzling behavior, prosecutors thought, would undoubtedly have led to direct contact and attempted oral sex had he not been arrested.<br><br> And speaking of puzzling, where's Fr. Perrault?<br><br> Arthur J. Perrault, a very prominent pastor, former teacher at St. Pius X High School, guest of the Paracletes and abuser of both sexes, was a close friend of Archbishop Robert Sanchez. He disappeared shortly after the first rumors concerning him surfaced in 1992 and has not been seen since.<br><br> Was he tipped off or helped? Is he being protected somewhere, for some reason?<br><br> The Archdiocese fought hard and successfully to protect its secrets from The Albuquerque Tribune and other news organizations that joined to seek the release of information gathered during the lawsuits.<br><br> A panel of four judges suppressed much of it, including the names of sexually active priests that Archbishop Sanchez gave during his depositions. Why are all those records still concealed?<br><br>Silence of the Missions<br><br> Finally, what about New Mexico's original population, the Pueblo Indians? In Canada, lawsuits brought against the churches and the government over horrific abuses of native people in the residential school system have already bankrupted one Catholic order and threaten the entire Catholic and Anglican churches there.<br><br> Yet, there have been no such lawsuits here. Were Indians here, subject even longer to the missions, somehow luckier? Or are their stories yet to be heard?<br><br> The Indians endured oppression from the first European contact, not just by the conquistadores, but by the missionaries who accompanied them. The Spanish encomienda system set up missions as estates, built and maintained by the native population as payment for the “enlightenment” brought by the friars.<br><br> And the Spanish, of course, brought the Inquisition with them, headquartered at the pueblo of Quarai. The Inquisition and Spanish officials were vigilant against the Indian population “relapsing” into their former ways. In 1675, for instance, the colonial governor, had 48 religious leaders from various pueblos whipped and forced to do hard labor, and several hung. The Spanish had put down attempted rebellions at least twice before that, but this would lead to their undoing, for the survivors included Popé and a couple other leaders of the revolt that, for a dozen years, would succeed in pushing the Spanish out.<br><br> The Inquisition did pursue its other usual suspects here, including witches. According to a new book, The Witches of Abiquiu, witch trials lasting a decade were launched by a Franciscan priest, Juan Jose Toledo, who believed a group of Indians living in the area had bewitched him and made him sick.<br><br> Meanwhile, the inquisitors struggled against the colonial administration and were also on the watch for “crypto-Jews,” those Jews who escaped deportation from Spain by falsely converting to Christianity. They were forbidden to travel to the colonies lest they escape the watchful eyes of the authorities, yet many did. Several were found in New Mexico, and one even was burned with due ceremony in Mexico City. Others remain to this day in the villages of northern New Mexico, some still practicing their ancestral religion secretly, like their neighbors in the kivas.<br><br> Yowe KachinaAs for the Indians, one indication of their true feelings might be the fact that among the Hopis, the figure of Yowe, the Priest-Killing Kachina appeared as their protector. This semi-divine figure depicted with a cross (or sometimes a severed head) in one hand, and a bloody knife in the other is said to have killed the Catholic priest at Oraibi who stole his girlfriend (!).<br><br> When the Pueblo Revolt ignited in 1680, the missions were a major target of the Indians, and indeed, fortified churches such as in Santa Fe provided refuge for some beleaguered colonists. But the Indians killed what priests they could find – 21 in all – and burnt the hated missions. And even today, there are still tales of lost Franciscan treasure waiting to be found...<br><br> These days, New Mexicans might rightly feel a sense of déjà vu over current headlines.<br><br> But there is no reason to be complacent, because clearly there is much still to be revealed in this secret land where abusive priests were sent to “ecclesiastical ‘jail.’”<br><br>A version of this was originally printed in The Albuquerque Tribune, 5/7/02.<br>Last updated 4/21/06.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby chiggerbit » Wed Sep 27, 2006 9:26 pm

<!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>Fr. Liam Hoare, third head of the order, boasted that by the time Fitzgerald died in 1969, "in the Catholic Church, Jemez Springs had become a byword for `healing.'"</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby chiggerbit » Wed Sep 27, 2006 9:37 pm

James Porter, a "graduate of the Paraclete therapy center. From Wiki:<br><br>:James Porter (priest)<br>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia<br>Jump to: navigation, search<br>James Porter (January 2, 1935 - February 11, 2005) was a Roman Catholic priest who molested at least 125 children of both sexes over a period of 30 years, starting in the 1960s. His imprisonment in 1993 was a precursor to the Roman Catholic Church sex abuse scandal a decade later.<br><br>Born in Revere, Massachusetts in 1935, Porter started both training for the priesthood and molesting children at a young age; he abused his earliest known victim in 1953, the summer before he entered seminary. He was ordained in 1959.<br><br>Porter was assigned to St. Mary's parochial grammar school in North Attleboro in April 1960 and put in charge of the altar boys. Complaints of sexual abuse, ranging from fondling to rape, quickly surfaced against him, but Porter's superiors ignored them, going so far as to bully his accusers into recanting. At least one of Porter's supervisors had first-hand knowledge of the abuse.<br><br>In 1964, Porter was arrested for molesting a 13-year-old boy and sent to a mental institution for 13 months. Once released, he was quickly reassigned to another parish, the first of many such reassignments over the years. He was shuffled into two more parishes before more accusations piled up and he was hospitalized again in 1967, this time to a hospital run by fellow priests who practiced holistic psychotherapy upon its patients, many of whom were clergy members suffering from psychological problems. Porter's "problem" was not unique among the hospital's patients; two of them were later imprisoned for abusing, between them, hundreds of children.<br><br>Porter was released after a few months, once again declared cured, and given probationary assignments in parishes in Texas, New Mexico and Minnesota, all of which included access to children. Complaints surfaced by the dozen against Porter, but none of them resulted in disciplinary action beyond his being quietly moved from post to post.<br><br>Porter left the priesthood in 1974 and eventually settled in Minnesota with a wife and four children, all of whom were unaware of his past.<br><br>In 1990, a man named Frank Fitzpatrick went public with accusations that Porter had abused him as a child in the '60s. Over the next two years, Fitzpatrick contacted the state police, the FBI, and the media, resulting in over two hundred people coming forward and leveling charges of abuse against Porter. A 1992 segment on Porter's crimes on the NBC TV news magazine Primetime Live, hosted by Diane Sawyer, sparked national attention, and Porter was arrested, tried and convicted of sexually abusing his children's babysitter in 1984. He served four months of a six-month prison sentence before his conviction was overturned by the Minnesota Supreme Court.<br><br>In a foreshadowing of future disgrace, Cardinal Bernard Law of the Boston Archdiocese criticized the media attention Porter's case received, saying that the media "liked to focus on the faults of the few" in the Catholic Church. A decade later, Law resigned after widespread criticism of his handling of cases like Porter's.<br><br>By 1993, dozens of lawsuits had cropped up against Porter in Minnesota, Texas and New Mexico; in Minnesota alone, he was charged with over two hundred counts of sexual abuse. Porter's lawyer struck a plea bargain with the state, and Porter was sentenced to 18-20 years in prison, with possibility of parole, with counseling, after six years. Parole was consistently denied. Porter died of cancer in prison on February 11, 2005....<br><br> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=chiggerbit@rigorousintuition>chiggerbit</A> at: 9/27/06 7:38 pm<br></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby chiggerbit » Wed Sep 27, 2006 9:41 pm

<!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.boston.com/globe/spotlight/abuse/archives/071592_porter.htm">www.boston.com/globe/spot...porter.htm</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby Project Willow » Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:24 pm

I'm reading, just not much time to get into details right now.<br><br>Sarabit, good for you speaking out!<br><br>Has anyone contacted SNAP about this thread?<br>It looks as though priests have been relocated all over the place. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby chiggerbit » Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:26 pm

Oh, wow, Truth or Consequences:<br><br><!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>"...James Porter seemed to do well in the Paraclete program, which was long on rest and prayer but short on therapy. While the Paracletes occasionally dispensed Depo-Provera to suppress sexual appetites, most of the program involved meditation, wilderness experience, and pottery classes, while individual counseling was restricted to one hour per week. “What we do here is forgive,” one of the Paraclete directors, Father William Perri, told the Rocky Mountain News in 1987. “That means sometimes making some very hard decisions because some things are very hard to forgive.” Father William Foley, head of the Paraclete order, had a simpler prescription for judging his “guests” and their progress: “We just get an intuition that they’re going to work out.” <br><br>By July 1967 the Paraclete staff saw “real hope” for Porter’s rehabilitation, and he was recommended for a trial basis to say Mass at various churches in New Mexico. Bishop Connolly contributed a letter to the archbishop of Santa Fe, announcing, “I cheerfully endorse [Porter’s] application” there. Assigned to fill in for a vacationing priest at Truth-or-Consequences, New Mexico, Porter soon relapsed into “his old failings” (as described in Paraclete files) and molested at least six more children - including one victim confined to a full-body cast at a local hospital...."</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=chiggerbit@rigorousintuition>chiggerbit</A> at: 9/27/06 8:32 pm<br></i>
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Re: Where they're sent

Postby chiggerbit » Wed Sep 27, 2006 11:02 pm

I have to give the Abbot at St. John's credit for taking steps for doing something about sexual abuse of children. However, there is something about the Abbot's and the Church's response that is a little underwhelming, and I'm trying to put my finger on what bothers me about it. I guess it's a feeling that the Vatican has finally acknowledged the new reality, here in the states at least, and recognizes that the problem will cost it money and loss of flock. So the response has this feeling of acting "counter-intuitively". In orther words, the intuition is to protect and cover for the molestor, but the chosen action now has to be counter-intuitive, to protect the children.<br><br>As an illustration of the "intuitive" Church reaction, I have cut some pieces from the article below which is a very long read, about James Porter (who was NOT associated with St. John's, btw). The best one is the last one.<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial_killers/predators/porter/index_1.html">www.crimelibrary.com/seri...dex_1.html</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>...........On August 17, 2001, Christopher Reardon, a lay worker at St. Agnes Catholic Church in Middleton, Massachusetts, was convicted of molesting 29 boys and sentenced to a prison term of 40 to 50 years. Testimony in that case revealed that Cardinal Law’s attorneys had encouraged various parishioners to withhold information from investigators, fearing that the case would prompt new lawsuits against the archdiocese. Despite that sworn evidence, a Pilot editorial of August 24 insisted that “The accusations that the cardinal ignored, was indifferent to, or refused to address the scandalous behavior of any priest is, at best, ignorant.” The same editorial went on to claim that <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>“no one has suffered more than Cardinal Law” from priestly sexual abuse of children in the Archdiocese of Boston.....</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br><br><br>....Cheryl Porter, no relation and herself one of Father Porter’s victims, once saw the priest standing with his pants unzipped before two altar boys and ran to tell Father Armando Annunziato. Rather than going to investigate, Annunziato shouted, “Why are you stirring up trouble?” and slammed his door in her face. Speaking next to a nun at the school, Cheryl was forced to stand up in class, confess her “lie” and apologize for blackening Porter’s good name.<br><br>Father Annunziato, for his part, had personal knowledge of Porter’s crimes. He had walked in on Porter once, while Porter was sodomizing victim John Robitaille, then turned and left the room without a word, closing the door behind him. On another occasion, Annunziato knocked on Porter’s locked office door while Porter was inside, molesting victim Peter Calderone. “What’s going on in there?” Annunziato asked, when Porter refused to admit him, but his interest was limited at best. Rather than forcing entry, Annunziato simply told Porter, “It’s getting late, time for everyone to go home,” and left him to continue his assault..... <br><br><br><br>......... An angry mother confronted Father Annunziato and another priest, Father Booth, telling them, “There’s no way I’m going to take communion from that man’s dirty hands.” The two priests tried appeasement, then turned angry, Father Booth shouting, “What are you trying to do, crucify the man?......<br><br> <br><br>.......Still, no action was taken, until Porter embarrassed the church with his arrest for molesting a 13-year-old boy in New Hampshire. State police obliged the church by escorting Porter to the Massachusetts border and setting him free. Bishop Connolly, for his part, made a note in Porter’s file that the latest victim was a “non-Cath,” suggesting that church influence might be unable to bury the case......<br><br> <br>....Bishop Connolly took Porter’s “cure” at face value and forgave his prior transgressions, assigning Porter to Sacred Heart Church in New Bedford, Massachusetts - some 15 miles from the scene of his original crimes at St. Mary’s. Fathers Duffy and O’Dea, at Sacred Heart, were warned by their monsignor that Porter had “a problem with little boys,” but no special precautions were taken to isolate him from children.....<br><br> <br><br>....and again, complaints began to multiply. <br><br>Church officials did their best to ignore Porter’s crimes in New Bedford, but with 28 known victims since his arrival in town, the clamor of protest was soon inescapable. Bishop Connolly sent Porter back to his parents once more, with new orders to pray and repent, but the exile was short lived. In late 1966, a friend of Porter’s in a nearby parish invited Porter to join his church. Porter gladly agreed - and soon began molesting children there, as well.<br><br><br><br><br><br>..... While newspapers in North Attleboro and New Bedford soft-pedaled the story, refusing to print Porter’s name, the Boston Globe ran an aggressive series of articles on the expanding case. Cardinal Law responded on May 23 by raging at the press, ignoring Porter’s crimes and the officials who had covered for him. “The papers like to focus on the faults of the few,” Law declared. “We deplore that. By all means we call down God’s power on the media!” ....<br><br>...Exposure of the Porter and Geoghan cases barely exposed the tip of the iceberg where pedophile priests were concerned, and the Catholic Church has been rocked by nonstop scandals ever since. Pope John Paul declared, in January 2002, that the Vatican would hold secret tribunals in future to deal with clerical child molesters....<br><br>....In Santa Fe, Archbishop Robert Sanchez maintained the tradition of denial, blaming lawsuits filed against the church on Jewish attorneys driven by hatred of Catholics. That claim, however, failed to explain Sanchez’s own resignation in 1993, after his sexual affairs with five parish women were exposed. Phase two of the denial in New Mexico was advanced by Archbishop Michael Sheehan in September 1996, with the strange assertion that Sanchez “was not fully aware that it was a crime to sexually abuse children until 1981.” No explanation was forthcoming as to how that mental lapse accounted for Sanchez’s denials between 1981 and 1993. ...<br><br> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=chiggerbit@rigorousintuition>chiggerbit</A> at: 9/28/06 1:03 pm<br></i>
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Re: St. John's Creepy Abbey

Postby chiggerbit » Wed Sep 27, 2006 11:18 pm

<!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>As a side-issue (but connected) I am assuming you all have heard of the Kincora scandal here in UK ? A boy's home in Northern Ireland.</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--><br><br>No, Alice, don't think I remember hearing of that one. More? <p></p><i></i>
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Re: St. John's Creepy Abbey

Postby alice » Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:57 am

<!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.missingpersons-ireland.freepress-freespeech.com/archive-kincorascandal.htm">www.missingpersons-irelan...candal.htm</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>here's a starter. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: St. John's Creepy Abbey

Postby alice » Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:59 am

Monday 15 January 1982<br>James Prior, then Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, announced the setting up of a Committee of Inquiry into the sexual abuse of children who lived in the Kincora Boys Home in Belfast. [The Kincora Scandal first broke on 3 April 1980 when three staff members of the Kincora Boys Home, Belfast, were charged with acts of gross indecency. Allegations continued to be made that elements of the security service, civil servants and a number of Loyalists had been involved in the abuse of young boys at Kincora. One of those sentenced was William McGrath who was the leader of a Loyalist paramilitary group called Tara.]<br><br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: St. John's Creepy Abbey

Postby alice » Thu Sep 28, 2006 8:03 am

<br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199091/cmhansrd/1991-01-21/Writtens-3.html">www.publications.parliame...ens-3.html</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>Ken Livingstone asked questions again in 1991 in House of Commons ..scroll down and see under Kincora and also Collin Wallace.<br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: St. John's Creepy Abbey

Postby chiggerbit » Thu Sep 28, 2006 12:33 pm

<!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>It should be noted , Birr Castle is the home of the 7th Earl of Rosse, who is Lord Snowden's stepbrother.(Lord Snowden is Princess Margaret's estranged husband) The castle was built in the 1600's and the 1st Earl of Rosse, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Richard Parsons was one of the founder members of Irelands aristocratic Satanic cult , The Hellfire Club.Many of my cult sources inform me that Devilworship is hereditary ; handed down through the generati</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--></em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END-->[/b]<br><br><br>OMG, trying to remember the name of the Parsons, I think was associated with Crowley(?). Wonder what his family tree looks like. <p></p><i></i>
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