Masculinities of the far right

Moderators: DrVolin, 82_28, Elvis, Jeff

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:55 am

Don’t vote for our racist, homophobic, anti-Semitic dad, son and daughter of GOP candidate warn

By Rex Santus Nov 1, 2018

Image

A Republican Missouri House candidate is racist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic, according to the man’s own son and daughter.

Steve West’s children, Emily and Andy West, have begun speaking to media publications to warn voters that their father, a 64-year-old Christian radio host, should not be elected to the state’s House.

“I can’t imagine him being in any level of government,” Emily told The Kansas City Star on Monday.

The Wests recently decided to speak out after they drove through the district where their father is running and saw yard signs in support of him. The 15th district is currently represented by a Democrat, Jon Carpenter, who won by double digits in 2012.

“If he gets elected, it would legitimize him,” Andy said to AP. “Then he would become a state official, and he’s saying that Jews shouldn’t even have civil rights.”

Andy West has also said that his father supports the removals of Jews from the United States.

On Oct. 15, days before the shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue where 11 worshippers were murdered, Steve West, 64, spoke about Israel on his show, "The Hard Truth with Jack Justice," saying the country gave the U.S. gay marriage and was “anti-Christian.”

“They have been running this assault on America,” he said to AP. “They have been giving us gay marriage, pornography, abortion, everything that’s anti-Christian. This is what they do. This is how they corrupt a Christian nation, because they are an anti-Christ people.”

Back in 2017, West said that Hitler “was right.”

“Looking back in history, unfortunately, Hitler was right about what was taking place in Germany,” West said on his radio show. “And who was behind it.”

West said that his children are speaking out because his ex-wife, their mother, has “poisoned them” against him.

“I had a toxic divorce from my ex-wife and she’s poisoned my kids, and I have to live with that,” West told AP.
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Sat Nov 03, 2018 8:10 pm

Florida yoga shooter was a misogynist who wanted ‘crucifixion’ for ‘American whores’

BY MARTIN VASSOLO November 03, 2018 06:11 PM


In a series of videos posted to his YouTube channel four years ago, the man police say killed two women at a Tallahassee yoga studio before turning the gun on himself expressed deep-seated misogyny that he said was caused by repeated rejections from women he tried to engage with romantically.

Scott Beierle, 40, shot six people and pistol-whipped another after walking into the yoga studio on the second floor of a shopping plaza. He killed a Florida State University student and a faculty member before shooting himself, police said.

Police told reporters Saturday that they were investigating what prompted the shooting, but the videos he posted to the internet in 2014 paint the picture of an apparent “incel,” or someone who had been involuntarily celibate, with a seething rage against women.

Beierle posted 15 videos in a span of three days in August 2014. Some have since been deleted.

In one video, “The American Whore Pt. 2,” he discusses potential forms of “appropriate” punishment for promiscuous women.

“I would vote for crucifixion myself,” he said. “The most heinous crime warrants the most heinous punishment.”

In another video, titled “The Rebirth of my Misogynism,” Beierle says that his hatred for women started in eighth grade, when he discovered the “collective treachery” of girls his age. He lists the names of several girls who he said sparked his misogyny. He said his feelings toward woman went dormant until he went off to college at FSU, when women already in relationships gave him their phone numbers and one woman called the police on him for visiting her at work.

“Again, this mentality [of] ‘let’s just run to the authorities when our feelings are hurt,’” he said. “I had committed no wrong. I was just trying to court this particular female.”

He also mentions one romantic interest from his college years who he said would repeatedly cancel planned dates.

“I could’ve ripped her head off,” he said. “The treachery that a female is capable of when her sensibilities are offended to me is astonishing. The lengths that they will go to — lying, exaggerating, outright lying.”


https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/ ... 86465.html
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:15 am

How mass shooters practice their hate online

Shooters like Scott Beierle often leave behind a trail of hate. And some are part of online communities that encourage and celebrate violence.

By Anna North Updated Nov 3, 2018, 9:19pm EDT

Image
Emergency personnel stationed outside a yoga studio after a gunman killed two women inside on November 2, 2018 in Tallahassee, Florida.


Years before he killed two women at a yoga studio in Tallahassee, Florida, Scott Beierle was posting YouTube videos in which he called women “sluts” and “whores” and talked about ripping their heads off.

Beierle, who killed himself on Friday after killing Nancy Van Vessem and Maura Binkley and wounding five others at Hot Yoga Tallahassee, had filmed several virulently misogynist videos in 2014, according to David Mack, Amber Jamieson, and Julia Reinstein of BuzzFeed News. He had also uploaded sexist and violent songs to Soundcloud in the last few months.

In the videos, Beierle rants about women who canceled dates or gave him their phone numbers even though they had boyfriends. He also mentions Elliot Rodger, the gunman who killed six people and wounded 13 in Isla Vista, California in 2014 — and who has become a hero to men who identify as “incels” (short for “involuntary celibate”).

The Tallahassee shooting was the third crime in a single week that was apparently preceded by a trail of online hate. Robert Bowers, the man suspected of killing 11 people and wounding six others in a shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue last Saturday, appears to have posted threatening language about Jewish people and HIAS National Refugee Shabbat, a refugee aid group formerly known as the Hebrew Immigration Aid Society, on Gab, a social network that has become a home for anti-Semitism and racism.

Cesar Sayoc, the man arrested last Friday in connection with bombs mailed to CNN and several critics of President Donald Trump, appears to have threatened Democrats on Twitter and Facebook. “Hug your loved son,Niece,wife family real close everytime U walk out your home,” said one tweet sent to former Vice President Joe Biden, apparently by Sayoc. It included an image of Biden’s home with a target superimposed on it.

The postings apparently made by Beierle, Bowers, and Sayoc were part of a pattern going back years. Elliot Rodger left behind a YouTube video in which he said women would be punished for not being attracted to him. And George Sodini, a gunman whose murder of three women at a gym outside Pittsburgh in 2009 appears to share similarities with the Tallahassee shooting, maintained a blog detailing his anger toward women for months before committing the crime.

These men share more than their apparent online histories of bigotry. All were part of communities, online or off, that seemed to reinforce their views. That’s why online hatred and harassment is so serious. It’s not just that an individual person’s online posts can be warning signs of future violence. It’s also that hateful posts, even by those who never commit crimes, create an environment where those crimes are encouraged, accepted, and even celebrated.

Many mass murderers and other criminals have left behind an online trail

Beierle’s YouTube and SoundCloud history is rife with violent sexism. In one video, he says of a woman who canceled dates with him, “I could have ripped her head off,” according to BuzzFeed. In a song called “Locked in My Basement,” he describes holding a woman prisoner and raping her.

He mentions Rodger in a video called “Plight of the Adolescent Male,” saying, “I’d like to send a message now to the adolescent males ... that are in the position, the situation, the disposition of Elliot Rodger, of not getting any, no love, no nothing. This endless wasteland that breeds this longing and this frustration. That was me, certainly, as an adolescent.”

Beierle had also been arrested in 2012 and 2016 for grabbing women’s buttocks without their consent, according to the Tallahassee Democrat.

Meanwhile, posts apparently by Robert Bowers, the alleged Pittsburgh assailant, reveal a history of anti-Semitism, and a web of influences. On Gab, someone by the name of Robert Bowers posted a variety of anti-Semitic slurs and statements, including “jews are the children of satan,” according to the Associated Press. The same user criticized President Trump for being insufficiently anti-Jewish, and bragged about his gun collection, calling it his “glock family” and saying one gun in particular had an “amazing trigger.”

As Vox’s Jane Coaston notes, Gab was started as a “free speech” alternative to Twitter, and allows forms of hate speech that are banned on more mainstream social networks. Because of this, it’s become a gathering place — and recruitment forum — for neo-Nazi groups. One post from a group called Atomwaffen Division features swastikas, racial slurs, and the invitation, “Join your local Nazis.”

The synagogue shooting suspect also acted out of a specific kind of anti-Semitism, as Vox’s Dara Lind points out: “blaming Jews in America for bringing in an invasion of nonwhite immigrants who would slaughter the white race.” This particular kind of bigotry has been fueled by Trump’s claims that his political opponents are at fault for the caravan of migrants approaching the US, and by anti-Semitic conspiracy theorists on Gab and other social networks, who have cast the caravan as a Jewish “invasion.”

Most of the people posting this theory online have never committed anti-Semitic violence, but they helped create the conditions under which something like the Pittsburgh shooting could occur.

Twitter and Facebook accounts connected to Sayoc contain threats against Biden and former Attorney General Eric Holder, both of whom received pipe bombs. CNN analyst Phil Mudd also received a Twitter threat apparently from Sayoc. Political analyst Rochelle Ritchie reported a threat apparently from Sayoc to Twitter in the days before the shooting, but Twitter did not take action.

Sayoc was apparently a devotee of a variety of conspiracy theories, many of which have spread on Twitter. As Vox’s German Lopez points out, he often posted criticisms of liberal billionaire George Soros, a common target of anti-Semitic fear-mongering on Twitter and elsewhere. Trump has fanned the flames of this fear-mongering, retweeting a claim earlier this year that Soros was a “nazi who turned in his fellow Jews.”

Beierle, Bowers, and Sayoc were far from alone in leaving what appear to be online trails pointing to future violent behavior.

“Tomorrow is the day of retribution,” Rodger said in his last YouTube video, according to the New York Times. “For the last eight years of my life, ever since I hit puberty, I’ve been forced to endure an existence of loneliness, rejection and unfulfilled desires. Girls gave their affection and sex and love to other men but never to me.”

“I do not know why you girls aren’t attracted to me,” he added. “But I will punish you all for it.”

Rodger also identified as an “incel” and posted on forums populated by men with similar frustrations. The 22-year-old, who took his own life after killing others, became something of a hero to other “incels,” as Vox’s Zack Beauchamp has noted. A man who killed 10 people by driving a van down a Toronto street in April identified himself on Facebook as part of the “Incel Rebellion.” Also on Facebook, he praised the Rodger, calling him the “Supreme Gentleman,” a nickname Rodger had chosen for himself.

The man who shot and killed three women at a Pittsburgh gym, meanwhile, wrote on his personal website in 2008, “I dress good, am clean-shaven, bathe, touch of cologne – yet 30 million women rejected me – over an 18 or 25-year period.”

“A man needs a woman for confidence,” he added. “He gets a boost on the job, career, with other men, and everywhere else when he knows inside he has someone to spend the night with and who is also a friend. This type of life I see is a closed world with me specifically and totally excluded.”

He also had ties to the pickup artist community, having purchased the book How to Date Young Women: For Men Over 35, and appearing in a video of one of author R. Don Steele’s lectures. Pickup artistry, more in vogue in the early 2000s than it is now, sometimes treated women as less human than men, as “targets” to be coerced or fooled into sex. It’s not murder, of course, but this was the climate of misogyny in which he planned his crime.


https://www.vox.com/identities/2018/10/ ... sburgh-gab
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)


Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Mon Nov 05, 2018 7:34 am

LAURIE STONE

Body Language

I don’t look up in case you are at the window or someone else drifts by with a scarf at her neck

Image

November 1, 2018


LAST NIGHT I WATCHED My Dinner with Hervé, an HBO movie about the French actor Hervé Villechaize, who played Tattoo on Fantasy Island and gained fame and wealth in the 1970s and ’80s. He was a dwarf, and in the film is portrayed by Peter Dinklage, wearing black wigs and speaking in a high-pitched French accent so full of grief and mischief he conjures the sadness of everyone ensnared by biology and politics. Those half-lowered eyes. That smile of pain and knowledge. The movie is a bit corny. Jamie Dornan, who plays a journalist sent by a UK newspaper to write a lampoon of Villechaize, is outplayed in scenes by Dinklage because Dornan’s role is to be guided and to discover a sense of identification.

Today I flew over mountains that were right there, dark shadows rippling over bright brown rock. The lift-off felt like the breath-catch of sex, and I wondered if I could fall in love with the body of a stranger. I was thinking about the threat made last week to trans people and how it is also a threat to female humans, whether or not they acknowledge it. Females, homosexuals, trans people, gender fluid people, people who defy gendered dress codes and body norms all undermine the notion of maleness as a one-stop, biologically determined thing owed supremacy. If maleness were an essential thing, nothing could weaken its dominance. It would exist inviolate, like an atom of oxygen in a molecule of water. Everyone on the planet knows you have to protect maleness all the time or the truth of people’s hybrid nature will force a redistribution of power between the sexes. That would cost a lot of money.


https://nplusonemag.com/online-only/onl ... -language/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:27 pm

“He Set Out to Kill Women”: Self-Proclaimed Misogynist Murders 2 Women at Florida Yoga Studio

BuzzFeed has reported Beierle posted racist and misogynistic video screeds on a YouTube channel in 2014, where he called women “sluts” and “whores.” He also bemoaned, quote, “the collective treachery” of girls who had attended high school with him. Another of his 2014 videos was titled “The Rebirth of My Misogynism.” Beierle had also expressed sympathy for Elliot Rodger, who killed six people in Isla Vista, California, in 2014, after posting a misogynistic video online vowing to take his revenge on women for sexually rejecting him. Rodger had urged other “incels,” or involuntary celibates, to fight back. Beierle reportedly served two years in the military, from 2008 to 2010.

Friday’s attack comes in the wake of a spate of lethal gun attacks in recent weeks. Last month, a gunman entered Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue Saturday, shooting and killing 11 Jewish worshipers in what has been described as the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in American history. Just days before that, a white gunman fatally shot two African Americans at a Kentucky grocery store, shortly after trying and failing to enter a black church.

To talk more about the implications of Friday’s attack and the murder of two women, we go to Washington, D.C., where we’re joined by Soraya Chemaly, longtime writer, feminist activist, author of the new book Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger. She’s also director of the Women’s Media Center Speech Project.

Soraya, welcome back to Democracy Now!

SORAYA CHEMALY: Thank you, Amy.

AMY GOODMAN: Talk about what you understood happened on Friday afternoon. It was about 5:30, apparently, when this man walked into this yoga studio in Tallahassee, Florida.

SORAYA CHEMALY: I think it’s very clear that it was a premeditated act of violence. And he walked into a yoga studio, which is a target of opportunity, like a school, for example, or a shopping mall, where there are certainly, predictably, more women. He set out, I think, to kill women. And that’s what he did. In many of these cases, men are also hurt and killed, as in the case with Elliot Rodger. But, you know, I think he’s been very clear. He documented his intent. He documented his feelings. And there is this direct connection between these communities of misogynistic and racist hate and the violence that we are seeing.

AMY GOODMAN: Explain the male supremacy movement.

SORAYA CHEMALY: The male supremacy movement is sort of sprawling, networked communities that believe that men are being wronged, first of all, and that they’re being oppressed. And they’re extremely authoritarian at their core, because they’re based on ideas and rules and hierarchies in which men dominate. And when men’s domination is challenged, either through women achieving political power or withholding sex, in the case of incels, that men feel they’re owed, those are challenges. And the way it becomes tessellated in the brain of some of these men is that they’re actually defending themselves. I think George Lakoff, years ago, wrote an excellent piece about the metaphorical language of rape and showed the way men who assault women and rape and then eventually kill women see this as a way of self-defense, which we saw in Elliot Rodger’s manifestos and in videos such as the one that this perpetrator had made.

AMY GOODMAN: And explain who incels are and what 4chan is and where you can find these kind of channels, for example, that he kept on YouTube.

SORAYA CHEMALY: So, actually, they’re openly available on any of these platforms. Reddit is a thriving ground. Reddit, I think, has tried on various occasions to shut down some incel groups, but they regenerate in other forums as subreddits—4chan, 8chan, YouTube. These are openly available expressions of misogynistic—usually misogynistic hatred, that’s married with racism and xenophobia. And people are free to say what they want to say, and they do. And so, it’s not very difficult to find this.

I mean, for those of us who have been writing about it or very aware for years, this is sort of unsurprising. I think that the levels of vitriol and hatred and grossly misogynistic language and imagery that we see in these places shocks people, but I’m not sure why. I mean, this is not new. And in fact, it’s sort of an extreme efflorescence of what we see in the popular culture. But we shouldn’t be surprised by it anymore.

AMY GOODMAN: And this whole definition of incel, what this means?

SORAYA CHEMALY: Well, it’s a portmanteau of the words “involuntary” and “celibate.” It was actually used for the first time by a woman in Canada in 1997 or '98, I believe, to describe her own state of involuntary celibacy, but it was never meant to be what it has become, which is a completely male-dominated statement of aggrieved entitlement, usually aggrieved sexual entitlement. She herself has bemoaned this course that it's taken, and has started an alternative organization that’s very focused on the expression of love.

What often happens is that lonely boys and men, who, you know, struggle with expression, I believe, that is tied to all kind of other issues—I write about this in the book—in that emotional regulation of men causes extreme loneliness. I mean, we talk about anger being difficult for women and detached from femininity, but anger and loneliness are thought to be part of being masculine. And it’s really destructive. It’s destructive to boys and men. It’s destructive to the society. But they start off as potentially very lonely people and then get recruited into these environments that become more and more extreme and radicalized. So you go from a person who maybe feels hurt or lonely to a person who then has a vengeful, violent and deeply misogynistic community encouraging them to do harm, either to themselves or to other people.

AMY GOODMAN: According to BuzzFeed, in one video, Beierle said he resented having to subsidize, as a taxpayer, “the casual sex lives of slutty girls” through the Affordable Care Act’s contraception provisions.

SORAYA CHEMALY: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: In the same video, he criticized the “invasion of Central American children” in the U.S.—I put that in quote, “invasion of”—

SORAYA CHEMALY: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: —and said the migrants seeking asylum should be deported on barges. Can you talk about this intersection of anti-woman and anti-immigrant hatred?

SORAYA CHEMALY: Well, it all exists on a continuum, right? And the issue for a lot of these men in these communities is not just anti-woman, but also the idea that a white woman would willingly engage in a relationship with a man who was not white. We saw that also with Elliot Rodger, who’s sort of glorified in these communities. And so, we see that in these extreme forums, but in fact we see it laundered throughout the media ecosystem, certainly on the right, where the language of our politics is infused with this fear and this denigration and disgust of people of color and of women simultaneously. And so, the idea behind marrying immigrants and feeling that they are threatening and dangerous goes hand in hand with the regulation of women. Sometimes we hear the regulation or redistribution of sex used as an expression in mainstream media, but what we’re really talking about is the redistribution of women. And eliding those two things is really unhelpful. And so we see white supremacist movements which are focused on pushing back immigrants and a sort of toxic Border Patrol mentality of jailing dark, black people in the country as a way of containing them. And we see that same language of containment and disgust in the idea that we should, you know, “lock her up,” for Hillary Clinton, or continue to control women’s reproduction as a function of a right of men, as entitlement of men to do this.

AMY GOODMAN: And he served in the military, Soraya.

SORAYA CHEMALY: Well, I mean, I think if you find comfort in rules and regulations and hierarchy and status, if that is your mindset, then you are also inclined, accordingly, to punish the people who break those rules and to feel aggrieved if you are among those who are not benefiting from those rules. And so, in the incel community, you can see the language infused with those ideas, with the idea that there are these hierarchies of men and that women are lying, manipulative, social climbers who will degrade you and deny you the right to sex, in the case of incels, because they want to scale the ladder and reward men who deserve it in other ways.

AMY GOODMAN: You know, what about the climate now? I mean, just Friday afternoon, I was watching President Obama give a speech in Tallahassee, right? He was there to support Andrew Gillum and Senator Nelson. This is in Tallahassee. It wasn’t hours later before Beierle went into this Tallahassee yoga studio. And Trump also came to Florida this weekend. In the past week, Trump revving up his anti-immigrant rhetoric, talking about the “invaders” coming, something that was cited—

SORAYA CHEMALY: Right.

AMY GOODMAN: —by Bowers, the man who shot up the Jewish synagogue in Pittsburgh. And President Trump didn’t let up. He doubled down on using those words. When the bomb letters are sent to Obama and sent to George Soros, he continues to attack Soros, Obama, and with that kind of revving up of anger against Obama, Obama in Tallahassee that day. Your thoughts?

SORAYA CHEMALY: Well, I mean, I think it’s very clear that he uses this rhetoric of violence and confrontation, and his language is deeply dehumanizing. It’s dehumanizing to people of color, to immigrants, to women. And, you know, the dehumanizing language is the first step to the humiliation, degradation and then, eventually, violence that we see against people. There’s no disconnecting the language and rhetoric that’s being used by the president from the violence that we’re seeing, the high emotional tone of our political life. And so, you know, I think to suggest, as is often the case from the White House, that there is no responsibility or no connection between the words and the actions that we’re seeing is misleading, to say the least.


https://www.democracynow.org/2018/11/5/ ... kill_women
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Mon Nov 05, 2018 3:35 pm

Incels Categorize Women by Personal Style and Attractiveness

It isn’t surprising that in a subculture where women are considered extremely shallow, stupid, and evil, women’s clothing is also deeply suspect. Incels see women as either “Stacys,” who are hyperfeminine, attractive, and unattainable and who only date “Chads” (muscular, popular men who are presumed to sleep with lots of women), or “Beckys,” the “average” woman. Women in general are also referred to in dehumanizing terms such as “femoids” or “FHOs (Female Humanoid Organism).”

One visual explainer describes a Becky as wearing “loose baggy clothing to hide small tits/flat ass” and needing to wear “super tight yoga pants to get a few looks.” She allegedly carries a “$5 backpack” and has a “nerdy bun” because she “thinks guys like the ‘natural’ look.”

Meanwhile, a Stacy has a “naturally curvy body” with “big tits and ass” that “give men instant erections.” She has “sexy, majestic long blonde hair,” her makeup is “on point” and she carries a “$2,000 Gucci bag” and “lives in luxury”:

Image

In another iteration, Becky is a feminist who “will likely die [sic] her hair green, pink, or blue after attending college” and “posts provocative pictures because she needs attention” despite being a “6/10.” Stacy, on the other hand, again has “natural blonde hair” and “shows off body online because she knows she can make big money off virgin losers”:

Image

If certain discussions on these forums are any indication, there are only two types of women in the world of incel, both of whom are white, thin, and attractive. But while incels seem to believe that the untouchable (and seemingly nonexistent) Stacy will never sleep with them, they feel as though they are owed attention and sex from Becky.


https://www.vox.com/2018/4/28/17290256/ ... tacy-becky
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:20 pm

Jordan Peterson seems to have discovered the NPC meme, and now thinks everyone who disagrees with him is basically a robot

Image
Jordan Peterson’s unconscious (artist’s conception)

By David Futrelle

So the bad news is that Jordan Peterson seems to have discovered the NPC meme, and it’s managed to burrow its way into his unconsciousness.

Read More→
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Sun Nov 11, 2018 10:40 pm

We Thought We Knew Faith, Until We Didn’t The making of a white-nationalist poster girl.

By Anna Silman

Image

At some point during her mom’s illness, she began a relationship with a guy named Josef Viezner — now her fiancé — whom she had met in passing via Toronto private-school circles. They shared a love of guns and a mutual pride in their European heritage. When I was in high school, I had heard about an incident in which Joe and some other kids had been asked to leave their all-boys school in part for their participation in a chat group that glorified the Holocaust and was filled with anti-Semitic slurs. “Joe was one of three people that was asked to leave the school for an anti-Semitic incident,” confirmed Hal Hannaford, the school principal from that time. Multiple former schoolmates confirmed that Joe had a habit of espousing anti-Semitic rhetoric. Adds one former classmate: “I wasn’t really surprised when I heard [Faith’s extremist views], and that’s because I knew Joe.” Through a lawyer, Viezner states that he is not and has never been anti-Semitic. This past February, Faith posted a birthday collage of Joe on Instagram hailing him as “the guy who makes my politics sound leftie.”

Faith’s mother died in 2014. By then, Faith was working as a reporter and commentator on Sun News, then the Fox News of Canada, where she was cast as the “token young person,” who talked about Christian morality and railed against abortion and gay rights. At least at first, people who knew Faith saw her rightward shift as flagrant opportunism, citing how different she was as soon as the cameras came on. “I don’t think Faith has ever been capable of understanding that people have real emotional feelings about social injustice,” said John Downs, who was often cast as the young liberal on Sun News panels opposite Faith. “This is just a game that she really wants to win, no matter what the consequences might be.”

After Sun News closed, Faith moved to the Rebel Media, an outlet more like Breitbart and Infowars — an ugly mix of Islamophobia and anti-immigrant messaging. She quickly became one of the network’s stars, warning the audience of the feminizing dangers of soy and the prospect of “white genocide,” arguing that “diversity might just be code for population replacement.” She spoke of a holy war between Islam and the West and called for a return to the Crusades. In January 2017, a far-right vigilante killed six worshippers at a Mosque in Quebec; at his trial, a document with his search history was produced, showing that in the month before the attack, he mainlined sources like Ben Shapiro, Richard Spencer, and Faith’s Rebel pal (and founder of the violent far-right Proud Boys) Gavin McInnes. Two days after the shooting, Faith promoted an Islamophobic conspiracy suggesting the killer may have actually been a Muslim man.

Faith was fired from the Rebel after she went down to the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville and appeared on the Daily Stormer’s Krypto Report podcast. Openly associating with neo-Nazis was apparently too much for her bosses, no matter that she had been spewing hatred on their dime for years before that. The firing seemed only to incite her further. Faith then made what Jared Holt, a reporter for Right Wing Watch, calls “a Need for Speed drift into the extreme right,” spending the next few months hanging out on white-nationalist podcasts, YouTube channels, and Gavin McInnes’s show, as well as beginning to make her own videos. In these appearances, you can see her martyr complex continuing to grow. With McInnes, she talks about how “getting burned” for exercising her free speech only emboldened her to speak out more. He cheers her on. “You see what I’m screaming folks at home, this isn’t just a journalist, this is a world leader! It doesn’t hurt that she’s an 8.97; you get the best of Melania and Donald!”

In December, in a now-removed interview with a YouTube channel called Millennial Woes, run by Colin Robertson, who argues that supporting racial equality is “clearly deluding yourself,” she doubled down on her commitment to white-nationalist beliefs. Faith, wearing a fuzzy blue-and-white Christmas sweater, spoke in awed terms about the “great conversation” happening after Charlottesville when it came to clarifying “optics” and the future direction of the “dissident right.” She describes life after being fired as “completely liberating.” Charlottesville helped her to clarify her views and see who her people were. “We don’t have many friends, but hell, we’ve got a fighting cause and we believe in our future,” she said. Faith also quoted Richard Spencer, who is one of America’s most prominent white-nationalist figureheads: “You have to be willing to become a villain in order to make change in this society.”

Image

Robertson then prompted her say the 14 words, the notorious white-supremacist slogan: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children.” The 14 words were coined by white-supremacist terrorist David Lane, who was convicted of murdering a Jewish radio host named Alan Berg. The number 14 is one of the most common ways of identifying as a white supremacist and is often seen tattooed on the forearms of skinheads and Klan members. Faith said it through giggles. “I don’t see why that’s controversial, is that bad?” she asked facetiously. “I think it’s controversial to say the opposite.”

Why did Faith take such a sharp turn toward extremism? There’s no exact moment when someone snaps; rather, it involves a complex constellation of psychological, social, and cultural factors. While there is no clear link between trauma and extremism, for some individuals, upheaval in their home lives can leave them adrift and searching for new meaning. “One of the great perceived attractions to becoming involved in extremism is it presents a simple way of understanding a complicated world,” explains Dr. John Horgan, whose research is focused on the psychology of terrorist behavior. “It’s comforting, like a warm blanket.” People who become extremists generally have a fragile sense of identity. The way Faith threw herself into Catholicism when her mom got sick may have indicated a hunger for new ideologies that could help explain her place in the world.

J.M. Berger, one of the leading experts on extremist ideologies, told me it can be helpful to think of extremist ideas as a socially transmitted disease, one that spreads particularly quickly in times of societal uncertainty. In order to catch the virus, you need both a weakened immune system and you need exposure. As Faith was exploring her newfound religiosity and grappling with the loss of her mother, she was getting serious with someone who had expressed anti-Semitic views in high school. She was also diving headfirst into a political and media landscape where the far right and mainstream right were quickly converging, and where social media was causing extremist ideology to proliferate at an unprecedented rate. “If you get into a social network where [extremist views are] on offer, then you’re much more likely to pick it up,” Berger explains. If extremism is a virus, Faith, seeing this burgeoning online white-nationalist movement as a shortcut to fame and notoriety, became a willing host for it.

Holt says becoming a far-right media personality is often a decision you can’t undo. “It can be a profitable decision to go far to the right, where the audience is very accepting and gets excited about new personalities that come on the scene, especially young women,” he said. “But because this audience is so toxic and hateful, going to that audience is sort of like your last stop on a media career. It’s like Hotel California; it’s nearly impossible to ever leave once you get in.”

Faith, like many women in the alt-right, occupies a complicated space. The movement needs women if it’s going to spread its message far and wide, but it’s also rooted in deeply misogynistic beliefs, with a fan base that derides and objectifies the women it elevates. “I know it seems a bit rich a female telling men what to do, I’d frankly rather be cooking and cleaning,” she said on the far-right Millennial Woes podcast. Later, she told professional misogynist Roosh V, on a show about “tradthots” (women who preach traditional values without living up to them), that “I, for one, have never fancied myself to be a thought leader … I’ve only seen myself as a propaganda arm, and I would hope that a lot of the women [in far-right media] see themselves as such.” Faith clearly has designs on being a leader; she always has, ever since we were little. But the nature of the alt-right means that she has to renounce her own ambitions.


Read more: https://www.thecut.com/2018/11/faith-go ... -girl.html
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Mon Nov 12, 2018 2:22 am

Susie Day

Be Vewy, Vewy Quiet, Good Old Boys Are Hunting


Image In a recent New York Times column titled "White Male Victimization Anxiety," Charles Blow described how President Trump publicly apologized to Justice Brett Kavanaugh for "the terrible pain and suffering you have been forced to endure" at the hands of Christine Blasey Ford, who claimed that Kavanaugh had tried to rape her. Blow also cited Senator Lindsey Graham's own plucky #MeToo moment during the Kavanaugh hearings, when Graham proclaimed, “I’m a single white male from South Carolina, and I’m told I should shut up."

Blow's fine op-ed piece joins a growing media chorus studying the current "victimization" of white American men. We queers can assume – since everybody else does already – that we're talking straight white American men, who, excoriated for their lapses of "politically correct" behavior, now identify as victims.

Frankly, I find the term “victim” offensive. These people are survivors! Straight white men haven't recently begun to feel victimized: they’ve felt that way since the dawn of time. It’s one of their main feelings. I know. I went to a "Make America Straight White Male Again" rally and got a free MASWMA baseball cap! This deeply moved me.

So I sat down and composed a little history for first graders, to educate them about the oppressed straight white male diaspora. To explain the patriarchy, I’ve devised an unthreatening little Elmer Fudd-type character that children of all ages are sure to love.


Read more: http://www.pmpress.org/content/article. ... 1181334952
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Mon Nov 12, 2018 8:47 am

Neo-Nazi Video Game Encourages Players To Murder Journalists, LGBTQ People, And Racial Minorities

According to trailers for Angry Goy II, the plot revolves around the kidnapping of President Trump by “left wing terrorists.” Assuming the identity of Moon Man, Richard Spencer, Christopher Cantwell, or other alt-right figures both real and fictional, players must murder scores of journalists, Antifa, Jews, blacks, and gay men in order to rescue him.

Image
Playable character “Lucca Traini” killing blacks, gays, and Jews in Charlottesville.

In one stage, the player must break into a gay club, called the “LGBTQ+ Agenda HQ,” and slaughter everyone inside. The mission is eerily reminiscent of the Pulse nightclub massacre of June 2016, wherein a single gunman murdered 49 of the club’s patrons. Considering the alt-right’s gleeful reaction to the shooting, this is probably no coincidence.

The game’s creators, who predictably conflate homosexuality with pedophilia, included posters outside the club which read “CHILDREN WELCOME” and “NAMBLA Discount,” referring to a defunct pro-pedophilia organization. Inside, the player is attacked by nude men, sometimes waving rainbow flags, and often saying — in stereotypical lisps — “Buttsex is a human right!”

Image
“The Golden One” massacres people at gay nightclub.


Read more: https://angrywhitemen.org/2018/11/11/ne ... inorities/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Tue Nov 13, 2018 7:49 pm

JUNE 6, 2018
Is Alexander Dugin an Undercover Queer Theorist?
by JOSEPH GELFER

Dugin’s presentation of sex and gender in the Fourth Political Theory bears a resemblance to a queer theory PhD dissertation from the late 1990s. So how do we get from someone who states “By going beyond the limits of gender which we know, we get to the domain of uncertainty, androgyny, and sex as practised by the angels” to someone who frames gay marriage as a sign of the end times? There are various possible explanations.

First, when writing The Fourth Political Theory Dugin strategically opted for language that could be interpreted in various ways, thus reeling in a potentially diverse readership. Second, Dugin’s worldview has genuinely become more extreme over the years. Third, Dugin has learned lessons from the alt-right and chosen to distil his message into clickbaity rage, even if it is not necessarily representative of his views.

And then there is a fourth explanation that is worth considering (with tongue firmly planted in cheek). Could it be that Dugin has been an undercover queer theorist all along and is playing a long game, positioning himself as an intellectual heavyweight on the far right in order to subvert it from within? If you think that is far-fetched, consider the following, as chronicled in Masha Gessen’s recent book, The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia. Dugin’s first wife was Evgeniya Debryanskaya, who he taught English by reading the suspiciously queer The Picture of Dorian Gray. They eventually broke up, after which Evgeniya Debryanskaya went on to become a prominent feminist and LGBT activist in Russia. This part is not in Gessen’s book: shortly before they parted ways, the young couple made a pact: “Sasha, darling. I will fight openly for the rights of women and gay people. Your task is far more difficult. You must pretend to be an ultra-nationalist until the time is right. Then we will reveal to them the joy of androgyny and sex as practised by the angels.” Stranger things have happened.


https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/06/06 ... -theorist/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)


Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:39 am

Inside the “soy boy” conspiracy theory: It combines misogyny and the warped world of pseudosciece

This is why the alt-right believes that soybeans are part of a left-wing plot against manhood


Jones has long been promoting conspiracy theories involving government operatives and “The New World Order” using products to turn male bodies estrogenic. In 2013, Jones argued that juice boxes were feminizing male children, declaring, “After you’re done drinking your little juices, you’re ready to go out and have a baby. You’re ready to put makeup on. You’re ready to wear a short skirt….You’re ready to put lipstick on.”

Jones has asserted that left-wing male commentators are often “latte addicts” and “soy addicts” who lack masculinity—and earlier this year, Jones’ colleague, Paul Joseph Watson posted an eight-minute video describing the alleged attributes of a “soy boy.”

Watson asked, “What is it about soy that turns men into such spineless wimps? Soybeans contain high amounts of phytoestrogens: organic compounds that mimic the female hormone estrogen in the human body. This reduces testosterone and lowers male sperm count.”

Watson elaborated, “Men with high estrogen take on feminine traits. They find it harder to handle stress. They become less assertive. They become low-energy. Their voices get higher, their genitals shrink.”

According to Watson’s video, “environmental estrogens” are causing males to develop female-like breasts—and one of the most prominent “environmental estrogens” is soy. The use of soy baby formulas, Watson said, suggests that “rather than people with already preexisting left-wing beliefs being attracted to vegan-style tofu soy diets, we’re actually creating an army of soy boys from birth.”

Alt-right blogger Mike Cernovich is not only a leading proponent of the bizarre Pizzagate conspiracy theory, which in 2016, claimed that Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was running a child sex ring in a Washington, DC pizzeria—he is also a strident critic of soy products, arguing that there is a correlation between liberal and progressive beliefs and use of soy products. And “soy boy” is one of his favorite insults.

Roosh Valizadeh’s misogynist Return of Kings website has also been the source of numerous anti-soy diatribes, and on April 1, 2018, Valizadeh devoted an entire article to “soy face”—an open-mouth smile the alt-right believes is specific to “soy boys.” Valizadeh wrote, “There is no doubt that decreasing testosterone levels among American men are causing them to behave in childish and feminine ways. This is most clearly displayed in the ‘soy boy face’ pose that combines the feelings of excitement and fear.”

In one on his anti-soy videos, Watson focused on “soy face” exclusively—arguing that because “soy boys” have lower testosterone, it shows in their facial expressions. Watson declared, “Look a little closer and see what soy face truly represents: weakness and fear….The globalist chemical warfare program to make men effeminate so they vote more like women and generally vote for left-wing policies and big government is still in full swing. But now that the testosterone-decimating effects of soy and plastics are being exposed, the reign of the soy boys is coming to an end.”


https://www.salon.com/2018/11/14/the-so ... s_partner/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:28 pm

Image

SURVIVORS AND ANTIFASCISTS CONFRONTING MISOGYNISTS, PROUD BOYS, AND PATRIOT PRAYER IN PORTLAND THIS SATURDAY

NOVEMBER 15, 2018

The far-right formation Patriot Prayer, and its base of Proud Boys, are again descending on Portland to try and antagonize the community. This time led by Alt Light internet personality Haley Adams, they are holding a #HimToo event in Downtown Portland on November 17th. Created in response to the growing #MeToo movement to confront unchecked sexual assault, and highlighted by the blatant misogyny of the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination hearings, Adams created the #HimToo event to give men “a day to speak about how they feel, what they have gone through,” raising the specter that false rape allegations are ruining the lives of men, which neglects the fact that false reporting is almost complete non-existent.

In response an organized coalition has created a number of events intended to compliment each other, raise the voices of affected people, and then confront the far-right directly.

Starting at 12pm, at Terry Shrunk Plaza, Pop Mob has organized an event called “Survivors Are Everywhere: A Survivor Shout Out” to show open solidarity with ALL survivors of sexual assault.

Not everyone is able to share their story. Some survivors choose to stay silent for their safety, others are silenced by those around them. Some survivors refuse to be silent.

The alt-right is trying to silence survivors, erase trans identities, control the bodies of women and people of color, and criminalize families and individuals seeking safety. WE ARE ALL SURVIVORS. As Audre Lorde said, “there is no such thing as a single issue struggle”. People are suffering multiple attacks because they belong to more than one targeted group. We are stronger when we stand together and lift up all of our voices.

Join us November 17th, as one strong, fierce, community coming together to amplify the voices of survivors who break the silence and share their stories. Stand in solidarity with survivors as we show the country that we will not back down, we will not shut up, and we will not be erased!

#SURVIVORSAREEVERYWHERE


https://antifascistnews.net/2018/11/15/ ... -saturday/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 19633
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

PreviousNext

Return to Data And Research

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest