List your entire library here

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List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Fri Oct 01, 2010 8:07 am

I'm tired of little lists of books that people recommend or happen to be reading at present. Considering the nature of this board as a place for the study of areas of intersection and liminal areas, of conjunctions between things, I object to seeing cherry picked lists of books which the internal policeman has deemed sufficiently relevant to the putative primary subject matter of the board. Therefore I suggest we simply post a rudimentary catalogue, a "list" if you will, of the books presently in our possession.

I will begin.

Deep politics and the Death of JFK, PDScott
History of the English Working Class, EP Thompson
The War on Hannibal, Livy
Mysteries From Forgotten Worlds, Charles Berlitz
Herodotus' Histories
The Quest For Timbuktoo
Fast Food Nation, Schlosser
Mass Murderer in White Coats, Lenny Lapon
Mind Bombs, Garrick Adler
The Vote, Paul Foot
The Carnivals of Life and Death, James Shelby Downard
Crossing the Rubicon, Mike Ruppert
Barry and 'the Boys', Hopsicker
The Golden Ass of Apuleius
The Age of Athelstan
The Works of Charles Fort
Ancient Greek Atheletics, Miller
Virtual Government, Alex Constantine
Lost History, Bob Parry
1066 Fulford
The Plimsoll Sensation, Nicolette Jones
The Ingoldsby Legends
Though the Heavens Fall, Stephen M Wise
The Mafia CIA and George Bush, Brewton
The Franklin Scandal, Nick Bryant
The sinister forces Trilogy and Unholy Alliance, Levenda
The Hospital Revolution, Riddington et al
The Mystical War of James Shelby Downard, Adam Gorightly
1066 Year of the Conquest, Howarth
Exploration Fawcett, Brian Fawcett
The English Settlements, Myers
Arthur and the Lost Kingdoms, Moffat
Bible
The Trojan War, Strauss
While God Slept, Kalr Eskelund
Murder Inc, Martin Short
Toxic Sludge is Good For You
Secret Societies and Psychological Warfare, Hoffman
The American Woman, Eric Dingwall
The triumph of the Political Class, Oborne
The Franklin Cover-up
The Complete Richard Hannay, Buchan
The giant book fo the Supernatural, Colin Wilson
Death in Washington, Donald Freed
The Mabinogion
Are You Dave Gorman, Dave gorman and Danny Wallace
Bare Faced Messiah, Miller
War is a Racket, Butler
Dumbing us down, John Taylor Gatto
The Book of Werewolves, Sabine Baring-Gould
Trance Formation of America, Cathy O'Brien and Mark Phillips
Celtic Myths and Legends, Lewis Spence
History of the United States, Isaac Asimov
The Hidden History of the human Race, Cremo and Thompson
The War Against Boys, Hoff-Summers
The Illustrated Sherlock holmes
Dreamer of the Day, Kevin Coogan
Friendly fire, Picknett &c.
Welcome to Terrorland, Hopsicker
The Worst Journey in the Midlands, Llewllyn
Curious Scotland, Rosie
The Matter of Wales, Morris
Scottish Walks and Legends
The Rise of New Labour, Robin Ramsay
Jackanory Tales of the British Isles
Warlords, Laycock
Bad Moon rising, Gorenfeld
Programmed to Kill, MacGowan
NATO's Secret Armies, Ganser
NASA, Nazis and JFK
History Around us, Samuels
Black Sun, Peter Moon
Diary of a Lost Girls, Kola Boof
The Wars of Alexander's Successors, 323-281 BC
Worlds Before Our Own, Steiger
Myth Religion and Mother-Right, Bachofen
JFK and the Unspeakable, Douglas
Aurel Stein, Annabel Walker
Vikram and the Vampire, Tales of Hindu Devilry, Burton
L Ron hubbard, Messiah or Madman?, Corydon Hammond and Ron DeWolf
Wilson Plot, David Leigh
The Conquest of a Continent, Bruce Lincoln
Ultimate Evil, Maury Terry
We are Not the First, Andrew Tomas
The Celtic Sources of the Arthurian Legend, coe and Young
The History of Witchcraft and Demonology, Montague Summers
Psychic Dictatorship in the USA, Alex Constantine
India Brittanica, Moorehouse
Myths and LEgends of Mexico and Peru, Lewis Spence
Dark Alliance, Gary Webb
The crusades, Bridge
The Ra Expeditions, Thor Heyerdahl
Folk Heroes of Britain, Keightley
Temples Tombs and Hieroglyphs, Mertz
Anglo-Saxon England and the Norman Conquest, Loyn
Gilbert Without Sullivan, William Schenk Gilbert
The Grand Scuttle, Van der Vat
King Arthur - The True Story, Phillips and Keatman
I didn't do it for you
At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig, Gillette
Blenheim, Spencer
Smear, Dorril and ramsay
The Decline and Fall of the roman mpire, Gibbon
Anglo Saxon England, Stenton
Gods, Graves and Scholars, CW Ceram
On Secret Service East of Constantinople, Hopkirk
The Campaigns of Alexander, Arrian
Flat Earth News, Nick Daies
The Mothman Prophecies, Keel
Kon-Tiki, Heyerdahl
Looking for Dilmun, Bibby
The Finest Legends of the Rhine
Strange Angel, Pendle
Stefano della Chiaie, Stewart Christie
Clive of India, Turnbull
Last Supper, Willan
Doomsday Book, Rattray Taylor
Skeletons of the Zahara
The Assassination of Julius Caesar, Parenti
A History of British Politics from the year 1900, Thomas
Mysteries of Britain, Lewis Spence
On the Trail of the Assassins, Garrison
Secrets of the Lost Races, Noorbergen
America BC, Barry Fell
Prose Edda
Darkness over Tibet and In Secret Tibet, Illion
Princess at the Window, LaFramboise
Professing Feminism, Patai
Enslaved, Gordon Thomas
The Brotherhood, Knight
History of the Peloponnesian War, Thucydides
Mimi and toutou Go Forth, Foden
Them, Ronson
The Best Democracy Money Can Buy, Palast
Withcraft in Britain, Hole
The rise of the Roman Empire, Polybius
The Hundred Years War, Seward
Henytrap, the Scandal, Dorril and Summers
Torture Taxi, Paglen and thompson
The Jewish War, Josephus
The Old Contemptibles, Seilland
Shockingly Close to the Truth, Moseley
The Discovery of King Arthur, Geoffrey Ashe
The tigris Expedition, Heyerdahl
Aftermath, Farago
Our Haunted Planet, Keel
World On Fire, Reed
Who Framed Colin Wallace?, Paul Foot
Impostors, Burton
The Other Mrs Jordan, Mary turner thompson
Bakewell History of Latin America
Folio society Icelandic Sagas
The Occult Causes of the Present War, Lewis Spence
Men Beasts and Gods, Ossendowski
Whizzer and Chips annual 1982
Inside the Brotherhood, Martin Short
Ballads and Ballad-Poems
Aku-Aku, Heyerdahl
The Control of Candy Jones, Bain
Not of this World, Kolosimo
The Hittites, Gurney
Australia, Ward
The Shaver Mystery and the Inner Earth, Timothy Green Beckley

Now your turn.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Fri Oct 01, 2010 12:48 pm

Dude, I own several thousand books, not to mention pamphlets, leaflets, one-sheets, xeroxes, 'zines, etc. I wouldn't know where to begin. I'll have to think on this one for a while.

Also - don't you own a dictionary? I think I have at least four, including a second edition of Websters. I think you're being selective here...

ON EDIT: Okay, I checked with a more discerning eye and I don't have several thousand, but let's just call it "a fuckload" I'll see what I can do if I have a fit of insomnia.
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Sun Oct 03, 2010 8:32 am

barracuda wrote:Dude, I own several thousand books, not to mention pamphlets, leaflets, one-sheets, xeroxes, 'zines, etc. I wouldn't know where to begin. I'll have to think on this one for a while.


What's the point in having more than you could read in a year?

Also - don't you own a dictionary? I think I have at least four, including a second edition of Websters. I think you're being selective here...


I don't own a dictionary, no. I do own a computer, though. I left out a book of selections from Pliny's letters because I couldn't see it from where I was sitting, a book about how to speak Polish, maybe a Latin-English dictionary which may or may not still be under my bed, a few books I only own due to university (four set books, I think, and the same number of readers), some books I have on the computer but not on paper. Also a book I got from work which I can't remember the name of. Also some things which aren't books, 'zines as yo say. Half a dozen or so of Shavertron. A few Paranoias. A private Eye and a WSC. A few Fortean Times. An old computer game, a point and clicker, called Broken Sword: Shadow of the Templars. Some notebooks full of my scrawlings. A building society pass book. A co-op share account book. Instruction booklet for digital camera. Owner's manuals for two bikes. A pamphlet about tuning a guitar. There, comprehensive enough methinketh.

ON EDIT: Okay, I checked with a more discerning eye and I don't have several thousand, but let's just call it "a fuckload" I'll see what I can do if I have a fit of insomnia.


According to the numbers at the side of gedit my list above was 163 books. By my estimate it takes up about fifteen cubic feet against the wall. 5'x3'x1'.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Sun Oct 03, 2010 1:49 pm

Stephen Morgan wrote:What's the point in having more than you could read in a year?


I have more than one book in my library which I suppose might take more than a year to read by themselves, if one were to be conscientious about it. This one, for example:

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I have any number of books which require patient translation which I am saving for a later period of my life when I may just grow some patience. I also have books which I hope to read when I get around to them some day, as well as books which I have no intention of ever reading at all, some of which are simply beautiful objects as objects.

I don't own a dictionary, no. I do own a computer, though. I left out a book of selections from Pliny's letters because I couldn't see it from where I was sitting, a book about how to speak Polish, maybe a Latin-English dictionary which may or may not still be under my bed, a few books I only own due to university (four set books, I think, and the same number of readers), some books I have on the computer but not on paper. Also a book I got from work which I can't remember the name of. Also some things which aren't books, 'zines as yo say. Half a dozen or so of Shavertron. A few Paranoias. A private Eye and a WSC. A few Fortean Times. An old computer game, a point and clicker, called Broken Sword: Shadow of the Templars. Some notebooks full of my scrawlings. A building society pass book. A co-op share account book. Instruction booklet for digital camera. Owner's manuals for two bikes. A pamphlet about tuning a guitar. There, comprehensive enough methinketh.


Ah ha - I knew you were holding out on me.

According to the numbers at the side of gedit my list above was 163 books. By my estimate it takes up about fifteen cubic feet against the wall. 5'x3'x1'.


Some quick figuring around my living room just now revealed about twice that number, with a huge group uncounted in my bedroom, and several large stacks in the basement, not to mention the shared family library at my mothers home a few miles away, which I have availed myself of since birth and which holds many of my personal books, consisting of two 7' x 5" shelving units filled to capacity and one smaller 5' x 3' unit. My collection of paper ephemera is a whole 'nother story.

I don't particularly think I have a lot of books. I have lost equal numbers of volumes more than once due to evictions and various scenes of dispossession. It's actually looking like I have around five hundred or so here at my house if I don't include the shelf of childrens' books. But I am certainly not the hard-core collector of books in my family. My brother has two sixty-foot storage units which hold the overflow from his collection, and they are tightly packed, awaiting a more permanent home. I kid you not. Compared to him, I'm a piker, strictly small-time. But you have raised an issue for me, which is that I either need to build some more shelving in my house, or edit down the collection, as the piles on the living room floor are beginning to grate on my nerves. My daughter builds little play houses out of them which I try to discourage. Bad for the bindings.
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Montag » Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:06 pm

I agree with Barracuda, I have hundreds though, not thousands of them. I'll have to do this in many many posts. Just to get the ball rolling, I'll start with something:

Behold a Pale Horse, William Cooper
Open Veins of Latin America, Eduardo Galeano
Book of the Hopi, Frank Waters
The Wretched of the Earth, Franz Fanon
Pirate Utopias, Peter Lamborn Wilson
Poverty of Philosophy, Karl Marx
Best Democracy Money Can Buy, Greg Palast
Life of the Mind, Hannah Arendt
Socialism Today and Tomorrow, Michael Albert and Robin Hahnel
Through Time Into Healing, Brian Weiss
Swann's Way, Marcel Proust
Popular Defense and Ecological Struggles, Paul Virilio
Fortunate Son, J.H. Hatfield
Living My Life Vol. 1, Emma Goldman
The Terror Conspiracy, Jim Marrs
The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt
Friendly Fascism, Bertram Gross
The Age of Extremes, Eric Hobsbawm
Women Culture and Politics, Angela Davis
Inventing a Nation, Gore Vidal
The Power Elite, C. Wright Mills
Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, Jimmy Carter
Founding Brothers, Joseph J. Ellis
Here I Stand, Paul Robeson
Jitterbug Perfume, Tom Robbins
The Washington Connection and Third World Fascism, Chomsky and Edward S. Herman
The Illuminati, Mark Dice
Statism and Anarchy, Mikhail Bakunin
The Theory and Practice of Third World Solidarity, Darryl C. Thomas
Eichmann in Jerusalem, Hannah Arendt
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:12 pm

Alright, here's the bedroom:

Song of Hiawatha, Longfellow
Handbook of California Legislature
More Animal Stories, CGD Roberts
Pocket Book of Great Drawings, Paul Sachs
The Big Knockover, Dashiell Hammett
Loaded Dice, John Soares
Howl and other poems, Allen Ginsberg
Hjortens Flugt, Christian Winther
Rome, W. Ward Fowler
Essays, first series, Ralph Waldo Emerson
Elementary French Grammar, Larousse
In Search of Truth, John Widtsoe
Cooking To Kill, Prof. Ebenezer Murgatroyd
Dali's Moustache, Dali & Halsman
Love Poems, edited by Peter Washington
Erotic Poems, edited by Peter Washington
The Pocket Gem Pronouncing Dictionary
How To Be An Entertainer, Clarence Herisko
The Magic Mirror, McLoughlin Bros.
An Anthology, La Monte Young
Women Write Erotica, edited by Lonnie Barbach
The Bridges of Madison County, Robert James Waller
First Steps in Geometry, Wentworth and Hill
Complete Works of Sherlock Holmes, Vol I and II
Arbor House Treasury of Mystery and Suspense, edited by Bill Pronzini
The Franklin Scandal, Nick Bryant
Dhalgren, Samuel Delany
The Cultural Cold War, Frances Stonor Saunders
The Singularity is Near, Ray Kurzweil
Intensity, Dean Koontz
Early Greek Vase Painting, John Boardman
Rigorous Intuition, Jeff Wells
Middlesex, Jeffery Eugenides
UFOs and the National Security State, vol. II, Richard Dolan
In the Name of Sanity, Lewis Mumford
The Manchurian Candidate, Richard Condon
The Long Goodbye, Raymond Chandler
Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice, Mark Plotkin
A Dictionary of Symbols, JE Cirlot
The Early Work of Aubrey Beardsley
Modern Art, Trewin Copplestone

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As fun as this is, I'm thinking that maybe it's entirely too intimate a project to continue. I feel as though my soul is being bared on a streetcorner.
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby elfismiles » Sun Oct 03, 2010 4:09 pm

Here is an outdated by about 1000 fewer books, old list of my non-profit lending library's collections indexed at LibraryThing.

We currently have about 2500 books with another couple hundred in the same space belonging to Austin Mufon, another couple hundred belonging to our host INACS and about another 2500 belonging to the Jung Society of Austin.

ANOMALY ARCHIVES at LibraryThing
http://www.librarything.com/catalog/Ano ... ourlibrary
goodbye farewell adieu au revoir ciao auf Wiedersehen adios sayonara buhbye tata laters
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:17 pm

Walter Benjamin wrote:And the non-reading of books, you will object, should be characteristic of all collectors? This is news to me, you may say. It is not news at all. Experts will bear me out when I say that it is the oldest thing in the world. Suffice it to quote the answer which Anatole France gave to a philistine who admired his library and then finished with the standard question, “And you have read all these books, Monsieur France?” “Not one-tenth of them. I don’t suppose you use your Sèvres china every day?”
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Montag » Mon Oct 04, 2010 1:45 am

Breaking Open the Head, Daniel Pinchbeck
1984, George Orwell
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Hunter S. Thompson
Out of Body Experiences, Robert Petersen
The End of Suffering, Russell Targ
Suns of God, Acharya S
Dictionary of Philosophy, Dagobert Runes
12th Planet, Zecharia Sitchin
Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut
Decline of American Power, Immanuel Wallerstein
Civilization One, Christopher Knight and Alan Butler
Multitude, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri
Mindfulness, Bhante Gunaratana
Lolita, Vladmir Nabokov
The Culture Industry, Theodor Adorno
Our Posthuman Future, Francis Fukuyama
Planet of Slums, Mike Davis
Summerhill, A.S. Neill
Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
Hell's Angels, Hunter S. Thompson
Discovering the Mysteries of Ancient America, Frank Joseph
The Rum Diary, Hunter S. Thompson
The Cosmic War, Joseph P. Farrell
History and Class Consciousness, Georg Lukacs
Happy Birthday Wanda June, Kurt Vonnegut
Pulp, Charles Bukowski
The Four Agreements, Don Miguel Ruiz
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Mon Oct 04, 2010 9:04 am

barracuda wrote:I have more than one book in my library which I suppose might take more than a year to read by themselves, if one were to be conscientious about it. This one, for example:


Decadent. Inefficient use of language. Poor communication skills that Lawrence. Probably all that time he spent talking foreign.

I have any number of books which require patient translation which I am saving for a later period of my life when I may just grow some patience. I also have books which I hope to read when I get around to them some day, as well as books which I have no intention of ever reading at all, some of which are simply beautiful objects as objects.


Decadent. Content is the important thing. Except with the illustrated Sherlock Holmes.

Ah ha - I knew you were holding out on me.


Just saving my typing hands.

Some quick figuring around my living room just now revealed about twice that number, with a huge group uncounted in my bedroom, and several large stacks in the basement,


Oh, bedroom, is it? "Basement", is it? Who are you, Elton John? Lah-di-dah. &c.

not to mention the shared family


Oh, family, is it ...

library at my mothers home a few miles away, which I have availed myself of since birth and which holds many of my personal books, consisting of two 7' x 5" shelving units filled to capacity and one smaller 5' x 3' unit. My collection of paper ephemera is a whole 'nother story.


I live in the same town as a library too.

I don't particularly think I have a lot of books. I have lost equal numbers of volumes more than once due to evictions and various scenes of dispossession. It's actually looking like I have around five hundred or so here at my house if I don't include the shelf of childrens' books. But I am certainly not the hard-core collector of books in my family. My brother has two sixty-foot storage units which hold the overflow from his collection, and they are tightly packed, awaiting a more permanent home. I kid you not. Compared to him, I'm a piker, strictly small-time. But you have raised an issue for me, which is that I either need to build some more shelving in my house, or edit down the collection, as the piles on the living room floor are beginning to grate on my nerves. My daughter builds little play houses out of them which I try to discourage. Bad for the bindings.


I have myself severely reduced the size of my collection. Repeatedly. Generally followed, or occasionally preceded, by new books arriving to fill the gaps.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Mon Oct 04, 2010 9:33 am

Looking at some of these makes me thing I should start a "list all the books you've given away/sold/lost" thread. Trouble is I haven't kept a list. I used to have about twice what I've got now and then got it down to five or six. And most of the ones I've got now have replaced others.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Montag » Mon Oct 04, 2010 2:10 pm

Insurgencies, Antonio Negri
The Celestine Prophecy, James Redfield
A People's History of the United States, Howard Zinn
After Liberalism, Immanuel Wallerstein
Ten Days that Shook the World, John Reed
Many Lives Many Masters, Brian Weiss
Blowback, Chalmers Johnson
The Conquest of Bread, Peter Kroptkin
The Basic Bakunin, Mikhail Bakunin
The Revolution of Everyday Life, Raoul Vaneigem
A World Without Meaning, Zaki Laidi
A Call to Conscience, Martin Luther King
Nickel and Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich
Opening to Channel, Sanaya Roman
The Soft Machine, William S. Burroughs
The Job, Daniel Odier
Guy Debord, Len Bracken
Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe
Devil on the Cross, Ngugi
Anarchism and Other Essays, Emma Goldman
The Power and Glory, Graham Greene
The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Alex Haley
Essential Works of Lenin, Vladimir Lenin
The New Class War, Frances Fox Piven
The Society of the Spectacle, Guy Debord
Guy Debord, Anselm Jappe
A Look at Leninism, Ron Taber
Anti-Oedipus, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari
America: Who Really Pays the Taxes? Donald Bartlett and James Steele
Marx Beyond Marx, Antonio Negri
The Undermining of the Sandinista Revolution, Gary Prevost and Harry Vanden
Dateline Havana, Reese Erlich
Anarchist Voices, Paul Avrich
Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paolo Freire
Nationalism and Culture, Rudolf Rocker
The Situationist International Anthology, Ken Knabb
Farewell to the Working Class, Andre Gorz
Russian Peasants and Soviet Power, M. Lewin
The CLR James Reader, Anna Grimshaw
The Ra Material Book I, Don Elkins
Black Marxism, Cedric Robinson
Zerowork Vol. 2
Remaking Society, Murray Bookchin
The Portable Karl Marx, Eugene Kamenka
Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan
The Pioneers, James Fenimore Cooper
Molecular Revolution, Felix Guattari
Into the Wild, Jon Krakauer
Family of Secrets, Russ Baker
All the President's Men, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce
What is Philosophy, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari
Reflections on Violence, Georges Sorel
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Mon Oct 04, 2010 2:53 pm

Stephen Morgan wrote:Decadent. Inefficient use of language. Poor communication skills that Lawrence. Probably all that time he spent talking foreign.


I'm missing the reference here - "Lawrence"?

Decadent. Content is the important thing. Except with the illustrated Sherlock Holmes.


Not sure there. I was a typesetter for years, and I own some books merely as type specimens of unusual fonts, leadtype faces, layouts, papers, ornaments, etc. But meaning is more important than content anyway. Many of my books are catalogs of images, art histories, monographs of artists, or works of art in and of themselves. A minor favorite in my collection is the "Blank Book" published by Altoan Press in 1967. But then I enjoy Ad Reinhardt's paintings very much as well. I suppose it's a matter of taste. I must admit, I find your taste in books to be more than somewhat dry. I can see that we'll have very little overlap.

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Just saving my typing hands.


Decadent. Who are you, Bernie Taupin?

Oh, bedroom, is it? "Basement", is it?


Yes, my home has both a bedroom and a basement. Weird, huh? Surprising what they could do with a 650 sq ft building in 1906.

Oh, family, is it ...


Sorry, I realized only in retrospect that I shouldn't have brought that up around you.

I live in the same town as a library too.


Really? Are the librarians still surprised when the very image of Rubeus Hagrid walks in the door looking to check out the latest socialist romance novel?

Stephen Morgan wrote:Looking at some of these makes me thing I should start a "list all the books you've given away/sold/lost" thread. Trouble is I haven't kept a list. I used to have about twice what I've got now and then got it down to five or six. And most of the ones I've got now have replaced others.


I was thinking of the list of books I consider myself as still yet owning, but which have been lent out to friends for years. I need to get some of those back. Well, as Shakespeare famously said, "To borrow, to borrow and to borrow, the creeps in this petty place from day to day keep taking my goddamn books and never bringing them back." Another inefficient user of language. He could have said it just once, ferchrissakes.
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Tue Oct 05, 2010 3:29 pm

barracuda wrote:
Stephen Morgan wrote:Decadent. Inefficient use of language. Poor communication skills that Lawrence. Probably all that time he spent talking foreign.


I'm missing the reference here - "Lawrence"?


DH, as in your picture of the book of.

I must admit, I find your taste in books to be more than somewhat dry. I can see that we'll have very little overlap.


Not sure what you mean. I try to keep my books dry, certainly, due to a traumatic childhood happening, when an ornate box of old coins and a Sega Master System II (with Alex Kidd in Miracle World built in, the original way of things before Sonic came along) were badly damaged by a leaky water tank.

Presumably your books are wet, soppy, effete, not filled with honourable tales of derring-do.

Just saving my typing hands.


Decadent. Who are you, Bernie Taupin?


Just lazy.

Oh, bedroom, is it? "Basement", is it?


Yes, my home has both a bedroom and a basement. Weird, huh? Surprising what they could do with a 650 sq ft building in 1906.


I lived in a house like that once. Condemned gas fires, rotten floorboards, roof installed by cowboys on a council grant, massive case of rising damp despite several damp courses installed by cowboys payed for by the council, leaking water tank, asbestos shed, no lock on the back door, it was LUXURY it was. Even had a toilet at the end of the garden, althougn no plants. Nice view over the main road outside. Subsidence, couldn't afford firm soil around my end, ooh no. Cellar flooded in winter. Nice horribly stained tin bath. TWO black and white portable TVs. I might be the only man alive to have played Alex Kidd in black and white.

Much more morally upright now, nice leaky roofed bedsit, windows don't keep the wind out, paint all peeling off, constant harrassment by the landlords in clear violation of my rights as a tenant. I expect if I was ever to top the council house waiting list and get such a place, which were intended (I refer you to The Road to Wigan Pier by George Orwell, which is a book I used to own) to improve the living conditions of working-class slum dwellers, I would feel very guilty about having displaced some needy small businessman who could've made his ill-gotten wealth go further with a long-term council tenancy, or some drug addict or other scumbag who's put themselves in trouble and got themselves to the top of the list, or a fecund family of foreigners who get in due to the EU's open borders policy and then go into overcrowded accomodation which give them priority on the waiting list.

But I'm sure you don't want to hear about my problems.

Oh, family, is it ...


Sorry, I realized only in retrospect that I shouldn't have brought that up around you.


I've got a family. One of my earliest memories is of being in the bath while my grandad tried to use a screwdriver to unscrew the lock. And I've got a relatively rich uncle, used to be in regular employment and everything, who won't act as a guarantor on a rental agreement because he's too worried about his credit. That sort of thing, you know. The usual. Still, there's one agreeable member of my family which is myself. MYself virtually brought me up single handed, you know, as my mother was mostly an alcoholic after she got out of that mental hospital, or perhaps ward.

I live in the same town as a library too.


Really? Are the librarians still surprised when the very image of Rubeus Hagrid walks in the door looking to check out the latest socialist romance novel?


I don't read novels, man. Well, very occasionally. You'll notice a couple of works of fiction on my list in the OP, although I recently gave away the last novel I read, Robert Rankin's "A Dog Called Demolition". I suppose novels are wet and my dislike is more indication of my inherently dessicated nature. Ho-hum.

Stephen Morgan wrote:Looking at some of these makes me thing I should start a "list all the books you've given away/sold/lost" thread. Trouble is I haven't kept a list. I used to have about twice what I've got now and then got it down to five or six. And most of the ones I've got now have replaced others.


I was thinking of the list of books I consider myself as still yet owning, but which have been lent out to friends for years. I need to get some of those back. Well, as Shakespeare famously said, "To borrow, to borrow and to borrow, the creeps in this petty place from day to day keep taking my goddamn books and never bringing them back." Another inefficient user of language. He could have said it just once, ferchrissakes.


My thoughts exactly. Unpleasant sort of bloke, him. Took good and interesting old stories like MacBeth and turned them into fiction. And he was a Freemason. If he existed, which he didn't. Or he did but he wasn't him. He was Francis Bacon. Or John Dee. Or Jack Dee. Or Francis Drake. But he didn't write all them plays and that anyway. Can't've done. He was a woman, you know. Women can't write. Can't've been him, her.

Neither a borrower nor a lender be, especially of books. Money I don't care too much about, if I don't get it back it don't worry me, but I wouldn't be lending people books.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Tue Oct 05, 2010 5:20 pm

Stephen Morgan wrote:DH, as in your picture of the book of.


Dude, that's a picture of Lord Byron from the frontispiece of his complete works. You should have figured that out by the six letters above the portrait roundel, B-Y-R-O-N-S. Unless I've missed something, and he used to moonlight as DH Lawrence.

Presumably your books are wet, soppy, effete, not filled with honourable tales of derring-do.


They are somewhat limpid, as you may have ascertained by the water damage and foxing on the attachments I've posted here. But there are, mixed among the fopperies, a few moments of manly gusto - sort of as if my collection were the Scarlet Pimpernel of small personal libraries.

But I'm sure you don't want to hear about my problems.


On the contrary, the travails of life in your part of the world of the mind make for fascinating readings at times. It's some of your opinions which I've found disagreeable. That can't be helped, I suppose.

I've got a family. One of my earliest memories is of being in the bath while my grandad tried to use a screwdriver to unscrew the lock. And I've got a relatively rich uncle, used to be in regular employment and everything, who won't act as a guarantor on a rental agreement because he's too worried about his credit. That sort of thing, you know. The usual. Still, there's one agreeable member of my family which is myself. MYself virtually brought me up single handed, you know, as my mother was mostly an alcoholic after she got out of that mental hospital, or perhaps ward.


You are a stalwart. Sorry to hear about the relatives. Mine aren't much better in some ways, though the immediate group is at least a cheerful bunch, always ready to mockingly come to each other's aid, as it ought be.

Neither a borrower nor a lender be, especially of books. Money I don't care too much about, if I don't get it back it don't worry me, but I wouldn't be lending people books.


Ah, but if any man will sue thee at the law, and take away thy coat, let him have thy cloak also. Or whatever. Never really understood why you'd give away all your outergarments to then stand by and shiver righteously in the rain. Anyway.

Now on to the living room. Top shelf-and-a-half or so:

A Kentucky Cardinal, James Lane Allen
Wonder Book Of The World's Progress, vol. IV - Inventions
Billy Baxter's Letters, Wm J. Kountz
A Heap of Livin', Edgar A. Guest
Audels Carpenters and Builders Guide
Silas Marner, George Elliot
The New Spirit, Havelock Ellis
Beyond the Curtain of Dark, edited by Peter Haining
Slouching Towards Bethlehem, Joan Didion
A Summer With the Little Grays, H.W. P.
Life, edited by Rossiter Johnson
Klingsors letzter Sommer, Hermann Hesse
The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Shakespeare
The Middle Span, George Santayana
Greek Science, Benjamin Farrington
Great Engravers: John Raphael Smith, edited by Arthur M. Hind
Performance Anthology, editors Loeffler and Tong
Last Year at Marienbad, Alain Robbe-Grillet
The Sweet Cheat Gone, Marcel Proust
Differential and Integral Calculus, George Osbourne
Pipe and Pouch - The Smoker's Own Book of Poetry, edited by Joseph Knight
Postminimalism, Robert Pincus Witten
The Past Recaptured, Marcel Proust
A Picture is a Picture, W.G. Rogers
Kleine Gedichte In Prosa, Baudelaire
Latin - First Year, Magoffin & Henry
Human Physiology, Worthington Hooker
Strive and Succeed, Horatio Alger, Jr.
Michigan Trees, Charles Herbert Otis
Prater Violet, Christopher Isherwood
Gems from Emerson
Science in Our World of Progress, Hunter and Whitman
Le Biciclette, Fermo Galbiati
Bicycles and Tricycles: An Elementary Treatise on Their Design and Construction, Archibald Sharp
Bury Me Deep, Harold Q. Masur
The Tradition of the New, Harold Rosenberg
Circles of Confusion, Hollis Frampton
The Book of Tells, Mike Caro
Frankford Arsenal Statistical Manual, C.W. Churchman
The Elements of Electrical Transmission, Olin Jerome Ferguson
The Thirteen Steps to the Atom, Charles-Noel Martin
Learning From Las Vegas, Robert Venturi
Dali by Dali
The Sense of Sight, John Berger
The Devil in Massachusetts, Marion L. Starkey
The Erasers, Alain Robbe-Grillet
The Art of Performance, Gregory Battcock

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The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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