Michael Cohen

Moderators: DrVolin, 82_28, Elvis, Jeff

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:10 am

Image

Image
Image
Image

Trump lawyer Michael Cohen just made a disastrous move in Stormy Daniels case

By Grant Stern April 25, 2018

President Trump’s personal lawyer just announced he intends to invoke his Fifth Amendment rights. Michael Cohen’s plan to ‘plead the 5th’ appeared in a sworn statement begging a California court to halt civil court proceedings in the Stormy Daniels case.

In case you’ve forgotten, Donald Trump famously told his followers at a campaign rally that only the “mob takes the 5th Amendment.” (video below)

Facebook's new algorithm changes have decimated the reach and the ad revenue of independent news sources like ours. Please become a patron of our news website and help us pay our writers by making a small contribution:
View our Patreon page >

Michael Cohen now has the dubious distinction of being the first member of the Trump inner circle – who hasn’t already been convicted of a crime – to invoke the Fifth Amendment to avoid potentially making self-incriminating statements. Ironically, it comes in a defamation lawsuit filed by super lawyer Michael Avenatti, who Daniels hired after Cohen attacked her and called her a liar in the national media.


Daniels’ lawsuit aims to get the court to invalidate her hush money deal altogether on the grounds that Michael Cohen violated federal election laws, which is just one of the potential criminal offenses Trump’s lawyer is facing. That reality is Cohen’s primary motive for his decision regarding his testimony, which he expressed in this sworn statement:


Michael Cohen’s sworn statement pleading the 5th is a milestone moment. As Trump’s fixer and keeper of secrets, he can’t be convicted in court on the basis of invoking his rights, but it is still a tacit public admission of criminal wrongdoing.


Cohen’s under investigation by the FBI and the Southern District of New York US Attorney’s office for campaign finance violations, bank fraud, and wire fraud.

Stormy Daniels’ lawyer issued this statement about Cohen’s decision.



Stormy Daniels’ complaint cites criminal wrongdoing as a legal reason to invalidate her hush money agreement with Trump since agreements must have a lawful purpose.

Cohen’s invocation of the Fifth Amendment would seem to hand Stormy Daniels the point in her battle to ditch Trumps hush money deal. Moreover, one has to wonder if Trump’s lawyer could face additional criminal charges under the Hobbs Act, a tough federal extortion law, if Daniels proves all of her allegations in court.

What makes Michael Cohen’s precipitous fall more stunning is that it just doesn’t make sense why he and/or President Trump believed that it was so important to keep his affair with Daniels secret by utilizing thuggish tactics so long after the last election.


Watch Trump’s shameful comments about Michael Cohen here:
https://washingtonpress.com/2018/04/25/ ... iels-case/




Michael Avenatti

Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen previously represented to the American people that Mr. Cohen acted on his own and Mr. Trump knew nothing about the agreement with my client, the $130k payment, etc. As I predicted, that has now been shown to be completely false. #basta

Thank you @foxandfriends for having Mr. Trump on this morning to discuss Michael Cohen and our case. Very informative.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMyh7ko9L2g



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lu_Hgw60Ns


There you go: NY prosecutors cite Trump comments on Fox this am that Cohen did “a tiny, tiny little fraction” of his legal work as reason to expedite review of seized documents

Image


Michael Avenatti

Here is a link to our motion and supporting papers to be filed this morning in the SDNY whereby we seek to intervene in order to address document issues relating to Ms. Daniels.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/xw5kiu41niku3 ... 6.pdf?dl=0
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:43 pm

Michael Avenatti

Most interesting fact from today’s hearing IMO - FBI imaged 16 (by my count) cell phones and blackberries seized in MC raids. Usually not a good sign when the target appears to have saved old phones and there are that many phones recovered. BIGLY bad...for many. #basta



The FBI just revealed the very suspicious evidence they found in Trump’s lawyer’s office
BY COLIN TAYLOR
PUBLISHED ON APRIL 26, 2018


The legal battle between President Donald Trump and his ex-mistress Stormy Daniels took a stunning turn on Thursday when the adult actress and director’s lawyer revealed that sixteen cellphones had been seized from Trump lawyer Michael Cohen’s office by the FBI.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation raided Cohen’s offices a few weeks ago, collecting evidence for the investigation into the non-disclosure agreement and hush money payment that Cohen arranged with Daniels shortly before the 2016 election – an agreement that Trump never signed and now appears to have been a major violation of campaign finance law.

Daniels’ lawyer, Michael Avenatti, took to Twitter to taunt the president and his cronies with Trump’s personal lingo over the discovery – and to hit home just how suspicious it is that Cohen had that many old cell phones stashed away in his office.


It’s hard to imagine why anyone who wasn’t involved in some kind of criminal activity would need sixteen cellphones – and it’s clear that the FBI has uncovered more than a few skeletons from Cohen’s closet. It’s likely that we’re only just scratching the surface of the criminal activity that the president and his bumbling attorney have gotten up to the over the past few decades.

Good thing he saved all the evidence for us.
https://washingtonpress.com/2018/04/26/ ... rs-office/


"Mr. Ehrlich invited Mr. Cohen to his wedding and was amused to hear he bragged to another guest that he belonged to the Russian mob."
Image
Image


Attorney Michael Avenatti hints $1.6 million abortion payout was for Trump — not GOP donor
Travis Gettys TRAVIS GETTYS
26 APR 2018 AT 09:27 ET


The lawyer for porn actress Stormy Daniels suggested that a $1.6 million hush money payoff to a Playboy model was actually made on behalf of President Donald Trump — and not a Republican donor.

Attorney Michael Avenatti appeared Thursday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” where he gave a wide-ranging interview on the lawsuit against the president and a related criminal investigation of Trump’s personal lawyer Michael Cohen — and he said reporting on the case had missed an important detail.

“So, Mika, you are familiar with the fact that a week ago, Judge (Kimba) Wood ordered Michael Cohen’s attorneys to disclose all of his clients for the last three years,” Avenatti said, “and there were three clients listed — three clients listed. Do you recall which three?”

Brzezinski listed Trump, Fox News host Sean Hannity and Republican donor Elliott Broidy — but Avenatti said she was making the same mistake everyone else had.

“No, no, no,” he said. “Mr. Trump, the Trump organization and Sean Hannity. Mr. Broidy was not disclosed in open court as one of Michael Cohen’s clients.”

Co-host Joe Scarborough asked the attorney what that meant.

“I think at some point we are going to find out, if in fact, the client in connection with the ($1.6 million) settlement was, in fact, Mr. Broidy. I’m going to leave it at that.”

Avenatti wouldn’t say it, but the implication seems clear.

Cohen negotiated a $1.6 million hush money payment to a Playboy model who became pregnant during an affair and then had an abortion.

News reports had identified Broidy as the client who agreed to pay the woman in installments over two years if she agreed to remain silent about the relationship — but Avenatti said Cohen’s lawyers ruled him out in open court.

That would leave Trump, or possibly Hannity, as the likely clients who arranged the payment.

Broidy resigned earlier this month as deputy finance chairman of the Republican National Committee after the payments were reported
https://www.rawstory.com/2018/04/attorn ... mo.twitter



Michael Avenatti

See, we can agree on things.

Image


RUMORS

Tom Arnold

one the one hand it's nice Elliott Broidy fundraises for Israel but holy moly.....


He took the fall for Trump with Bechard, didn't he?

I mean... she looks a lot like Stormy (and also Ivanka...).

Image


Brzezinski listed Trump, Fox News host Sean Hannity and Republican donor Elliott Broidy — but Avenatti said she was making the same mistake everyone else had.

“No, no, no,” he said. “Mr. Trump, the Trump organization and Sean Hannity. Mr. Broidy was not disclosed in open court as one of Michael Cohen’s clients.”

Co-host Joe Scarborough asked the attorney what that meant.

“I think at some point we are going to find out, if in fact, the client in connection with the ($1.6 million) settlement was, in fact, Mr. Broidy. I’m going to leave it at that.”
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Sat Apr 28, 2018 6:40 pm

Under the bus Michael Cohen goes..

Trump loyal newspaper destroys Cohen and Trump most likely gave the approval


Image
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue May 01, 2018 9:58 am

TWITTER TRAIL
Michael Cohen Claimed He Talked With Trump the Day of the Stormy Daniels Deal
A series of tweets undercut the idea that the president’s personal lawyer couldn’t discuss the hush-money arrangement because he couldn’t get in touch with him.

Betsy Woodruff
BETSY WOODRUFF
04.30.18 7:01 PM ET
President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Michael Cohen was in communication with the then-presidential candidate the day Cohen wired hush money to Stormy Daniels, according to previously unreported tweets.

Those tweets cast doubt on a claim that has been promulgated to distance Trump from the payments to the adult film star, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford. That claim, which was made anonymously to The Wall Street Journal, is that Cohen “missed two deadlines earlier that month to make the $130,000 payment to Ms. Clifford because he couldn’t reach Mr. Trump in the hectic final days of the presidential campaign.”

In fact, according to Cohen’s own tweets, he was in contact with Trump on the very day the hush-money deal was signed and finalized.

On Oct. 27, 2016, Cohen wired $130,000 to Daniels as part of the hush money agreement. The next day, Oct. 28, Cohen signed the agreement, according to court documents (PDF). That same day, The Hollywood Reporter posted a viral video of a homeless woman named Denise Scott who was assaulted while trying to keep vandals from defacing Trump’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

“Hey, where’s Donald at?” said one of the men harassing her.

Cohen sent a host of tweets about the story and asked for help finding the woman. He did so, he explained, at the behest of his boss.


“This is one task given to me by @realDonaldTrump that needs to be accomplished quickly,” he wrote at 11:38 p.m. on Oct. 28.


How the Feds Can Build a Case Against Michael Cohen

Did FBI Raid Michael Cohen Over Stormy Daniels?

Trump Asks Judge to Force Stormy Daniels Into Arbitration
Cohen also promised that Trump had a present for Scott.

“.@DiamondandSilk @realDonaldTrump someone please help me locate this woman as Mr. Trump has a gift for her…” he tweeted at 6:28 p.m. that same day.


When an account called @LowRider81hd tweeted about having a soft spot for the homeless, Cohen replied, “.@Lowrider81hd So do I and clearly @realDonaldTrump does as well as he has tasked me to find her. Need everyone’s help!”

Cohen’s lawyer did not respond to a request for comment for this story.

Cohen’s efforts didn’t end there. On Nov. 15 and 29, he tweeted out a crowdfunding page for Scott based on the platform SavingAmerica.com. Despite Cohen’s efforts, Scott’s life didn’t seem to turn around. Justin Best, who started a GoFundMe page to help Scott, told Fox News for a Jan. 6, 2017, story that he had trouble helping her overcome homelessness.

“I had no idea how difficult this would become,” he told Fox News. “We would find Denise, but then she would disappear again. People are very committed to helping her, but she goes back and forth between deciding she wants our help and doesn’t.”
https://www.thedailybeast.com/michael-c ... niels-deal
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue May 01, 2018 1:59 pm

Better Call Cohen: The Shady Cases of a Trump Lawyer's Personal Injury Practice

The president's personal attorney represented multiple clients in New York who allegedly staged car crashes to cheat insurance companies


A few years before he started working for Donald Trump, and long before he gave legal advice to people like Fox News personality Sean Hannity, Michael D. Cohen had a different kind of clientele. Cohen roamed the courthouses of New York City, filing lawsuits on behalf of people with little means who were seeking compensation for the injuries they suffered in car collisions. Many personal-injury lawyers make their living this way, but there was something striking about Cohen's cases: Some of the crashes at issue didn't appear to be accidents at all.

A Rolling Stone investigation found that Cohen represented numerous clients who were involved in deliberate, planned car crashes as part of an attempt to cheat insurance companies. Furthermore, investigations by insurers showed that several of Cohen's clients were affiliated with insurance fraud rings that repeatedly staged "accidents." And at least one person Cohen represented was indicted on criminal charges of insurance fraud while the lawsuit he had filed on her behalf was pending. Cohen also did legal work for a medical clinic whose principal was a doctor later convicted of insurance fraud for filing phony medical claims on purported "accident" victims. Taken together, a picture emerges that the personal attorney to the president of the United States was connected to a shadowy underworld of New York insurance fraud, a pervasive problem dominated by Russian organized crime that was costing the state's drivers an estimated $1 billion a year.

Cohen was never charged with any wrongdoing in any of these cases and there is no evidence that he knowingly filed false claims, which potentially could be grounds for criminal charges and disbarment. It was unclear whether any materials dating from his days as a personal-injury attorney were among the items seized in an April 9th raid on Cohen's offices, home and hotel room. Messages left with Cohen and his attorney were not returned.

In one case, Cohen filed a bodily injury lawsuit on behalf of a woman named Tara Pizzingrillo, who was a passenger in a car that was struck by a rented vehicle in 1999 in the Sheepshead Bay neighborhood of Brooklyn. In the 2002 complaint Cohen drafted and filed, Pizzingrillo sued the driver of the rental, Brian McFarland, claiming that she suffered bulging discs, and demanding $1 million from Enterprise Rent-A-Car's parent company, ELRAC Inc.

While the case was making its way through the courts, however, both Pizzingrillo and McFarland were indicted for their roles in a criminal ring that staged accidents using rented U-Haul trucks. Pizzingrillo, McFarland and others took turns renting U-Hauls, and, after obtaining insurance coverage, plowed them into vehicles occupied by friends in order to file bogus injury claims. Damian S. Jackson, who prosecuted the case when he worked at the New York Attorney General's office, did not recall Cohen's lawsuit, but said the events it described were typical of the ring's scheme. "They were basically being crash test dummies in each collision," Jackson says. The U-Haul ring submitted more than $350,000 in fraudulent personal injury claims before they were caught. Both Pizzingrillo and McFarland pleaded guilty to third degree insurance fraud, and Cohen's lawsuit was withdrawn. Pizzingrillo did not respond to a message seeking comment.

Not only did Cohen represent clients in staged accidents, but some of his clients may not have been in the vehicle when the phony crash occurred. Another of his clients, a Haitian immigrant named Marie Pierre, was sued by State Farm in 2001, after an investigation determined she was involved in another fraud ring that used stolen identities. "Her account of the accident is [so] completely contradicted by the police report that it must be questioned whether she was present at the event," a lawyer for State Farm wrote. Pierre testified that the black 1988 Chevrolet Caprice she was riding in was being driven by a man; the police report listed the driver as a woman. Pierre identified the driver of the other car involved in the crash as black; he was white. Pierre said the vehicle she was riding in was stopped when it was struck in 1999 on Avenue U in Brooklyn; it was moving.

In another case brought by State Farm, court documents list Cohen as the defense attorney for four individuals charged in a civil action of being part of another ring that allegedly staged at least 10 accidents in 2000 and 2001. Cohen's clients did not contest the charges that their 2001 accident was staged and State Farm was granted a default judgement. Another Cohen client, Nonna Fayerberg, was struck by a man involved in an insurance fraud ring.

At the time Cohen was representing plaintiffs involved in these fraudulent accident claims, a cottage industry of staged accidents had sprung up in New York to take advantage of the state's no-fault insurance law. The law, which required insurers to pay up to $50,000 to victims of an auto accident, had quickly attracted criminals who discovered they could collect a quarter of a million dollars by intentionally crashing a car packed with four of their friends. Even though the crashes were staged, people still got hurt. At least one deliberate crash took the life of a 71-year-old Queens woman who was killed when her car was struck by a driver attempting to commit insurance fraud.

Cohen’s first job out of law school was for Melvyn J. Estrin, who had been exploiting New York’s insurance law for decades. Back in the 1970s, Estrin sent letters to physicians encouraging them to take advantage of the state’s new no-fault insurance law and run up the medical bills on accident victims. (A U.S. Senator got hold of one of these “Dear Doctor” letters and published it in the Congressional Record back in 1976 as an example of conduct that “borders on the unethical.”) In 1995, Cohen’s last year at the firm, Estrin was indicted in a scheme to bribe insurance adjusters to inflate damage estimates and expedite claims. He pleaded guilty to second-degree bribery.

Cohen's work on behalf of accident victims was, if nothing else, prolific. In Cohen's challenge to the April 9th raid, his attorneys told a Manhattan judge that Cohen had "hundreds of different clients" from 1996 to 2006, when he ran his own private legal practice. "Negligence," which likely included the bodily injury claims filed on behalf of accident victims, then represented 90 percent of his legal work, Cohen said in a unrelated deposition obtained by Rolling Stone. Much of this work consisted of filing private arbitration claims, which are typically not a matter of public record. However, auto insurers dragged Cohen into court nearly 100 times between 1998 and 2003, asking judges to halt numerous claims he had filed for a variety of reasons, including fraud.

It's not clear how the "hundreds of different clients" Cohen represented found him. While many personal injury lawyers take out ads on TV or plaster their faces on highway billboards, Cohen kept a relatively low profile; one of the addresses he used on accident cases was a remote taxi garage in Long Island City, Queens, where he managed a fleet of yellow cabs with his Ukrainian-born business partner, Simon Garber. Investigations from the same period by insurers and the FBI found other lawyers worked within sophisticated insurance-fraud networks that could have been cooked up by Saul Goodman, the ethically compromised lawyer on the hit TV series Breaking Bad, though there is no evidence that Cohen ever knew that any of his clients were involved in these schemes. Some unethical lawyers paid "runners" or "steerers" who staged accidents or monitored the police radio, and then raced to the scene of a crash to drum up business before the ambulance arrived. Neighborhood medical clinics, often established for the sole purpose of billing insurance companies for unnecessary tests and medical services, would refer clients to lawyers in exchange for kickbacks. A 2006 report on auto insurance fraud by the New York Attorney General's office noted that "crooked lawyers are necessary to advance fraudulent lawsuits based on feigned injuries."

Incidentally, Cohen also did legal work for Life Quality Medical P.C., whose principal, according to a ProPublica/WNYC investigation, was Dr. Zhanna Kanevsky. Kanevsky was indicted in 2005 by the New York Attorney General's office on charges of insurance fraud, grand larceny and falsifying business records for her role in a fraud ring that was secretly run by a Ukrainian émigré and his wife. According to the indictment, all clinic patients were given three expensive MRI scans, kidney sonograms and nerve testing, and all received the same medical treatment, regardless of injury: physical therapy, chiropractic care and acupuncture treatments several times a week. Kanevsky pleaded guilty and lost her medical license for three years. Cohen, who was the contact attorney for any lawsuits against the clinic, was not implicated in the case. However, an attorney named Albert Rudgayzer was indicted; according to prosecutors, Rudgayzer paid the clinic owners for referring clients and then shared a part of the proceeds from settlements of bodily injury claims. He ultimately pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was ordered to pay about $120,000 in restitution and fines.

Several investigations have also found that Russian organized criminals were behind what turned out to be massive insurance fraud operations. A sprawling investigation in Suffolk County, New York that indicted hundreds of people involved in more than 1,000 phony accidents in the early 2000s was known as "Operation BORIS" – an acronym for Big Organized Russian Insurance Scam. The frauds have only grown in subsequent years. A 2012 investigation by the FBI found a Russian organized crime ring (which involved three attorneys) was behind a $275 million auto insurance fraud ring, the largest in history. (One of the defendants in that case, Michael Barukhin, moved into a Trump-branded tower in Sunny Isles Beach, Florida while his case was pending.) "Back in the Soviet days, ripping off the government may have been the single largest industry outside the military in the entire country," says James Quiggle of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud, a not-for-profit group funded by insurers. "What developed was an entire generation of hoods with very good criminal skills."
https://www.rollingstone.com/shady-case ... ce-w519679


Stormy Daniels defamation suit in New York:

U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman has set a court date for June 20 at 2:30 p.m.
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu May 03, 2018 6:38 am

Rudy made a doodie
Image


4 possible felonies from Rudy Giuliani admission:
1. $130k payment to Stormy was in-kind coordinated contribution above limits
2. Cohen was a straw donor used to cover up true source of contribution
3. False statements on financial disclosures
4. False statements on banking forms



Stormy Daniels’ lawyer Michael Avenatti just accused President Trump of the same federal crime that imprisoned former Republican Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, who was convicted of illegally structuring hush money.


Michael Avenatti just accused Trump of a federal crime after bombshell Giuliani admission

By Grant Stern May 2, 2018

Stormy Daniels’ lawyer Michael Avenatti just accused President Trump of the same federal crime that imprisoned former Republican Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, who was convicted of illegally structuring hush money to the boys he molested as an Illinois wrestling coach.

President Trump’s new lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, just dropped a bombshell admission on live cable news during an interview with Sean Hannity, saying that Donald Trump reimbursed a $130,000 hush money payment from his lawyer Michael Cohen to porn star Stormy Daniels.

Facebook's new algorithm changes have decimated the reach and the ad revenue of independent news sources like ours. Please become a patron of our news website and help us pay our writers by making a small contribution:
View our Patreon page >

Daniels’ lawyer Michael Avenatti called into MSNBC’s The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell and after a “speechless” moment on air, they dissected Rudy Giuliani’s mistaken interpretation of the campaign finance law applicable to the Stormy Daniels case.


Avenatti instantly recognized Giuliani’s statements as a potential violation of the Patriot Act, saying:

“The plot thickens, right?”

“I certainly hope that what Rudy Giuliani is not suggesting is, is that in fact, the reimbursement took place over several months, in an effort to avoid triggering a $10,000 monetary requirement relating to payments; namely if they structured reimbursement payments.”

“Again, I don’t have any basis that they did. But that statement causes me grave concern. If they structured reimbursements in amounts less of than $10,000 in an effort to potentially avoid detection; that’s a serious, serious problem.”

“That’s called structuring. It’s a violation of federal law. It’s a criminal act…”

“It doesn’t make any sense why this reimbursement took place over several months, it doesn’t make any sense unless they were trying to avoid detection.”

Structuring is a serious crime that Congress made illegal after the 9/11 attacks when they strengthened the Banking Secrecy Act to catch the money launderers funding terrorism who used small deposits to evade detection.

The penalty for a violation of greater than $100,000 in illegally structured transactions over a 12-month period is up to 10 years in prison and a $500,000 fine.


Disgraced former Republican Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison for violating the Patriot Act. He was released last year and registered as a sex offender.

Rudy Giuliani told his Fox News interviewer that Trump’s hush money payments were in fact reimbursed by the President “over the period of several months” and “funneled through a law firm.”

Depending on how the factual circumstances of Trump’s payments conform to Rudy Giuliani’s statements on Fox News tonight, the former New York Mayor’s admissions could result in the President facing unprecedented felony criminal charges very soon.


Watch Rudy Giuliani admitting to Sean Hannity that hush money payments were structured, which may violate the Patriot Act:
https://washingtonpress.com/2018/05/02/ ... admission/



GIULIANI: "I said, $130K? You're gonna, you're gonna do a couple checks for $130K."

A "couple" checks? You mean Trump split up the payment into arbitrarily chosen smaller amounts, so as to pay Cohen through a stream of disbursements with less recognizable dollar amounts? Huh.
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu May 03, 2018 1:05 pm

Rudy is very unhappy with this news

I wonder how many wire taps Mr. 9/11 executed

At least one phone call between a phone line associated with Cohen and the White House was intercepted, a source said.

Federal investigators have wiretapped the phone lines of Michael Cohen, the longtime personal lawyer for President Donald Trump who is under investigation for a payment he made to an adult film star who alleged she had an affair with Trump, according to two people with knowledge of the legal proceedings involving Cohen.

It is not clear how long the wiretap has been authorized, but NBC News has learned it was in place in the weeks leading up to the raids on Cohen's offices, hotel room, and home in early April, according to one person with direct knowledge.

At least one phone call between a phone line associated with Cohen and the White House was intercepted, the person said.

Previously, federal prosecutors in New York have said in court filings that they have conducted covert searches on multiple e-mail accounts maintained by Cohen.

Spokespeople for the U.S. Attorney's Office and the FBI in New York declined comment.

Image: Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani visit the Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Aug. 16, 2016.
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani visit the Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Aug. 16, 2016.Eric Thayer / Reuters
After the raid, members of Trump's legal team advised the president not to speak to Cohen, according to a person familiar with the discussion.

Two sources close to Trump's newest attorney, Rudolph Giuliani, say he learned that days after the raid the president had made a call to Cohen, and told Trump never to call again out of concern the call was being recorded by prosecutors.

Giuliani told Fox News Wednesday night that Trump repaid Cohen the $130,000 he used to keep the adult film star, Stormy Daniels, from going public with allegations about her affair with Trump.

Giuliani is also described as having warned Trump that Cohen is likely to flip on him, something Trump pushed back on, telling Giuliani that he has known Cohen for years and expects him to be loyal, according to two sources with direct knowledge of the conversations.

Giuliani and a lawyer for Cohen, Steve Ryan, did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The White House referred NBC News to outside counsel.

It is unclear what incriminating information Cohen could give prosecutors on Trump, if he chose to cooperate. He represented Trump and the Trump Organization in its business dealings for nearly two decades before Trump became president. Special counsel Robert Mueller is interested in any information that federal investigators in New York may pick up that would be relevant to his investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Cohen has previously said publicly that he would invoke his Fifth Amendment rights if subpoenaed to avoid incriminating himself before a grand jury and there is no indication from public filings that Cohen is cooperating in the probe.

The Cohen investigation is being led by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan and the FBI. Investigators are looking into the $130,000 transaction between Cohen and adult film star Stormy Daniels, also known as Stephanie Clifford, who allegedly had an affair with Trump more than a decade ago, and a reported payment of S150,000 from American Media Inc., publishers of the National Enquirer, to a second woman who allegedly had an affair with Trump, Playboy model Karen McDougal.

The White House has denied allegations of the affairs.


Investigators are also seeking information about the 2005"Access Hollywood" tape in which Donald Trump was heard making vulgar boasts about women.

The bureau's interest in the "Access Hollywood" tape, on which Trump bragged to host Billy Bush that he would grab women "by the p---y," was first reported by the New York Times. "Access Hollywood" is an NBC Universal television program.

Material seized from Cohen's office, hotel room and home included taped conversations, as well as cellphones and hard drives.

Cohen has asserted in court that much of the material gleaned in the raids should be protected from the eyes of prosecutors under attorney-client privilege.

Former U.S. Attorney Chuck Rosenberg, now an NBC News analyst, says there's a high bar for having a wiretap approved.

"The affidavits are typically highly detailed and carefully vetted by experienced lawyers," he said. "In all cases the wiretap must be approved by a federal judge."

Rosenberg said that wiretaps are usually approved for an investigation into a current crime and not solely for possible crimes that have been committed in the past.

"This is an exacting process where the government must demonstrate to a federal judge that there is an ongoing crime."
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/donald ... es-n871011




TRUMP REPEATS THE “TAPP” STORY LINE FROM SEASON ONE

May 3, 2018/12 Comments/in 2016 Presidential Election, emptywheel, Mueller Probe /by emptywheel
Last March 4, as it became clear the FBI was investigating him, President Trump wrote a bunch of tweets that claimed, falsely, that he had been wiretapped.

Image
Image

He even called for a “good lawyer” to make a case out of the “fact” that Obama was tapping his phone.

Image

Today, Day Two of the Don and Rudy show, NBC has an exclusive story reporting that Michael Cohen’s phones were tapped before he was raided by the FBI a few weeks ago.

It’s certainly possible that the story is true. After all, prosecutors already revealed that “the USAO-SDNY has already obtained search warrants – covert until this point – on multiple different email accounts maintained by Cohen.” They also referred to some [redacted] reason to be concerned that Cohen was destroying evidence. So it’s certainly feasible SDNY had probable cause and reason to want to wiretap mob lawyer Michael Cohen.

But within minutes of the story breaking, Rudy was on the phone with Robert Costa, making false claims that if the wiretap picked up a conversation between Trump and Cohen, as the NBC report claims based off a single source, the FBI would need to notify Trump.

Giuliani tells me he can’t confirm there were wiretaps, hasn’t been informed. But when read NBC report, he was furious. “If they picked up the president, they would have had to notify him.” Said if true, wld be a “mockery” of attorney-client privilege and “gov’t misconduct”


And Giuliani’s concerns echo advice he gave Trump as the Cohen story was breaking, to stay off the phones with Cohen because they might be tapped. something the story itself describes, attributed to “sources close to” Rudy.

After the raid, members of Trump’s legal team advised the president not to speak to Cohen, according to a person familiar with the discussion.

Two sources close to Trump’s newest attorney, Rudolph Giuliani, say he learned that days after the raid the president had made a call to Cohen, and told Trump never to call again out of concern the call was being recorded by prosecutors.


Why would this detail be included in this NBC story? It’s like a Chekhov suicide pill, unnecessary to the story in chief but useful for giving a story additional dramatic meaning [yes, I made that term up, but I’ve got a PhD in literature, so am taking license to do so].

Incidentally, Corey Lewandowski was dining with Rudy last night before he went on Hannity.

As to the report about the wiretap itself, the NBC story is sourced to:

” two people with knowledge of the legal proceedings involving Cohen” [a kind of code often used to describe defense lawyers, though there are so many involved in this wiretap that it could be any of many]

“one person with direct knowledge”

“the person ” [that is, with direct knowledge — this is the confirmation that a call to the White House got picked up]


Nowhere does the story explain why someone with knowledge of a wiretap would want to burn it.

Certainly, there are explanations that given the people involved might explain the story. Michael Avenatti has claimed to know quite a bit about the surveillance of Michael Cohen; certainly, he has had communications with prosecutors involved, not least about whether he can intervene in the case. Alternately, Rudy is still quite close to some of NY’s more unethical FBI Agents, and it’s certainly possible one of them leaked the news.

By all means, let’s entertain the distinct possibility that the President’s personal lawyer, with all his mob ties, got treated like a mob lawyer. But let’s remember that Rudy appears to have made promises he can end the investigations into the President in the short term. He’s a liar. And Trump has specifically lied about being wiretapped before. So even if Cohen was wiretapped, beware serial liars making claims about the impact of such wiretaps on the President himself.

The President who cried “wiretap” once too often should be treated with a great deal of skepticism, particularly given the way Rudy immediately used this story to attack the investigation into Cohen.

Update: And now Rudy is using the alleged wiretap to call for Sessions to investigate those who were investigating Cohen.

Rudy Giuliani called for Attorney General Jeff Sessions to intervene in the Michael Cohen case and put the people behind the probe “under investigation” in a phone call with The Hill on Thursday.

“I am waiting for the Attorney General to step in, in his role as defender of justice, and put these people under investigation,” Giuliani said, reacting to an NBC News report that phones belonging to Cohen, President Trump’s longtime personal attorney, had been tapped by investigators.


He gives up the game when he complains that FBI didn’t inform “us” of the alleged wiretap.

But Giuliani said that a wiretapping of Cohen would amount to “gross misconduct” by the government. He further alleged that “this case has been surrounded by numerous acts” that fit that description.

Giuliani added sarcastically, “And they don’t even notify us? I mean, he’s only the president of the United States.”


Rudy wasn’t representing Trump when the raid occurred.
https://www.emptywheel.net/2018/05/03/t ... eason-one/
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Fri May 04, 2018 8:27 pm

U.S. Probes Cohen Over Cash He Built Up During Campaign
Trump’s lawyer took out lines of credit to secure access to as much as $774,000 as race heated up
By Michael Rothfeld, Rebecca Davis O’Brien, Mark Maremont and Joe Palazzolo
May 4, 2018 8:04 p.m. ET
Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, gained access to as much as $774,000 through two financial transactions during the 2016 presidential campaign as he sought to fix problems for his boss, public records show.

Those transactions could factor into a broad investigation of Mr. Cohen’s business affairs
https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-probes ... 1525478682



Image
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Sat May 05, 2018 2:50 pm

COHEN received from TRUMP or acquired himself $1.24 million during the last 90 days of the 2016 election—only $130,000 of which went to DANIELS.

The STEELE dossier says (1) COHEN was running TRUMP-Russia coordination, and (2) the operation COHEN was running paid off the hackers.


Image

2/ I don't know what to do with this information—but I know GIULIANI says COHEN had no campaign role, and I know COHEN suddenly had $1.24 million in his pocket in late 2016. And some of it was earmarked by TRUMP to pay off DANIELS. What if the rest of it was *also* to help TRUMP?



3/ A recent report says COHEN did in fact go to Prague—which, if true, means both he and TRUMP lied to the nation about that trip repeatedly. That'd certainly explain why COHEN offered only an incomplete alibi and never showed anyone his passport, though he waved it around a lot.



4/ The STEELE dossier says Cohen went to Prague sometime in August/September 2016. COHEN has an alibi for only a few days within that window. COHEN claims he couldn't have been to Prague because he doesn't have a Prague stamp in his passport. But you can go to Prague without one.



5/ It's believed COHEN was in a nation from which you can travel to Prague with no stamp in the exact time-frame the STEELE dossier alleges he went there.

The only person to (allegedly) examine COHEN's passport for evidence of a Prague trip was TRUMP. Who claimed it looked fine.



6/ COHEN brought his passport on-air with HANNITY, who was secretly COHEN's client—a fact only disclosed when a federal court ordered it disclosed. Suspiciously, HANNITY never looked at the passport or asked detailed questions about its content, despite COHEN using it as a prop.



7/ If, *as the media says*, COHEN went to Prague and not only lied about it but used TRUMP and HANNITY to cover it up; and if, *as the media says*, COHEN got an unexplained $1.11 million from TRUMP and elsewhere in late 2016; STEELE's dossier may very well be *accurate* on COHEN.



8/ Another thing the media says is COHEN is in legal jeopardy for his business practices—and MUELLER will use any indictments against COHEN for such practices to force him to cooperate in the Russia probe. If that's so—and if COHEN did what STEELE said—TRUMP faces a dire endgame.



9/ TRUMP inexplicably gave COHEN $470,000 on a $130,000 bill. TRUMP is known to wildly *underpay* rather than *overpay* subordinates. These facts have led to speculation COHEN used the rest of the money for something else. But COHEN also had $774,000 more:

http://thehill.com/homenews/news/386334 ... ign-report

10/ What COHEN taking out so much money in the last 90 days of the campaign suggests is he had *massive clandestine expenditures* which *weren't* being paid for by clients of his—alleged—law practice and which could *not* come directly from TRUMP. That fits STEELE's dossier. /end



PS/ The now-acknowledged DANIELS payoff confirms that COHEN was the "fixer" TRUMP turned to when he had to secretly pay someone who could blackmail him over conduct that could destroy him professionally. So payoffs to hackers would fit *perfectly* into COHEN's *established role*.



UPDATE1/ A reader reminds me that—4 months after the Prague allegation was published—COHEN finally *did* let media see his passport. It *confirmed* that COHEN was in a nation you can travel to Prague to with no stamp—Italy—between July 9 and July 17, 2016.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/anthonycormier ... .hh56Pr8yz

UPDATE2/ At two points in the STEELE dossier, the timing of COHEN's alleged Prague trip is mentioned: one says August 2016, another August/September 2016. COHEN's documented alibi only accounts for his whereabouts from August 23 to August 29, 2016. So 54 days are unaccounted for.



UPDATE3/ It's certain that the man STEELE says preceded COHEN as Trump's designated Russia fixer, MANAFORT, had *many* passports. So COHEN would've needed multiple passports also. McClatchy reports COHEN went to Prague via Germany in August/September 2016.

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politic ... 70264.html

UPDATE4/ The unanswered questions about the $1.11 million "extra" COHEN got from TRUMP and loans have nothing to do with whether COHEN went to Prague in August/September 2016, or instead met Russians (like Papadopoulos did) in Italy. The question is whether he was paying hackers.



UPDATE5/ We know PAPADOPOULOS says every 2016 trip he took was authorized by TRUMP's campaign, meaning he was sent to Italy in March '16—where a Kremlin agent conveniently found him. We know thereafter he told TRUMP's campaign the Kremlin wanted to keep meeting in neutral cities.



UPDATE6/ So we don't know if COHEN paid hackers—but we know he was TRUMP's secret bagman; he mysteriously received enough money to do it; Kremlin sources say he did; McClatchy says he went to Prague and lied about it; and Italy—his July 2016 trip—is a Kremlin-okayed neutral site.



UPDATE7/ If you read the STEELE dossier, it says (pg. 18) the conversation about COHEN and Prague was between a Kremlin official and a compatriot—which, because of its sensitivity, was deliberately "cryptic." That's the reason the possible time-frame for Prague was rather long...



UPDATE8/ ...and why I'm not convinced COHEN's nine-day July '16 Italy trip should be seen as outside that window. COHEN was obsessed with TRUMP's '16 run and in some ways central to it; Italy was a known Kremlin meet site; why would COHEN disappear on vacation there mid-campaign?



UPDATE9/ The '16 Republican National Convention—we now know a flurry of TRUMP-Russia meetings and actions taken to benefit Putin—went from July 18 to 21, 2016. Are you telling me TRUMP's *right-hand man* went AWOL *on vacation* for the 9 days *just before* the Convention started?



UPDATE10/ Don't be surprised if we learn COHEN's Italy trip involved clandestine TRUMP-Russia meetings. A man like TRUMP doesn't let his fixer disappear on vacation for the nine days *immediately preceding* the biggest moment in his life—that'd be out of character for *both* men.



PS/ Keep this calendar of consecutive days in your head:

JULY 7-8: PAGE goes to Moscow and meets Kremlin officials. He later lies about it.

JULY 9-17: COHEN—Trump's fixer—goes on "vacation" to a known Kremlin meet-up nation.

JULY 18-21: The 2016 Republican National Convention.

https://twitter.com/SethAbramson/status ... 3436133377
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Mon May 07, 2018 9:34 am

Michael Avenatti


There is no question that you are being lied to and there is a cover-up. Compare this M. Kelly interview of David Schwartz - MC’s attorney who only spoke with approval of MC & DJT - with the most recent version of the truth. #basta



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOwOMQD-Q0Y
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Mon May 07, 2018 8:22 pm

“I’d Die for My Wife and My Kids. And This Is All Ruining Their Lives”: After Rudy’s Meltdown, Michael Cohen Grapples with His New Reality

Besieged by the media and legal bills, and feeling abandoned by Washington, friends say Cohen is in a “dangerous place.”

Emily Jane Fox
May 7, 2018 7:21 pm


Michael Cohen
By Seth Wenig/AP Photo.
On Saturday night, Michael Cohen and his wife, Laura, left their hotel room at the Regency on Park Avenue and headed to a Cinco de Mayo dinner party at a friend’s house uptown. It was intended to be a few hours of levity amid an unprecedented month. In the four weeks since a dozen agents raided his home, office, and hotel room, Cohen has occupied a surreal universe—consumed with lawyers and financial pressures, besieged by the media and the nearly ubiquitous presence of Michael Avenatti, torn apart over what this has done to his family, and approached by total strangers who offer their support for him as he walks around the Upper East Side. Donald Trump’s longtime personal lawyer, who agreed to pay porn star Stormy Daniels $130,000 in exchange for her silence about an alleged affair with the future president, has spent the intervening period alternatively going about life as usual, dining at his old neighborhood haunts—La Goulue, Fred’s—and stewing late into the night in his hotel room.

Cohen, people close to him have told me, is a fighter who is determined to prove that he is collateral damage in a larger effort to ensnarl Trump, and that he is not going to hide or cower. Sometimes, he has friends come meet with him in one of the Regency’s meeting rooms. “That is not in his nature,” one friend told me. “None of this is normal, but he’s trying to keep it as normal as he can.”

Cohen’s attempt at normalcy was complicated recently by Trump’s bizarre interview on Fox & Friends, and then exacerbated by a string of equally bewildering comments uttered last week by Rudy Giuliani, the president’s new lawyer. On Wednesday, Giuliani had told Sean Hannity that Trump had, in fact, reimbursed Cohen for the Daniels payment; the next morning, he claimed that Cohen made the payments to protect the Trump family, but also noted that the story would have come out close to the election—a convoluted answer that obfuscated questions about a potential campaign-finance violation. The Washington Post and The New York Times both reported that Trump had known what Giuliani planned to say ahead of time, but on Friday, Trump told reporters that his lawyer was new to the job and needed to get his facts straight, and he would be issuing a statement clarifying what he meant. Giuliani did, in fact, issue that statement, which reiterated that the payment did not violate campaign-finance rules because it would have been made to protect the family regardless of the election. (In March, Cohen told me in an interview: “What I did defensively for my personal client, and my friend, is what attorneys do for their high-profile clients. I would have done it in 2006. I would have done it in 2011. I truly care about him and the family—more than just as an employee and an attorney.”)

According to people familiar with the situation, Cohen’s friends told him that Trump chiding Giuliani was a signal that the president was looking out for Cohen. After all, the two have history. Cohen is one of only 46 people that the president follows on Twitter. At the end of the summer, Cohen told me that he would take a bullet for the president. But, according to these people, Cohen’s friends also warned him that at the end of the day, Trump only looks out for himself. And no matter the intention of his comments, Cohen recognizes that these interviews have complicated his legal situation. They have also added to his mental strain and financial burden. Cohen has told friends that he and his wife have lost a collective 20 pounds since the raids. According to friends of the Cohens, they have been approached by numerous friends and former clients asking if they can assist during this fraught time. The entreaties have been characterized as, “You’ve helped us so much and taken care of us. Now you need to make sure you take care of yourself.”

Cohen, indeed, has been consumed with his legal challenges. The warrants to raid his home, office, and hotel room were signed on April 8, and allowed the government until April 22 to execute the searches, according to two people familiar with the situation. But agents wasted little time, entering Cohen’s premises a little after 7 A.M. the next day. The warrants were also notably broad: they sought records related to the payment to Daniels; records about Karen McDougal, a former Playmate who also claims to have had an affair with Trump; and any records of communication between Cohen and A.M.I., the media company that owns The National Enquirer, and David Pecker, the Trump confidant and proprietor of the publication. (McDougal entered into a deal with A.M.I. during the 2016 presidential campaign cycle, effectively keeping her account from publication. In the weeks since the raids, The Enquirer put a photo of Cohen on its cover under the headline: “Trump Fixer’s Secrets & Lies.”)

The warrants also sought records related to the taxi medallions that Cohen owns, his bank accounts, loans, mortgages, L.L.C.s, communications with the Trump campaign, and communications about campaign-finance laws. The government walked away with about eight boxes of physical documents, including binders that the Cohens had punctiliously maintained, with tabs designated for each of their bank accounts and monthly statements for each one, hole-punched and placed within its correct tab, according to two people familiar with the situation. They also walked away with more than a dozen electronic devices—cell phones, iPads, laptops, external hard drives—about half of which belong to Laura and their two children. They devices contained data including study guides, photos of their kids and their friends on family vacations and posing like Charlie’s Angels, and Marvel movies downloaded to iTunes.

Since the government has started returning copies of what it seized to Cohen’s attorneys, Cohen has been spending up to 10 hours a day at his lawyers’ offices on Madison Avenue, starting at 8 or 9 o’clock in the morning, designating what they deem privileged communication between attorney and client. They are moving through the information almost as quickly as the government is giving it back to them, two people said.

For most of his life, Cohen operated out of the spotlight, making a small fortune flipping real estate and taxi medallions before falling in with Trump. His involvement with Daniels, however, has transformed him into an unlikely pop-culture curiosity. Last weekend, Cohen got the Saturday Night Live treatment, with actor Ben Stiller portraying him as a tragicomic figure, as eager to please his former boss as he is desperate to avoid prison time. Indeed, on cable-news networks, his state of mind has become something of an obsession for pundits, with constant, breathless speculation about what it might take for Cohen to “flip.” As Giuliani said Sunday morning on ABC News, he expects Cohen to cooperate with authorities, though he does not think they will be happy because, as he said it, Cohen does not have “any incriminating evidence.” He called him an “honest, honorable” lawyer. He also said that a pardon “obviously is not on the table,” though he added “that’s not a decision to be made now; there’s no reason to pardon anybody now.”

Cohen, for his part, is mostly distraught over the impact on his family, according to the people familiar with his thinking. “I live for my wife and my kids,” he tells friends. “I’d die for my wife and my kids. And this is all ruining their lives.” An inaccurate NBC News report on Thursday saying that the government had wiretapped his phone, which was corrected by the network the same day, was particularly difficult on his children, according to one person. Once they read it, it doesn’t matter if it’s corrected, he has told people. The damage, he has said, is already done. (Though he has said he’s glad they did ultimately correct it.)

Cohen himself is grappling with the fact that, in his early fifties, his life and his business will never be the same, and that he is isolated from the people in Washington around Trump, who, he has said, have been treating him as though he is “disposable.”

“I am sitting here in this nightmare,” he has told people. He has said he has had no peace since January 2017, when BuzzFeed published the so-called “dossier” that made several claims about Cohen’s interactions with Russians throughout the presidential campaign (claims he has repeatedly denied). Since the raids, however, and following Giuliani’s media blitz, two people said that Cohen feels even more alone. Friends have said that “Washington has made a huge mistake” in hanging him out to dry. “That,” one person said, “is a dangerous place for him to be.”
https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/05 ... ew-reality
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue May 08, 2018 6:22 pm

Michael Avenatti


After significant investigation, we have discovered that Mr. Trump’s atty Mr. Cohen received approximately $500,000 in the mos. after the election from a company controlled by a Russian Oligarc with close ties to Mr. Putin. These monies may have reimbursed the $130k payment.


The Executive Summary from our first Preliminary Report on Findings may be accessed via the link below. Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen have a lot of explaining to do.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/pskgpwr15r48t ... y.pdf?dl=0


emptywheel

There you go: So Cohen set up a "consulting" business to trade on Trump influence, working out of Patton Boggs. The Patton Boggs big was mostly a hash: he didn't bring THEM (much) business. But it was a way to accept this $$.


Polly Sigh

The Viktor Vekselberg [Renova, Columbus Nova] is the Russian oligarch Mueller investigators recently questioned at the airport and who @MichaelAvenatti says gave Trump atty Michael Cohen approximately $500,000 in the months following the election.

Executive Summary from @MichaelAvenatti's first Preliminary Report on Findings: Cohen inexplicably accepted these payments [totaling $500K from Russian oligarch Viktor Vekselberg] while he was personal atty to 'POTUS' & employed by the Trump Org.
Image



Andrew Prokop

Avenatti claims Viktor Vekselberg sent Michael Cohen money. Vekselberg is the Russian oligarch Mueller's investigators recently questioned at the airport.
Image



Viktor Vekselberg, Russian Billionaire, Was Questioned by Mueller’s Investigators

By ADAM GOLDMAN, BEN PROTESS and WILLIAM K. RASHBAUMMAY 4, 2018


Federal agents working with the special counsel stopped a billionaire Russian businessman, Viktor Vekselberg, at a New York-area airport this year. Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters

WASHINGTON — When the United States sought to punish Russia last month for its election interference and other aggressions, it targeted some of Russia’s wealthiest men, imposing sanctions on those viewed as enriching themselves off President Vladimir V. Putin’s government.

Now it turns out that one of the men, Viktor F. Vekselberg, was also singled out in another of the efforts to confront Russia’s election interference: the investigation led by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III.

Federal agents working with Mr. Mueller stopped Mr. Vekselberg, a billionaire businessman, at a New York-area airport this year, searched his electronic devices and questioned him, according to people familiar with the matter. They confronted him after he stepped off a private plane about two months ago, according to one of the people.

There is no indication that Mr. Mueller suspects Mr. Vekselberg of wrongdoing. But Mr. Vekselberg attended the presidential inauguration last year, and the interest in him suggests that the special counsel has intensified his focus on potential connections between Russian oligarchs and the Trump campaign and inaugural committee.

Though it is unclear what prompted Mr. Mueller’s investigators to approach Mr. Vekselberg, his widespread corporate interests and attendance at Mr. Trump’s inauguration are among the potential avenues for examination. Mr. Vekselberg also attended a December 2015 dinner in Russia where Michael T. Flynn, Mr. Trump’s first national security adviser, was also among the guests and sat beside Mr. Putin. The dinner was hosted by RT, the English-language television news network financed by the Kremlin.

Mr. Flynn was ousted weeks after the inauguration amid revelations that he misled the vice president and others about his conversations with the Russian ambassador to the United States at the time. Mr. Flynn pleaded guilty in December to lying to the F.B.I. and is cooperating with the special counsel.

Another potential area of interest for Mr. Mueller is Mr. Vekselberg’s business in Cyprus, the Mediterranean nation considered a magnet for Russian money. Mr. Vekselberg has controlled a company that has been the largest single shareholder in the Bank of Cyprus. Around the same time that Mr. Vekselberg was investing in the bank, Mr. Trump’s future commerce secretary, Wilbur L. Ross, was its vice chairman.

Mr. Mueller’s interest in Mr. Vekselberg has not been previously reported. CNN has reported that investigators for the special counsel stopped an unnamed Russian oligarch at a New York-area airport.

A spokesman for Mr. Mueller declined to comment; a lawyer and a spokesman for Mr. Vekselberg did not respond to requests for comment. Previously, the spokesman confirmed that Mr. Vekselberg attended Mr. Trump’s swearing-in as president.

Mr. Vekselberg’s ticket to the inauguration came from his cousin and business associate, Andrew Intrater. Mr. Intrater, an American who lives in New York, donated $250,000 to Mr. Trump’s inauguration, campaign finance records show.

Mr. Mueller’s investigators have questioned Mr. Intrater, according to a person briefed on the matter, though there is no indication that he is suspected of wrongdoing. A person close to Mr. Intrater said that he was encouraged to attend the inauguration by an American friend, and that he had wanted to use the trip as an opportunity to meet with business associates in Washington. Documents the person provided indicated that Mr. Intrater intended to hold business meetings during the weekend of the inauguration.

Mr. Intrater is the chief executive of Columbus Nova, an investment management firm whose biggest client is the Renova Group, Mr. Vekselberg’s sprawling conglomerate that operates in the energy sector and elsewhere.

At one point, Renova donated $50,000 to $100,000 to the Clinton Foundation.

Mr. Vekselberg, who has a net worth estimated at more than $13 billion by Forbes, has primarily made his fortune in oil and metals. And as his wealth has risen, he appears to have maintained strong ties to the Kremlin.

Mr. Vekselberg is among the select Russian oligarchs who made their fortunes in the early post-Soviet period and managed to retain wealth under Mr. Putin while others went to prison or into exile. In 2010, Dmitri A. Medvedev, the Russian president at the time, appointed Mr. Vekselberg to help lead a technology-business project near Moscow.

Mr. Vekselberg, who is believed to have a favorable relationship with Mr. Putin, was one of seven Kremlin-linked oligarchs hit with sanctions in April by the Trump administration.

The Trump administration’s decision to target Mr. Vekselberg and the Renova Group with sanctions underscored his perceived closeness to the Kremlin. The sanctions — against seven of Russia’s richest men and their companies as well as 17 top government officials — were aimed at penalizing those seen as enriching themselves from Mr. Putin’s government.

And yet, Mr. Vekselberg, a native of Ukraine, has long-running business ties to the United States. He founded Renova in 1990 as a Russian-American joint venture, according to an archived version of the company’s website.

And during a thaw in United States-Russian relations — the so-called reset orchestrated by Hillary Clinton when she was secretary of state — Mr. Vekselberg was appointed to help attract Silicon Valley investors to the technology park outside Moscow, known as Skolkovo.

“The whole country needs some sort of breakthrough,” he told The New York Times in a 2010 interview about the effort.

Mr. Vekselberg also donated to Fort Ross, a state park in California that is the site of a 19th-century Russian settlement, to keep it open during the state’s financial crunch in the recession.

After making his fortune in aluminum and oil in Siberia in the 1990s, Mr. Vekselberg, together with partners, closed in 2003 what was at the time the largest private transaction in Russian history by forming a joint oil-pumping venture with the British company BP, called TNK-BP.

But soon, BP executives came to suspect the Russian partners had close ties to the F.S.B., the main successor intelligence agency to the K.G.B., and other Russian security services. The F.S.B. classified oil field maps and closely tailed British employees. Once, during a business dispute with the Russians, BP’s office in Moscow was raided by police officers armed with assault rifles.

Amid this conflict with BP, one of Mr. Vekselberg’s partners, German Khan, turned up for a dinner with a BP executive at a remote hunting lodge in Russia with a chrome-plated pistol, according to a State Department cable published by WikiLeaks. Mr. Khan confided to the executive that he considered the 1972 film “The Godfather” a “manual for life.”

Mr. Khan, too, has crossed paths with the special counsel investigation: Alex van der Zwaan, the Dutch lawyer sentenced to 30 days in jail for lying to the F.B.I., is his son-in-law.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/04/us/p ... ation.html
Last edited by seemslikeadream on Tue May 08, 2018 6:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue May 08, 2018 6:47 pm

Olga Lautman

Looks like Michael Cohen received a shitload of money from Vekselberg an oligarch/mobster close to Putin. In Russia Vekselberg is known for his dealings w the Russian mafia as well as Deripaska, Fridman, Firtash, Mashkevich, Agalarov. All of Trumps buddies!

The Executive Summary from our first Preliminary Report on Findings may be accessed via the link below. Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen have a lot of explaining to do.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/pskgpwr15r48t ... y.pdf?dl=0


How much Kremlin money was exactly funneled into Trump via his people?

Image

Simon Kukes should also be a person of interest. Never made a contribution until 2016 when he made a series of them. Also was involved in a lawsuit w Vekselberg and Blavatnik for using mob tactics in a business deal


Olga Lautman

Image


Olga Lautman

Just these few Russian @realDonaldTrump donations equal a few million

Vekselberg -$500,000
Intrater(Vekselberg cousin) -$250,000
Blavatnik-$1,000,000
Shustorovich- $1,000,000
Kukes- $273,000
Image
Image
Image


Image




Michael Avenatti

We are just getting started...




emptywheel

Actually interested in the genesis of the 4 different Cohen stories tonight. Did Patton Boggs spring a leak?





Ari Melber

BREAKING: Michael Cohen accused of taking $500,000 from a *sanctioned* Russian Oligarch *while Trump was President* and misleading the bank about it.

This allegation comes from @MichaelAvenatti & involves the company Cohen created to pay Stormy Daniels

Implicates Bank Fraud Act
Image



Michael Cohen Took Cash From Russian Oligarch After Election

The Daily Beast can confirm Michael Avenatti’s claim made Tuesday about Trump’s lawyer.


Jeenah Moon/Reuters


The Daily Beast can confirm that Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Michael Cohen received hundreds of thousands of dollars from a company controlled by Putin-aligned Russian oligarch Viktor Vekselberg.

The allegations were initially made Tuesday by Michael Avenatti, porn actress Stormy Daniels’ lawyer, and confirmed by a source familiar with the matter.

“How the fuck did Avenatti find out?” the source asked The Daily Beast.

According to a dossier published by Avenatti on Tuesday evening, “Vekselberg and his cousin Mr. Andrew Intrater routed eight payments to Mr. Cohen through a company named Columbus Nova LLC beginning in January 2017 and continuing until at least August 2017.”

The funds, Avenatti suggested, may have been used to reimburse Cohen for the $130,000 hush payment made to Daniels in exchange for her silence about an alleged affair with Trump.

Intrater was also a donor to the Republican National Committee, where Cohen served as a deputy finance chairman. In June 2017, Intrater donated $35,000 to a joint fundraising committee for the RNC and Trump’s reelection campaign. He also gave a quarter-million dollars to Trump’s inaugural committee. (Previously, Intrater gave only to Democrats like Gov. Bill Richardson and Sen. Ted Kennedy.)

Intrater and Vekselberg have also been active investors in the U.S. technology and media sectors. Columbus Nova Technology Partners was the first and only outside investor in Gawker Media, before the company was felled by a lawsuit funded by Trump ally Peter Thiel. Columbus Nova also backed the record label of former Def Jam boss Lyor Cohen, invested in the streaming music pioneer Rhapsody, and put money behind a gig-economy site, a “genetic risk” firm, and a company called Tomfoolery Incorporated.

Vekselberg himself has holdings all over the world—including a 26.2 percent stake in Rusal, the aluminum producing giant owned by Oleg Deripaska, the Russian oligarch now infamous for bankrolling former Trump campaign boss Paul Manafort. Both Deripaska and Vekselberg were sanctioned by the U.S. government in early April. But later that month, the U.S. Treasury Department, in effect, slow-rolled the sanctions, giving companies and individuals until late October to get out of business with Rusal, which is appealing Washington’s ruling. “Given the impact on our partners and allies, we are... extending the maintenance and wind-down period while we consider RUSAL’s petition,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement.

And according to The New York Times, Vekselberg was recently questioned by federal agents working with special counsel Robert Mueller. CNN reported that those queries involved the oligarch’s payments to Cohen.

While Cohen’s lawyers refused to comment on the payments, Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani dismissed the news as Avenatti having foresaw the president’s Tuesday withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal—part of “one of the best days of the Trump presidency”—and simply trying to “stink it up as much as possible.”

In a statement provided to The Daily Beast, Columbus Nova’s attorney, Richard Owens of Latham & Watkins, sought to to distance Vekselberg from the payment but acknowledged that the payment was indeed made.

“Columbus Nova is a management company solely owned and controlled by Americans,” Owens said. “After the inauguration, the firm hired Michael Cohen as a business consultant regarding potential sources of capital and potential investments in real estate and other ventures. Reports today that Viktor Vekselberg used Columbus Nova as a conduit for payments to Michael Cohen are false. The claim that Viktor Vekselberg was involved or provided any funding for Columbus Nova’s engagement of Michael Cohen is patently untrue. Neither Viktor Vekselberg nor anyone else other than Columbus Nova’s owners, were involved in the decision to hire Cohen or provided funding for his engagement.”

Cohen and Trump’s lawyers did not immediately respond to requests for comment. But this development could put further pressure on President Donald Trump’s inner circle. If Avenatti’s analysis is correct and the payments violated federal banking law, then the Cohen could be in serious legal jeopardy. There are reportedly concerns in the president’s inner circle that Cohen could begin cooperating with investigators. The greater the legal jeopardy he faces, the greater pressure he will face to cooperate. And he wouldn’t be the only one; former national security adviser Michael Flynn and Trump campaign official Rick Gates are already cooperating with Mueller’s investigators.

Meanwhile, Avenatti is making a sport of riding Cohen in the press.

When Cohen appeared in federal court last month, Avenatti and his porn-star client were in the gallery watching. Following the appearance, Daniels crowed to a gaggle of reporters, “For years, Mr. Cohen has acted like he is above the law, he has considered himself and openly referred to himself as Mr. Trump’s fixer. He has played by a different set of rules or should we say no rules at all.”

“That ends now,” Daniels concluded.

Avenatti also filed a defamation claim against Cohen one day after Daniels’ highly anticipated 60 Minutes appearance.

Days after Cohen won a 90-day stay in Daniels’ lawsuit, and said he’d invoke his Fifth Amendment rights in the case, Avenatti filed a defamation claim against the president.
https://www.thedailybeast.com/michael-c ... itter_page


Is This How Avenatti Found Out?
By Josh Marshall | May 8, 2018 9:23 pm

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 16: Stormy Daniels' lawyer Michael Avenatti arrives to the Federal Court hearing related to the FBI raid on Michael Cohen's hotel room and office on April 16, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Yana Paskova/Getty Images)Yana Paskova/Getty Images North America
TPM Reader TH thinks he knows where Michael Avenatti got his amazingly specific details. And it sounds right to me …

I want to shed some light on tonight’s post re: Cohen/Avenatti, specifically this line:

“They’ve also confirmed the dollar amounts. So while we still don’t know where or how Avenatti got this information he must have had access to one of Cohen’s ledgers, a bank statement or perhaps an investigative document. The details are simply too specific.”

I work as an Anti-Money Laundering and Bank Secrecy Act Specialist at a financial institution. Every bank/credit union/etc will have someone who’s responsibility it is to examine transactions and file Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) with FinCEN, a department of the Treasury. This is what I do.

Upon reading Avenatti’s document, it’s obvious that he has his hands on (multiple, I think) SARs that have been filed on Cohen. They are structured almost exactly as we write them. The KYC information at the beginning is a huge tipoff. This is something every bank is required to compile when a business account is opened, and it’s what AML staff would refer back to it when examining transactions to see if the account is “behaving” differently than expected. This KYC information would never be included in a bank statement or a ledger. It would only come from a financial institution, and is what is included in SARs narratives to justify their filing. Furthermore, there’s info in the document from multiple banks. Unless Avenatti has people at multiple different banks leaking him info on Cohen (he doesn’t) it comes from a SARs.

We know from the WSJ that at least one bank has filed a SARs on Cohen:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-lawy ... 1520273701

I’m pretty gobsmacked that someone would leak SARs to Michael Avenatti, but we live in crazy times. I’ve been trying to think who all would have access, and it’s basically: FinCEN staff, law enforcement who request them, regulators, the bank staff who filed them originally, and possibly independent auditors who come in to make sure banks are filing BSA paperwork properly. My guess would be it’s someone at FinCEN doing it, but I wouldn’t bet a massive amount of money on it.

I would, however, bet massive amounts of money that Avenatti somehow has his hands on SARs filed on Cohen.

I have no idea who leaked this or whether it was a leak per se. But this is extraordinarily detailed information. It all seems accurate. I think TH is likely on the right track here.
https://talkingpointsmemo.com/edblog/is ... -found-out



Image
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Wed May 09, 2018 8:16 am

Olga Lautman
Whoa!
Alexander Shustorovich gave $1 Mil to Trump and a closer look reveals who he is..
He was tied to Viktor Mikhailov, a Russian nuclear scientist and head of Russia’s Ministry of Atomic Energy, and his company Pleiades was under scrutiny Re a uranium deal by the Clinton admin
Image
Image

Alexander Shustorovich was also engaged to Kseniya Sobchak in 2000. Her father Anatoly Sobchak was one of Putin’s mentors responsible for his rise. Putin is also rumored to be Sobchak’s godfather

Alexander Shustorovich also donated $250,000 to the Bush Administration in 2000 and his money was rejected and returned because of his close ties to the Kremlin. How the @GOP has changed and have no issues w Trump taking a $1,000,000 from him

Image

a Reagan guy cut ties w him and Bush returned funds but Trump gladly took a million. Unreal

Image

Classroom Disruptor: the proprietary tablet PC that's changing Russian schools

By JAMES SILVER

Friday 24 February 2012
This article was taken from the March 2012 issue of Wired magazine. Be the first to read Wired's articles in print before they're posted online, and get your hands on loads of additional content by subscribing online.

School number 1409 lies about ten kilometres north of Moscow city centre, in an exclusive enclave of gated communities. Through the rain-spattered windscreen, designer apartment buildings loom like an architect's brainstorm. One block of flats is shaped like a ship's sails. Another resembles industrial chimneys. A third, a crossword puzzle.

The school overlooks the vast expanse of a disused military airfield. We pull up at a security checkpoint by the gates. Under the gun-metal Moscow skies, the building leaps out with its jumble of yellow and green façades, horizontal grey stripes and deeper grey zigzags.

School 1409 is part of a hugely ambitious experiment devised by Alexander Evgenievich Shustorovich, a wealthy Moscow-born entrepreneur with top-level political connections in both Russia and the US. On the surface, Shustorovich's project is a public-spirited attempt to bring Russia's education system into the digital era. In the 2010-11 academic year, around 300 year-six pupils from 11 schools in cities across Russia, from well-heeled Moscow to the rural Siberian city of Tomsk and the mining stronghold of Magnitogorsk, were loaned a portable hybrid e-book and tablet computer with which to learn, do their homework, revise for exams and -- soon -- order lunch from the school cafeteria.

But this isn't solely a social experiment. Shustorovich, 45, wants to create Russia's next platform for digital interactions, one that his business controls. With every keystroke and swipe on his devices, he is building a giant real-time spreadsheet of personal data. Once millions of teenagers get used to learning, interacting and connecting via Shustorovich's proprietary system, then what need will this and future generations have for social networks such as Facebook? "Facebook is Facebook," he says. "But adding a social network on top of the

READ NEXT

There are some major issues with claims Russian bots swayed the election in Jeremy Corbyn's favour

There are some major issues with claims Russian bots swayed the election in Jeremy Corbyn's favour
By CHRIS STOKEL-WALKER
[educational platform] will be very easy."

The project is known as "elektronnij obrazovatelnij komplex" or E-OK, which translated literally means "electronic educational system". E-OK itself refers to the group of patents the company behind the scheme has secured in Russia (pending elsewhere) for cloud-based educational services. The devices used in the experiment were designed and built by the now-defunct enTourage Systems, based in McLean, Virginia, and marketed as enTourage eDGe -- "the world's first dualbook". Designed to be kid-proof, the device features interconnected dual touchscreens that open and shut like a book. The right-hand screen is a touch- or stylus-sensitive e-ink display for reading and writing, and the other is a colour LCD touchscreen for web access and video viewing. Its operating system is Linux with Google Android.

Unlike other electronic classroom aids, E-OK isn't designed merely to complement books and desktop PCs, but to replace everything a pupil uses to study. Connected wirelessly (and soon via 4G) to the school's year-six and -seven curricula -- with years five and eight due to be added shortly -- the devices aim to reboot how children learn, teachers teach and principals run schools. By gathering data from classroom test scores, exam results and attendance records alongside statistics from mandatory school medical checks and even food ordered by the catering staff, the system creates a real-time data chain which loops from individual schools, through regional hubs, to the Ministry of Education -- right up to the Kremlin. Last June, prime minister Vladimir Putin signed a directive ordering Russia's ministers of education and communications to evaluate and report to him personally. Both ministers have since reported back "favourably", says Shustorovich, speaking in support of E-OK's implementation in schools.

6C's teacher, Irene Razuvaeva, introduces Sergei, father to Anastasia, one of her students. The device enables parents to monitor all of their child's in-class activities, from test scores to pages or videos viewed. "You have control," says Sergei, through a translator. "Also, the device has a video camera and microphone, so if my daughter is ill she can do her lessons at home."

Provided free of charge at this trial stage, the device has proved an easy sell to schools. Not only do teachers have a digital tool for registration and marking but, in mixed-ability classrooms, pupils can move through the curriculum at varying speeds. The technology is already changing the way Irina Ilyicheva, 1409's head teacher, manages her school. The trial has shown her the project's huge potential: "The information flows from the child, to the teacher, to me and all the way to the district prefect."

Pavilion on the Ponds is a fussy, old-fashioned restaurant with starched tablecloths and waitresses in frilly aprons in an affluent residential area of Moscow. It's not perhaps the natural habitat of one of Moscow's most dynamic entrepreneurs, whose media interests range from publishing houses to the Russian version of Fashion TV.

Alex Shustorovich surges through the dining room, nodding at the maitre d' and shaking hands with other diners, before arriving at the table. Preppy and clean cut, he wears a crisp shirt and blazer and has the easy charm of the ultra-moneyed. He talks in a stream of ideas, swooping from topic to topic. Although unwilling to reveal his net worth, he is described in the Russian media as a billionaire (but does not appear in Forbes' 2011 list of World Billionaires). His US-based company Pleiades has published thousands of scientific journals in Russian since launching in 1991, and now controls about 90 per cent of the market. E-OK is Shustorovich's brainchild, and the sheer scale of his vision quickly becomes apparent. He intends to rewire one of the world's greatest bureaucracies -- the Russian state.

Over a parade of traditional local dishes washed down with shots of ice-cold vodka, Shustorovich outlines his argument: that schools have utterly failed to keep pace with technology. He plans to change that.

An American national, who divides his time between Moscow and New York, Shustorovich reveals that, in the project's second year, there are currently about 10,000 tablets in almost 300 schools in more than 40 Russian regions. "And that's a very minimal number," he says.

Ultimately he intends that every child in Russia's 50,000 secondary schools -- some 16.5 million -- will have their own tablet. "[The situation's] so fluid right now. But if we continue to get the sort of traction we're getting, eventually we'll be in every school in the country."

E-OK grew out of Shustorovich's core science publishing business -- New York-registered Pleiades Publishing Inc and its 11 subsidiaries including Akademija/Uchebnik, the division responsible for the project. The group is now the world's largest publisher of English- and Russian-language science books, journals and other education materials from the former Soviet Union, China and Japan.

Pleiades publishes 2,000 scientific journals in Russian and the results of much of Russia's domestic scientific research in 200 English-language journals. With partner Springer Science + Business Media, the group has been distributing journals electronically since 2005 (and independently since 2003), and building an interactive and social-networking engine for university students at elibrary.ru.

Shustorovich says that this laid the groundwork for the schools project. "We had three aptitudes which made us unique players," he explains. "A long history of being conversant with technology, because we produced a huge volume of scientific information.

Second, we had the experience with dealing with internet products in a financial way -- our electronic sales of scientific journals and information for universities is in the high-nineties per cent

[of overall sales]. And the third was that we knew how to develop school curricula."

His history with publishing science journals electronically taught him that technology is "a great leveller", he says. "If you go to a typical rural Russian school, the library there contains maybe a few hundred books. They're isolated, so our project becomes their first great window. In affluent schools, for 12- and 13-year-olds, a personally owned computer is almost the norm. In poorer schools, they might have access to one, but they won't necessarily own it. So when they get their hands on our device, it's transformative for the psyche."

Given that the private lives and loves of some of Russia's best-known oligarchs often turn into a soap opera, it is an achievement that Shustorovich has (mostly) managed to keep his own life off the radar. Besides science publishing, his businesses include TV and radio, cable TV and advertising -- and in June this year, he will become co-chairman of global talent management agency IMG Artists, in which he already owns a minority stake.

His Moscow and New York residences are part of a property portfolio that also includes homes in Paris and the south of France, a ski lodge in Colorado and a chalet in the Alps. "I like to keep my life out of business," he says. "There was a bit about me in the press because I was in a relationship with somebody who was very public." He's referring to his former fiancée, the 30-year-old Russian socialite and TV presenter Ksenia Sobchak, once described by The Guardian as "Russia's answer to Paris Hilton".

Her father, Anatoly Sobchak, was the first elected mayor of St Petersburg and, in 1994, he made Vladimir Putin his deputy. A picture in Shustorovich's office shows the couple with Putin, then president, at the unveiling of a monument to Sobchak senior, who died in 2000. Like Putin, president Dimitry Medvedev studied law under the former mayor at Leningrad State University.

Shustorovich clearly has good relations with key power brokers.

But when asked directly how familiar Putin or Medvedev were with the E-OK project before launch, his reply is defensive: "Not at all," he says. "How would they be familiar with it?"

Later, he adds: "The prime minister's personal vision is very much in line with ours. As far as the president is concerned, he has an initiative around modernisation in schools and -- apart from us -- there are not really any wholesale initiatives out there. Now they are both very aware of us." Shustorovich moved to the US with his parents, both scientists, when he was ten. His mother, Maria, was professor of mathematics at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf in Rochester, New York, where she was a specialist in the use of technology for learning. His father, Evgeny, was a chemistry professor at Cornell University.

Shustorovich pulled off the stunning hat trick of earning a BA, a Juris Doctor degree and an MBA from Harvard University, Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School respectively. He built up a science publishing business while in his early twenties that made him a multimillionaire. But even that pales beside the role he played in a deal that The Moscow Times described as "the deal of the century, a harbinger of disarmament and the end of the Cold War".

There is no better insight into Shustorovich's instinct for deal-making than his ability to cultivate, while still in his twenties, top-level contacts among US Republicans during the first Bush administration. This allowed him to become a pivotal player in the Megatons to Megawatts programme -- an $8 billion (£4.9 billion), 20-year agreement, signed in 1993, in which highly enriched or bomb-grade uranium (HEU) from decommissioned Russian nuc-lear warheads is being recycled into low enriched uranium (LEU) to produce fuel for civilian US reactors.

Shustarovich moved in conservative political circles as his science publishing business started to grow, meeting a range of highly influential Republicans, including Max Kampelman, formerly chief arms talks negotiator for President Reagan. It was through contacts like these that the publisher became involved in Megatons to Megawatts. He says Kampelman brought the idea to his attention but "didn't have a way of getting it across to the Russians". He continues: "Max had the support of a lot of US companies as well as the government behind him. He and I brainstormed and I came to Russia and got everyone here, from the ministers, through all the bureaucracy, up to the president, behind [the deal]."

Where the deal became controversial was when, in 1997, nuclear-energy minister Viktor Mikhailov signed a provisional agreement for a joint venture between Russia's Ministry for Atomic Energy and a commercial trader -- Shustorovich's US-registered Pleiades Inc -- to sell $4.5 billion-worth of natural uranium. The Clinton administration loudly opposed Pleiades' invol-vement -- but the deal was signed shortly afterwards, reportedly earning Shustorovich tens of millions. Yet Mikhailov resigned less than a year later amid speculation that he was sacked. Prime minister Sergey Kiriyenko appointed a new nuclear-energy minister, Yevgeny Adamov, who signed a fresh agreement, sidelining Pleiades. "There was a big fight about that," recalls Shustorovich. Pleiades filed a flurry of lawsuits, which were dropped in 1998. "I still think the

[Russian] state was wrong. But I wasn't going to fight the state."

But fighting the state -- albeit in the shape of the leviathan bureaucracy at Russia's Ministry of Education and Science -- is an apt description for what Shustorovich is now doing with E-OK. The following day, in his palatial Moscow office decorated with antique furniture, "almost across the street" from where he grew up, the entrepreneur says dealing with the Russian school system meant taking on "an extremely conservative" machine. "The system is entirely focused on not getting it wrong," he says, his seriousness somewhat undercut by Fashion TV playing on a silent flatscreen behind him. "That is its biggest strength and why it can put millions and millions of children through an education environment. But it's also its biggest drawback, in that it's not easily changed. The metaphor I like to use is that the system was set up during the time of Gutenberg, when he developed the printing press, and they've been printing that book ever since."

Books, by definition, are linear, he says. "Even the way you think of a book. Okay, you can get books on audio files, you can download your book to a reader, but it's still the same word-for-word and the same presentation style. You read the first page before the second, etc. "But the fastest way to get something done is in parallel, not linearly." His project-developers spent two years developing an electronic curriculum, which allowed children to move at variable speeds. They went through state licensing processes and extensive trials. "We graduated our first sixth-grade children, who'd been through all the grades, one to six, last year."

One of Shustorovich's biggest challenges was finding a tablet which met the stringent requirements of the Russian Ministry of Healthcare and Social Development, which restricts the amount of contact a child can have with computer screens which emit low-level radiation. Despite a national policy to connect every school in Russia to the internet, computer usage has generally been restricted to standalone IT classes and occasional research. The enTourage eDGe met the specifications he was looking for, but wasn't selling particularly well. The eDGe has a 9.7-inch touchscreen that, when written on, will digitise text. Links built into books launch applications on the LCD display or in a web browser. At the time, it retailed at $499. "[enTourage] were simply device-makers," he says. "They didn't produce content. As a result, all they could do was license books from other publishers and sell them via their device. And there was no synergy between the reader part of the device and the tablet side. It was like having a Kindle with a computer on the side. In all they'd sold about 10,000 [units]. But for us it was exactly what we needed.

Academija/Uchebnik trialled the device in schools across Russia from September 2010. Seven months later, Shustorovich bought the company. "The first version of the device which we're currently using is a bit too expensive and has memory, disc-drives and all sorts of things we don't need," he says. "We're planning that our mark two will be a different design. It will essentially be a dumb terminal. All we really need is two active screens, a video camera and a microphone. The good thing is that enTourage has intellectual property and manufacturing resources, and we wanted to get inside the code of the programs and the IP ownership they had."

Shustorovich wants the device to be used primarily for educational purposes, with other features -- such as downloadable games and movies -- as add-ons, which must be bought from third parties. But it's the system's potential impact beyond the classroom that promises to be groundbreaking. For a country the size of Russia, gathering meaningful education or health data was almost impossible, he explains. "Governments have always tried to find out how well their money's being spent. But it took huge numbers of people and enormous amounts of money and -- most importantly -- time to do this. As a result the data would arrive late, it covered very small subsets of people and, by the time they had it, it was describing yesterday's weather. Our system gives you the mechanism to monitor data in real time."

He points to an experiment now underway in school cafeterias in Magnitogorsk -- a city with about 100 schools. Data sets are being gathered on how much children spend, what they spend it on, cafeteria staffing levels, food orders and spoilage. Shustorovich's team plans to create a smart system in which meals are paid for electronically via the device, so parents can see what their children eat and keep track of their money. In the next phase, they will also be able to pre-order meals.

Similarly, the project will generate a flood of real-time health data. The development team is already working with the Ministry of Health and Social Development on state-mandated health checks which monitor a range of children's statistics, from chronic conditions such as epilepsy rates to simple weight and blood-pressure measurements -- all of which go in the E-OK system, to be accessed only by the ministry and the student's doctor.

With a wealth of transformative possibilities like these, you might assume that Shustorovich would be pushing at an open door.

The truth, however, is very different. From the start, opposition has dogged E-OK. As part of an official state experiment in e-learning, other devices are being evaluated, including an e-reader backed by former deputy prime minister Anatoly Chubais, CEO of Rosnano, the Government-owned nanotechnology giant.

Shustorovich doesn't consider the "Chubais Tablet", an e-book designed by Plastic Logic, a serious rival -- he views it as simply "an e-reader with textbooks downloaded on it" -- but Chubais presented his device personally to Putin.

Meanwhile, shortly after E-OK's trial began, a lobby group, including the chiefs of two-dozen academic publishing houses, began to petition the authorities and the media to intervene. In a letter to the then-Moscow mayor Yuri Luzhkov, they wrote: "The introduction of [E-OK] will lead to financial losses... and ultimately to the potential collapse of a number of publishing houses. We consider this project to be without merit."

In his cluttered office in central Moscow, Oleg Smolin sits behind a desk piled high with files typed in Braille. A deputy of the State Duma (the lower house of the Federal Assembly) and vice-chairman of the Committee for Education and Science, Smolin, who is blind, is a cheerleader for electronic education and an advocate for the E-OK project.

Through an interpreter, Smolin says that the suspicious nature of Russian bureaucrats has meant that the country has been catastrophically slow to embrace e-learning. "The world rating of the development of electronic technology in Russia is deteriorating," he says. "So here we have to overcome the innate conservatism of many Russian educational officials -- and the system itself."

Smolin says that there are two main reasons for the opposition to E-OK. "Number one is the bureaucratisation of the Russian education system. My friends who are school principals tell me the number of directives and the amount of paper reporting has increased about 100 times over the last 20 years. The other is corruption. There are groups, within the government, who think that they will probably profit less from this project than they are currently from regular textbooks and educational aids."

There's another reason, too, which perhaps Smolin is too tactful to raise -- namely, the way in which Shustorovich is perceived by his critics and how much, potentially, he stands to gain should the project reach all 50,000 schools.

E-OK will make Shustorovich hugely influential. If the scheme scales across the country, he will control the platform that will increasingly be the way Russian children study and prepare for exams -- as well as buy and consume music, games and movies. Just as he built a social network for 70,000 university science students, he also plans a social network around E-OK. In other words, he sees this as a way to stifle Facebook's growth in Russia, where the social-networking platform has just 5.2 million users.

With the live trial phase now complete ("we obviously lost money that year"), the second stage is underway. Akademija/Uchebnik will continue to own the computers, but will now loan them to participating schools and charge for supplying the curriculum -- "the equivalent of text books" -- from which Shustorovich expects to generate an ROI of "about five to six per cent". He will also charge a consultancy fee "of about $3,000 to $4,000" for setting up a mirror server on site and providing other set-up advice.

In the next phase, the company collects revenue not just from content use, but from so-called "out of class" data. "First, we will charge a revenue-share fee to other publishers who participate in the system," he explains. "The second revenue [stream] is services -- cafeteria and health data -- which we would get a commission for supplying. But there are a lot of other services, too, like printing out something from last year's file or specialised search -- such as if you want to find out a grade-point average for a certain group of universities - which I think we can charge for. And then, of course, there are the controlled vendors on the site, who go in the system with video games and books, for which we will get a fee."

In the fourth phase, Shustorovich will stop charging for the curriculum altogether. "Then the school district will be able to stop spending money on computers, IT [departments] and textbooks," he says. "The only thing they have to worry about is having good teachers and facilities. And because they get live data on how people are doing, they can build a better education environment -- and we have a world of revenue opportunities for that."

A month later, over coffee in a London hotel, Shustorovich is in a bullish mood. "We're developing an arrangement with the national telecoms company, Rostelecom, who are part of a federal programme to wire up all the schools, to put at least the capability for our system in every school. It doesn't mean every school is going to buy 1,000 of our devices or whatever, just that every school will be system-ready, so when they come in and say, 'We're ready,' it can instantly happen."

He knows he has pulled off a neat trick -- a dazzling business plan, attracting attention in other territories including China (where an E-OK trial is also underway), with the potential to improve kids' lives. Yet he also seems resigned to the fact that the price of doing business in Russia means that ultimately he will be forced to stand aside. "I will end up with shareholders from large state companies and all kinds of control from the Ministry of Health and everybody else," he predicts. "Ultimately you do need someone to drive the train forward. But by the time we get to the grand opening of the railroad, I'm sure there's going to be a very nicely dressed chief engineer, not me, driving the train. I'm OK with that, because there's no way this genie's going back in the bottle," he says. "I don't think education in Russia will ever be the same again. We're making too much noise."

How does E-OK work? -- "Elektronnij obrazovatelnij komplex" means electronic educational system - a platform based on patents held by Shustorovich in cloud-based educational services. -- The enTourage eDGe, described as "the world's first dualbook", is (more or less) childproof and features connected dual touchscreens that open and shut like a hardback book. -- The right-hand screen is a touch- or stylus-sensitive e-ink display for reading and writing, and the other is a full-colour LCD touchscreen for web access and video viewing. -- Using Linux with Google Android, the enTourage eDGe connects wirelessly (and soon through 4G) to the school curriculums and to third-party-content providers. -- By gathering inputs from classroom tests, attendance records and medical statistics, real-time data is created which loops from individual schools to the Ministry of Education.
http://www.wired.co.uk/article/classroom-disruptor

Another interesting article

Image
Image
Omg! It’s a small world..
another $1,000,000 donation was made by Steve Cohen who at one point worked w Felix Sater at Gruntal and Co in the 80s
Image
Image
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/02/12/b ... onner.html

Image
Image



Christina Wilkie

Must see: How Russian oligarchs like Viktor Vekselberg (in Avenatti's report) are connected to Trump and each other. Amazing work by @dallasnews >>>
Image




Michael Avenatti

And now Novartis claims they hired Mr. Cohen for “healthcare” matters (they paid him approx $1 Million). Wow - he’s a doctor as well!! Very talented guy this Mr. Cohen. #basta

Priceless = Watching all of the companies that sent money to the LLC slush fund come up with different alleged reasons for hiring Mr. Cohen – “accounting advice,” “real estate consulting,” “insight,” etc. Who knew Mr. Cohen was such a brilliant renaissance man?
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

Re: Michael Cohen

Postby seemslikeadream » Wed May 09, 2018 11:45 am

Why Did Michael Cohen Receive $500,000 from a Russian Oligarch?

“Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen have a lot of explaining to do,” attorney Michael Avenatti says.

Abigail TracyMay 8, 2018 7:11 pm
michael-cohen-fight
Michael Cohen exits a New York court on April 16, 2018 in New York City.
By Spencer Platt/Getty Imagines.
Over the last two years, a shell company set up by the president’s longtime lawyer, Michael Cohen, received more than $1 million dollars from a Russian oligarch and from several multinational corporations, according to documents obtained by multiple news outlets. The limited liability company, called Essential Consultants, was initially created shortly before the 2016 election, and was used to funnel a $130,000 payment from Cohen to the pornographic film actress Stormy Daniels, as part of an agreement to remain silent about an alleged affair with Donald Trump. On Tuesday, Daniels’s lawyer, Michael Avenatti, revealed that a bank account controlled by Essential Consultants had also received payments from Russian billionaire Viktor Vekselberg, who is the subject of U.S. sanctions; AT&T, which is currently engaged in an anti-trust lawsuit with the Department of Justice; Novartis, whose C.E.O. met with Trump in January; and a Korean aerospace company that is part of a multibillion-dollar bid to provide jets to the U.S. Air Force.

A total of $4.4 million flowed through Essential Consultants until January of this year, when The Wall Street Journal reported on the existence of the shell company. Among the transactions was a $500,000 payment from Columbus Nova, a New York-based investment company with ties to Vekselberg, which Avenatti said he believes was meant to repay the hush money Cohen paid to Daniels. “After significant investigation, we have discovered that Mr. Trump’s atty Mr. Cohen received approximately $500,000 in the [months] after the election from a company controlled by a Russian [Oligarch] with close ties to Mr. Putin,” Avenatti wrote on Twitter. “These monies may have reimbursed the $130k payment.”

Last week, one of Trump’s lawyers, Rudy Giuliani, said that the president had reimbursed Cohen for the payment, contradicting Trump’s previous statements that he had been unaware of the arrangement with Daniels. Cohen has claimed that he paid Daniels out of his own pocket, using a home-equity loan to secure the funds. According to Giuliani, Trump repaid Cohen in installments as part of a retainer-like agreement that ultimately put $460,000 to $470,000 back into Cohen’s account.

A spokesperson for Columbus Nova has denied any impropriety. “Columbus Nova is an investment management company solely owned and controlled by Americans,” a lawyer for the company and for C.E.O. Andrew Intrater said. “After the inauguration, the firm hired Michael Cohen as a business consultant regarding potential sources of capital and potential investments in real estate and other ventures.” According to The New York Times, Intrater also donated $250,000 to Trump’s inauguration, and attended the event along with Vekselberg, who is his cousin. A “person close to Mr. Intrater” told the Times that he had no idea Essential Consultants was also used to pay Daniels.

“Reports today that Viktor Vekselberg used Columbus Nova as a conduit for payments to Michael Cohen are false. The claim that Viktor Vekselberg was involved in or provided any funding for Columbus Nova’s engagement of Michael Cohen is patently untrue,” Intrater’s lawyer said. “Neither Viktor Vekselberg nor anyone else outside of Columbus Nova was involved in the decision to hire Cohen or provided funding for his engagement.”

Potentially even more explosive are the payments from AT&T, Novartis, and Korea Aerospace Industries LTD, all of which have had business involving the Trump administration. AT&T confirmed that it had paid Cohen for “insights into understanding the new administration.” Essential Consultants LLC “did no legal or lobbying for us,” the telecom company said in a statement, adding that it “was one of several firms we engaged in early 2017 to provide insights into understanding the new administration” and that the contract ended in December 2017. Novartis said Wednesday that it had been contacted in November by Robert Mueller’s team about the payments, but that it “considers this matter closed as to itself and is not aware of any outstanding questions regarding the agreement.” (Korea Aerospace could not be reached for comment.)

Avenatti’s claim follows a New York Times report last week that Vekselberg, who has ties to Vladimir Putin, was previously questioned by Mueller’s team. According to individuals familiar with the matter, investigators stopped Vekselberg at a New York-area airport and searched his electronic devices earlier this year. In subsequent raids on his hotel room and office, F.B.I. investigators seized Cohen’s financial and business records. On Tuesday, CNN reported that Mueller’s investigators had questioned Vekselberg specifically about the payments to Cohen.

The allegations are sure to compound the legal troubles facing Cohen, who is reportedly being investigated by the U.S. Attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York for campaign-finance violations and bank fraud. “I am sitting here in this nightmare,” he has told people, according to my colleague Emily Jane Fox. He has said he has had no peace since January 2017, when BuzzFeed published the so-called “dossier” that made several claims about Cohen’s interactions with Russians throughout the presidential campaign (claims he has repeatedly denied). Since the raids, however, and following Giuliani’s media blitz, two people told Fox that Cohen feels even more alone. Friends have said that “Washington has made a huge mistake” in hanging him out to dry. “That,” one person said, “is a dangerous place for him to be.”

This article has been updated.
https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/05 ... ls-payment
does announcing genocide on twitter violate terms of service?
User avatar
seemslikeadream
 
Posts: 31690
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:28 pm
Location: into the black
Blog: View Blog (83)

PreviousNext

Return to Data And Research

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest