My grandfather's first saucer model from family's sighting

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Re: My grandfather's first saucer model from family's sighti

Postby Luther Blissett » Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:19 am

Another, somewhat unrelated factor: he always said that stories of "foo fighters" or "gremlins" were common within the aviation community doing Alaskan runs in the early-to-mid 40's, and said these were credible pilot accounts. He never saw or heard of them before, after, or outside of the Pacific Rim.
The Rich and the Corporate remain in their hundred-year fever visions of Bolsheviks taking their stuff - JackRiddler
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Re: My grandfather's first saucer model from family's sighti

Postby Hammer of Los » Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:47 am

...

Perhaps the War on Earth caught the attention of the Foo Fighters.

Ball Lightning?

Plasma?

...
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Re: My grandfather's first saucer model from family's sighti

Postby semper occultus » Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:52 am

Luther Blissett wrote:
barracuda wrote:Luther, you've called this your grandfather's first saucer model... were there more?


I totally forgot to explain that. He built a second (which I think he may have intended to experiment with Tesla-like effects on an actual gyroscope - much different than this first model) which was also subsequently lost. We didn't suspect malice on the misplacement of that one, and I can remember seeing it back in the very early 80's. It was white.


....the scientist Eric Laithwaite was on a similar track....

In 1974, Laithwaite was invited by the Royal Institution to give a talk on a subject of his own choosing. He decided to lecture about gyroscopes, a subject in which he had only recently become interested. His interest had been aroused by an amateur inventor named Alex Jones, who contacted Laithwaite about a reactionless propulsion drive he (Jones) had invented. After seeing a demonstration of Jones's small prototype (a small wagon with a swinging pendulum which advanced intermittently along a table top), Laithwaite became convinced that "he had seen something impossible". In his lecture before the Royal Institution he claimed that gyroscopes weigh less when spinning and, to demonstrate this, he showed that he could lift a spinning gyroscope mounted on the end of a rod easily with one hand but could not do so when the gyroscope was not spinning. At this time, Laithwaite suggested that Newton's laws of motion could not account for the behaviour of gyroscopes and that they could be used as a means of reactionless propulsion. The members of the Royal Institution rejected his ideas and his lecture was not published. (This was the first and only time an invited lecture to the Royal Institution has not been published.) They were subsequently published independently as 'Engineer Through The Looking-Glass'

en.wikipedia.org


..he actually came to my school once to do the prize-giving & I seem to recall him saying ( I may have read it later ) that his interest started during WWII - he was involved in the RAF & saw one of the bomber crew returning from a mission carrying a gyroscope & that somehow it suddenly lifted & threw him bodily off his feet...
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Re: My grandfather's first saucer model from family's sighti

Postby Hammer of Los » Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:03 am

...

I remember reading all about that. Yes, it made quite an impression on me at the time.

But lookee here.

KWH?

His interest had been aroused by an amateur inventor named Alex Jones.


...
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