List your entire library here

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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Montag » Wed Oct 13, 2010 2:34 pm

Hmmm... Looks like Stephen, Barra and me, are the only ones willing to divulge our libraries.

Here's my final list, and that's it. I think I said I have hundreds of books. I sold a lot in the past couple years, I think I have over a hundred -- not sure I have hundreds though.

Rethinking Social Policy, Christopher Jencks
Naked Lunch, William S. Burroughs
Small is Beautiful, E.F. Schumacher
Democracy and Poverty in Chile, James Petras
Empire or Republic, James Petras
Millennium, Hakim Bey
In Defense of History and Class Consciousness, George Lukacs
The Color of Politics, Michael Goldfield
Agape Agape, William Gaddis
Soviet Marxism, Herbert Marcuse
The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
Future Primitive, John Zerzan
The Revolution Betrayed, Leon Trotsky
A Thousand Plateaus, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari
History of the Bolshevik Party, Grigorii Zinoviev
Workers Control and Socialist Democracy, Carmen Sirianni
Marx Before Marxism, David McLellan
The Guattari Reader, Gary Genosko
The Culture of Terrorism, Noam Chomsky
Profit Over People, Noam Chomsky
Walter Rodney's Intellectual and Political Thought, Rupert Charles Lewis
The Politics of Urban Liberation, Stephen Schecter
Chaosmosis, Felix Guattari
Timequake, Kurt Vonnegut
Empire, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri
Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes
Galapagos, Kurt Vonnegut
Steal This Book, Abbie Hoffman
Facing Reality, Grace Lee Boggs
Open Sky, Paul Virilio
Socialism: Utopian and Scientific, Frederick Engels
Capital Vols. 1 and 2, Karl Marx
Junky, William S. Burroughs
Queer, William S. Burroughs
Interzone, William S. Burroughs
Civil Disobedience, Henry David Thoreau
Negri on Negri, Antonio Negri
Modern Politics, CLR James
The Pentagon of Power, Lewis Mumford
Worker-Student Action Committees in May '68, Fredy Perlman
The Enrages and the Situationists in May '68, Rene Vienet
God and the State, Mikhail Bakunin
The Tibetan Book of the Dead
The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many, Noam Chomsky
Temporary Autonomous Zones, Hakim Bey
The New Military Humanism, Noam Chomsky
Keeping Faith, Cornel West
Square Dancing in the Ice Age, Abbie Hoffman
The Prince, Niccolo Machiavelli
Beyond Good and Evil, Friedrich Nietzsche
Why Work?, Various Writers
Globalization and Its Discontents, Sakia Sassen
Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser
Forbidden Archeology, Michael Cremo
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Wed Oct 13, 2010 6:02 pm

Stephen Morgan wrote:You may not. Back when I was young I was coerced by the powers that be into be therapised. Didn't like it at all. A few years ago, when I was sent on the government's New Deal scheme for the young and unemployed I overheard a rather vulgar conversation in which someone else who had also been therapised by the same psycho-logist was talking about how he had got himself kicked out of her therapising facility. I just didn't go back. One for the non-violent resistance, me.


I wouldn't advise anyone to get "therapised", unless they happen to be a Theropod. Even then, I'd probably just recommend some off-time at a local spa.

Everyone knows yetis, which is an imperialist and colonialist and racially offensive name for the almasty people, are libertarians. Besides, they hibernate, don't they? They're as nesh as you.


The word "almasty" means "wild man", so if you are thinking that this is an eponym accepted by the cryptid hominids of the Caucasus Mountains, you'd be mistaken. Don't ever say that in front of them. And while I'll admit that the term "yeti" isn't much better, I'd assert that the name refers to a related but entirely different cryptid population of indeterminate political persuasion beyond "isolationist".

It's probably indicative of some major psychological defect.


It's not unique in that regard.

It's just meant to construe my long-suffering exasperation. It only seems to have come into effect since I started posting on this board, judging by a cursory examination of the previous decade's Usenet postings.


Well, as a fellow board member, I think it's nothing less than my duty to let you know that it makes you sound like a girl. A small one, with ribbons in her pigtails.

Just cappin on you. Actually it sounds a bit matronly.

And what does petite mean? In this context?


Dainty, like gramma's doilies.

Otherwise I generally post as I speak, but having excised the dialect terms and with quite a lot of letters which would be dropped were I to type phonetically. Very thick regional accent normally, me.


It does shine through in your prose. I do not post as I speak, really. I tend to curse, fear to say. I happen to speak the colloquial No-Californese of Santa Cruz surf-tongue and Silicon Valley/spanglish vernacular, but since every major character in every tee vee and movie show speaks essentially the same dialect as I, I have come to consider my local lingo as the earth's universal language of love and psyops. But I do miss the days when Transatlantic was the predominant preferred pigdin of the entertainment business. I used to have a little handbook primer around here of the proper pronunciations, "Teach Yourself Transatlantic" or something like that, but it seems lost to the darkness of the past.

I'm telling you, it doesn't


Does too.

Luckily I don't generally whore myself for cash. The love of money being the root of all evil and that.


I know what you mean. I've been unemployed myself. This too will pass, unfortunately.

Now for the real excitement. I believe, for the most part, that I've cataloged all the books which belong to me in the living room. Understand that I have not counted the many books which belong to my daughter, and which increase the size of the stacks dramatically. But I think this is it for that room...

Hidden Treasures, Leigh and Leslie Keno
A Treasury of Science, edited by Shapley Rapport and Wright
Orders of Magnitude, Frank W. Anderson, Jr.
Key Monuments of the History of Art, H.W. Janson
Byron's Complete Works
Strange But True Baseball Stories, Furman Bisher
Better Homes and Garden's Handyman's Book
The Standard Book of Essential Knowledge, edited by Franklin J. Meine
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
Fifty Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship, Salvador Dali
An American Dictionary of the English Language, Noah Webster
Prehistoric Art and the Art of the Near East, Ariane Ruskin
Sofonisba Anguissola, Ilya Sandra Perlingieri
Paul Klee, Mark Rosenthal
Michelangelo's Last Judgement, Margaretta Salinger
The Tibetan Book of the Dead
The American Animated Cartoon, Gerald and Danny Peary
Design by Accident, James F. O'Brien
The Human Figure in Motion, Eadweard Muybridge
Eros in Pompeii, Michael Grant
Collecting Modern, David Rago & John Sollo
The Tantric Way, Ajit Mookerjee and Mahu Khanna
The Louvre, edited by Carlo Ludovico Ragghianti
Old and New Plant Lore, Smithsonian Institution Series
100 Years Of Magic Posters, Charles and Regina Reynolds
The Three Blind Mice, Agatha Christie
Plymouth Service and Technical Manual for 1965
Renoir, Nicholas Wadley
Monet, Charles F. Stuckey
American Impressionism, William H. Gerdts
O California, Stephen Vincent
Impressionism and Post Impressionism, Bessanova and Williams
The I Ching, Wilhelm/Baynes, forward by Carl Jung
Tauton's Building Stairs
The Girl Who Played With Fire, Steig Larsson
Art Nouveau Posters and Graphics, Roger Sainton
Yves Saint Laurant, Yves Saint Laurant and Diane Vreeland
Famous Portraits, edited by L. Fritz Gruber
The History of World Sculpture, Germain Bazin
Medallion World Atlas
French Impressionism, Kelder
The Shape of Time, George Kubler
Remarks on Color, Ludwig Wittgenstein

's.jpg


Montag wrote:Hmmm... Looks like Stephen, Barra and me, are the only ones willing to divulge our libraries.


Elfismiles gave us his, but it's sort of not fair, as I believe he works in a library or something. And I understand the reticence of others to join in the fray - I don't begrudge the better part of their tawdry valor. Besides, almost no one ever comes down here to the outlying territories of the Subject Forums. You've gotta be hard core.

The basement is the next destination on my journey of dust jackets and discovery.
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Montag » Wed Oct 13, 2010 7:37 pm

Elfismiles gave us his, but it's sort of not fair, as I believe he works in a library or something. And I understand the reticence of others to join in the fray - I don't begrudge the better part of their tawdry valor. Besides, almost no one ever comes down here to the outlying territories of the Subject Forums. You've gotta be hard core.


I'm not hardcore, I just click view new posts and all the fora come up...
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Thu Oct 14, 2010 8:48 am

Montag wrote:The Culture of Terrorism, Noam Chomsky
Profit Over People, Noam Chomsky


Used to have two of his books, one of them was Pirates and Emperors old and new.

Steal This Book, Abbie Hoffman


I think I used to have a book by that German who wrote "Don't Read This Book", van Helsing.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead


I think I had that. I certainly had the Egyptian book of the Dead, tr. E A Wallis Budge. And Mitchell-Hedge's Danger, My Ally which is fascinating.

Globalization and Its Discontents, Sakia Sassen


I had one by the same name with a different author.

Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser
Forbidden Archeology, Michael Cremo


Overlap!

barracuda wrote:I wouldn't advise anyone to get "therapised", unless they happen to be a Theropod. Even then, I'd probably just recommend some off-time at a local spa.


There is one of those south of Newark. Big country house place, I go past it sometimes. I don't think I'd like that sort of therapeution either. Manicures and that. Maybe those little fishes that eat your dead skin cells. Bits of cucumber on your eye lids. Thrice no.

The word "almasty" means "wild man", so if you are thinking that this is an eponym accepted by the cryptid hominids of the Caucasus Mountains, you'd be mistaken. Don't ever say that in front of them. And while I'll admit that the term "yeti" isn't much better, I'd assert that the name refers to a related but entirely different cryptid population of indeterminate political persuasion beyond "isolationist".


I think all the overly hairy fellahs are the same, whether yeti or almasty or orang pendek or manimal or sasquatch or bigfoots or yowie. Probably from some realm parallel to our own, rather than living in trees. I don't see how else one could turn up on the Shropshire Union Canal.

It's probably indicative of some major psychological defect.


It's not unique in that regard.


Of course I'd rather be of a deviant psychological nature given the sadistic nature of the standard mindset of modern society.

It's just meant to construe my long-suffering exasperation. It only seems to have come into effect since I started posting on this board, judging by a cursory examination of the previous decade's Usenet postings.


Well, as a fellow board member, I think it's nothing less than my duty to let you know that it makes you sound like a girl. A small one, with ribbons in her pigtails.

Just cappin on you. Actually it sounds a bit matronly.


That's not too bad. I was going for a Stephen Fry sort of thing, but that's near enough.

And what does petite mean? In this context?


Dainty, like gramma's doilies.


You funny talking foreigners with your funny little ways.

It does shine through in your prose. I do not post as I speak, really. I tend to curse, fear to say. I happen to speak the colloquial No-Californese of Santa Cruz surf-tongue and Silicon Valley/spanglish vernacular, but since every major character in every tee vee and movie show speaks essentially the same dialect as I, I have come to consider my local lingo as the earth's universal language of love and psyops. But I do miss the days when Transatlantic was the predominant preferred pigdin of the entertainment business. I used to have a little handbook primer around here of the proper pronunciations, "Teach Yourself Transatlantic" or something like that, but it seems lost to the darkness of the past.


I hear the Americans, and from what I read on the internet also the disguised Canadians, talking on the telly all the time. From around here no-one, or near enough. Stephen Fry and John Prescott from not too far away, at opposite ends of the spectrum. I believe I've previously protested against Fry's condemnation of regional language and local locutions. I'm not in the same league as the rural types who, when on the local news, need to be subtitles so we townsfolk can know what they're jibbering about. I still often find myself needing to speak slowly and clearly for the local poshies, though.

I'm telling you, it doesn't


Does too.


Not.

I know what you mean. I've been unemployed myself. This too will pass, unfortunately.


I find my unemployment somewhat baffling. Just the other day some girl I know was saying that she'd had an interview with Argos for the temp work at Christmas, whereas I'd also applied and never heard a thing about it. Bunch of bastards. And she's functionally illiterate and innumerate, and obviously has never lasted long in any of her previous jobs. I certainly wouldn't hire her. I'd hire me, though. The application form wasn't even one of those with pages of idiot questions like "Why do you want to work for us" or "give an example of how you've succeeded in team work". That sort of bullshit. As you might expect I don't tend to hear back from jobs where I've filled in those.

Strange But True Baseball Stories, Furman Bisher


I used to have "The Curiosities of Cricket". And football.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams


Had the one about the fish. Heard the radio version, very good.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead


Again.

The basement is the next destination on my journey of dust jackets and discovery.


I wondered why it was all smoky the other day in town. Turns out four thousand "cubic tonnes" of wood went up in flames at the other end of the road. Goes to show one doesn't always know what is happening around the local area.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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the right tool for the right job

Postby annie aronburg » Sat Oct 16, 2010 2:07 am

Stephen Morgan wrote:I actually own a pair of hair cutting scissors. Which I use to cut my nails. Occasionally sellotape or the packaging of bacon.


Stephen, you may use this forum to air your peculiar opinions about women, Jews and vegetables but I will not stand by silently while you brag about your abominable misuse, nay, abuse of scissors.

Treat yourself to some nail clippers and kitchen shears.

No more washing your face in a frying pan or combing your hair with a wagon wheel, either.
"O Oysters," said the Carpenter,
"You've had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?'
But answer came there none--
And this was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one.
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Re: the right tool for the right job

Postby Stephen Morgan » Sat Oct 16, 2010 3:19 am

annie aronburg wrote:
Stephen Morgan wrote:I actually own a pair of hair cutting scissors. Which I use to cut my nails. Occasionally sellotape or the packaging of bacon.


Stephen, you may use this forum to air your peculiar opinions about women, Jews and vegetables but I will not stand by silently while you brag about your abominable misuse, nay, abuse of scissors.


Statistics lead me to believe my opinions on vegetables are widely shared.

Treat yourself to some nail clippers and kitchen shears.


Those curly nosed flat bladed clipper things? An affront against man and god. Never has human invention been so intolerably abused. It is obvious to me that the only righteous double bladed cutting implement is the scissor.

No more washing your face in a frying pan or combing your hair with a wagon wheel, either.


I wouldn't put water in a fry pan, it might was away the accumulated tastes in the grease. As for the other, I'm not sure if you mean the chocolate and marshmallow confection known as a wagon wheel, which would be an impractical combing implement due to lacking teeth, or if you think I'm Desperate Dan and comb my hairs with the spokes of the wheel from an open wagon. If I was a comic character it would most likely be Tony Broke from Ivor Lott and Tony Broke (later merged with Millie O'Naire and Penny Less). Perhaps Buster, the title character in Buster. Supposedly the son of Andy Capp. Always thought there was a Buster Capp in yo' ass joke there.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Sat Oct 16, 2010 9:19 pm

Stephen Morgan wrote:There is one of those south of Newark. Big country house place, I go past it sometimes. I don't think I'd like that sort of therapeution either. Manicures and that. Maybe those little fishes that eat your dead skin cells. Bits of cucumber on your eye lids. Thrice no.


I hasten to agree with you. I never was one for the laying of vegetables upon my eyelids, if a cucumber really is a vegetable at all, something I am most suspicious of in the first place. But a manicure mightn't hurt you, if you're really trimming your nails with hair-cutting scissors. I must say, I'm getting a far better impression of your library than of your habits concerning personal hygiene. I would strongly encourage you to bathe regularly and with soap, and to brush your sensitive incisors after each meal of boiled potatoes.

I think all the overly hairy fellahs are the same, whether yeti or almasty or orang pendek or manimal or sasquatch or bigfoots or yowie. Probably from some realm parallel to our own, rather than living in trees. I don't see how else one could turn up on the Shropshire Union Canal.


Ah, a subscriber to the parallel dimension theory. Not me. I live quite near the northwestern Pacific rainforest, and I suppose it might be possible for a large mammal that had any good sense to avoid people quite easily, at least around here.

Of course I'd rather be of a deviant psychological nature given the sadistic nature of the standard mindset of modern society.


Of course you would. I understand entirely.

That's not too bad. I was going for a Stephen Fry sort of thing, but that's near enough.


Wasn't he the guy that played Oscar Wilde in some film version of the poor fellow's life?

You funny talking foreigners with your funny little ways.


And this whole time I'd been visualizing you as the foreigner. Just goes to show how wrong a guy can be.

I'm not in the same league as the rural types who, when on the local news, need to be subtitles so we townsfolk can know what they're jibbering about. I still often find myself needing to speak slowly and clearly for the local poshies, though.


I love to hear the way you Englanders talk. Can't quite get what you're up to most of the time, but it never fails to amaze me that you're actually speaking basically the same kind of words we do, by and large, even though they sort of come out all bubbled together and muddy.

I'm telling you, it doesn't


Does too.


Not.


So.

I find my unemployment somewhat baffling. Just the other day some girl I know was saying that she'd had an interview with Argos for the temp work at Christmas, whereas I'd also applied and never heard a thing about it. Bunch of bastards. And she's functionally illiterate and innumerate, and obviously has never lasted long in any of her previous jobs. I certainly wouldn't hire her. I'd hire me, though. The application form wasn't even one of those with pages of idiot questions like "Why do you want to work for us" or "give an example of how you've succeeded in team work". That sort of bullshit. As you might expect I don't tend to hear back from jobs where I've filled in those.


Damn, that is baffling. You'd think they'd have recognized all your fine qualities right away, and handed you a Santa's elf costume, an apron, an ID card, and the keys to the register before such a catch could have a chance of escape.

I'd hire me


Now that would look fine on your resume. Good references can make a big difference, you know.

And so, on I go to the next pile, a dusty one, with lots of paperbacks purchased mostly for the dishy pulp illustrations on the covers...

Image

Murder Leaves a Ring, Fay Grissom Stanley
The Kraken Awakes, John Wyndham
The Man Who Tamed Lightning, Floyd Miller
Of Men and Numbers, Jane Muir
The Frightened Wife, Mary Roberts Rinehart
Democracy on the March, David E.l Lillienthal
Is Elvis Alive?, Gail Brewer-Giorgio
Checkpoint Lambda, Murray Leinster
The Etruscan, Mika Waltari
Tuned Out, Maia Wojeciechowska
Minds and Machines, W. Sluckin
A History of Japan, George Sanson
American Air Mail Catalogue
The Plastic Age, Robert Sklar
The Pursuit of Justice, Robert F. Kennedy
The Lord of the Flies, William Golding
Tosca (libretto), Puccini
Gems of Life, Alma White
Ten Droll Tales, Honore De Balzac
The Magic Universe, Mary Graham Bonner
The Art of Window Display, Lester Gaba
The Swiss Family Robinson in words of one syllable, I.F.M.
John Martin's Big Book for all Children
The Last Journals of David Livingstone, David Livingstone
Man into Woman, Niels Hoyer
The Paternak Manual for Bicycle Framebuilders, Tim Paternak
Up at the Villa, W. Somerset Maugham
Wine, Women and Murder, John Roeburt
Paint on their Faces, Jerry Weil
BUtterfield 8, John O'Hara
Boy-Lover, Alex Carter
Slaughter Street, Louis Falstein
The Burning Court, John Dickson Carr
The Ingoldsby Legends, Thomas Ingoldsby
Handbook of Package Engineering, Joseph F. Hanlon
Sincere's Bicycle Service Manual, William Ewers
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Sun Oct 17, 2010 7:56 am

barracuda wrote:I hasten to agree with you. I never was one for the laying of vegetables upon my eyelids, if a cucumber really is a vegetable at all, something I am most suspicious of in the first place. But a manicure mightn't hurt you, if you're really trimming your nails with hair-cutting scissors.


It's most unwise to use nail clippers upon one's nails, especially the toe-nails. It is the leading cause of in-grown nails.

I must say, I'm getting a far better impression of your library than of your habits concerning personal hygiene. I would strongly encourage you to bathe regularly and with soap, and to brush your sensitive incisors after each meal of boiled potatoes.


Heard and ignored.

Ah, a subscriber to the parallel dimension theory. Not me. I live quite near the northwestern Pacific rainforest, and I suppose it might be possible for a large mammal that had any good sense to avoid people quite easily, at least around here.


Not, however, around here.

Or around any of Britain's Canals.

They don't necessarily have to be other-dimensional. Could be time travellers, possible they come from within the hollow earth, could be tulpoid thought forms or archetypes brought into the sensory realm by the effects of the earth's magnetic field upon the human mind. Physical, certainly, but not entirely solid.

That's not too bad. I was going for a Stephen Fry sort of thing, but that's near enough.


Wasn't he the guy that played Oscar Wilde in some film version of the poor fellow's life?




You funny talking foreigners with your funny little ways.


And this whole time I'd been visualizing you as the foreigner. Just goes to show how wrong a guy can be.


Well I'm glad to correct you on this matter, I'm not at all foreign whatsoever.

I love to hear the way you Englanders talk. Can't quite get what you're up to most of the time, but it never fails to amaze me that you're actually speaking basically the same kind of words we do, by and large, even though they sort of come out all bubbled together and muddy.


Ruby Wax, who I believe to be American, was on QI the other day and had the temerity to ask "are you speaking English" of Ross Noble, who talks with a noticeable Geordie accent. He has very long hair as well, although unlike me he has the black hair.

I'm telling you, it doesn't


Does too.


Not.


So.


SO not.

Damn, that is baffling. You'd think they'd have recognized all your fine qualities right away, and handed you a Santa's elf costume, an apron, an ID card, and the keys to the register before such a catch could have a chance of escape.


You're the second person in a week to suggest that I wear a Santa suit, which is a bit odd.

I'd hire me


Now that would look fine on your resume. Good references can make a big difference, you know.


I've heard it but I don't believe it.

The Ingoldsby Legends, Thomas Ingoldsby


Overlap. Wasn't actually by a Thomas Ingoldsby, you know.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Sun Oct 17, 2010 4:35 pm

Stephen Morgan wrote:It's most unwise to use nail clippers upon one's nails, especially the toe-nails. It is the leading cause of in-grown nails.


Of course, that's why one should shell out the one-dollar and fifty cents for a pair of toenail clippers. Or, in your case, one-hundred and seventy-five dollars for an industrial disk grinder. Or what ever the comparable amount comes to when exchanged for "quids".

Heard and ignored.


The dreaded confirmation of my greatest fear.

Well I'm glad to correct you on this matter, I'm not at all foreign whatsoever.


We seem to have at least that in common.

I'm telling you, it doesn't


Does too.


Not.


So.


SO not.


So SO.

You're the second person in a week to suggest that I wear a Santa suit, which is a bit odd.


I didn't actually suggest you wear a Santa suit, rather that you might be gainfully employed as an elf-personator to the benefit of all concerned. I'm thinking, you know, green tights, leafy shaped overshirt and peaked hat, with some prosthetic pointed ears and a hammer.

Overlap. Wasn't actually by a Thomas Ingoldsby, you know.


My fine edition from 1866 (which is a reprint from the 10th English edition), cites Ingoldsby as the author, with a paranthetical acknowledgement that this is a DBA of The Rev. Richard Harris Barham.
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby Stephen Morgan » Mon Oct 18, 2010 6:20 am

barracuda wrote:
Overlap. Wasn't actually by a Thomas Ingoldsby, you know.


My fine edition from 1866 (which is a reprint from the 10th English edition), cites Ingoldsby as the author, with a paranthetical acknowledgement that this is a DBA of The Rev. Richard Harris Barham.


Ingoldsby was the fictional creation of Barham. My edition is from 1905, and according to what's written in the cover was presented as a prize for something, the handwriting making it impossible for me to say what, to a school boy in 1909. For some reason the cover is very padded and soft like a cushion.
Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible. -- Lawrence of Arabia
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:35 am

Just so you know, I'm not done here, but I need a breather from stirring up the dusty books. As the governor said, "I'll be back".
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Sun Oct 24, 2010 4:39 pm

This may be the last significant group in my list. There are others, but I'm too lazy to go any farther, honestly.

Image

Quotations from Chairman Mao Tsetung
The Web of Government, R.M. MacIver
American Government, edited by Peter H. Odegard
Insects - Their Ways and Means of Living, Robert Evans Snodgrass
The Story of Henri Tod, William F. Buckley
A Short History of the Movies, Gerald Mast
Nevada, Zane Grey
The Blue Flower, Henry Van Dyke
Suppressed Desires, Susan Glasnell
Common Sense in Chess, Emanuel Lasker
The Nutcracker, ETA Hoffmann
The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten
Slot Machines, The First 100 Years, Marshall Fey
1969 - The Year in Review, Time Life Books
The Two Towers, J. R. R. Tolkien
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask), Dr. David Reuben
The Origin of the Species, Charles Darwin
Tales of Power, Carlos Casteneda
Journey to Ixtlan, ibid
Dracula, Bram Stoker
Walden Two, B.F. Skinner
Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
Lord Jim, Joseph Conrad
The Sword in the Stone, T. H. White
Scott's Lady of the Lake
The Prince, Machiavelli
The Martian Chronicles, Ray Bradbury
Bend Sinister, Vladimir Nabokov
Pale Fire, ibid
Paradise Lost and Other Poems, john Milton
The Illiad, Homer
The Odyssey, ibid
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson
Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte
The Vicar of Wakefield, Oliver Goldsmith
The Only Dance There Is, Ram Dass
Bible
Mysteries of the Unexplained, edited by Carrol C. Calkins
Pocket Reference, third edition
Groundwater and Wells, Fletcher G. Driscoll
The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light, William Irwin Thompson
The History of the American Revolution With A Summary View Of The State And Character Of The British Colonies Of North America, John Lendrum, 1836 (This is the oldest book in my collection.)

If I run across more that I can easily reach in the course of my travels through the basement files, I will gladly post them. FIN
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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Postby Perelandra » Wed Oct 27, 2010 12:09 am

Thanks, I'm enjoying this.

". . . reading is not a substitute for life, because it is indivisible from life. Indeed, it is a reflection of the spirit of the reader, and I am truly convinced that we who are committed readers may appear to choose our books, but in an equally true sense our books choose us. By an agency that is not coincidence, but something much more powerful that Jungians call synchronicity, we find, and are found by, the books we need to enlarge and complete us. Reading is not escape, something done at random; it is directed unerringly toward the inner target. It is truly a turning inward. It is exploration, extension, and reflection of one’s innermost self. If I have been a rake at reading, the caprice has been to the outward eye alone. The inward spirit, I am convinced, knew very well what it was doing."

--Robertson Davies


“The past is never dead. It's not even past.” - William Faulkner
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Postby Perelandra » Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:49 pm

I just came across a signed copy of this on Craigslist and thought of you, b.

Image
“The past is never dead. It's not even past.” - William Faulkner
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Re: List your entire library here

Postby barracuda » Fri Oct 29, 2010 5:01 pm

Mmm, Dali's cookbook, containing such delicacies as "Sputniks Polished by Statistical Maggots", illustrated below.

Image

Tasty!
The most dangerous traps are the ones you set for yourself. - Phillip Marlowe
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