Fruit tree how-to's

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Fruit tree how-to's

Postby chiggerbit » Tue Nov 20, 2007 2:26 pm

This thread is for tips on growing fruit trees, shrubs, vines, as well as harvesting fruit, storing fruit, etc.



It's easy to make a number of mistakes in choosing which tree to plant, but it isn't that hard, either, to pick the right ones if a few tips are kept in mind. For anyone thinking about planting fruit trees, but not experienced, I would say off the top of my head, before choosing what kind of tree to plant, consider"

Your climate (as well as possible future changes to your climate)

Your soil

Moisture content in the soil, as wll as how well you soil holds moisture

Purpose the fruit will be used for. (For instance, some apples are good for dessert, some for vinegar, some for cider, etc.)

Space requirements

Your desired timeline to bearing age

Diseases common in your area for that kind of fruit tree

Pollination needs

Storage needs and restrictions


Feel free to jump in here. Meanwhile, I'll add to this when I have more time.
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Postby chiggerbit » Thu May 07, 2009 1:16 pm

Rats! I planted an Arkansas Black apple tree about ten years ago, and it has been slow to mature. I chose it because it's apples are great to store. As a matter of fact, for the first couple of months after picking, they are so hard they almost break your teeth, but as winter progresses, they "soften" up a little. If you want to try growing apples, this is one of the things you need to consider in choosing which tree to plant--storage. If you aren't going to eat the apples as they come off the tree, what is your plan for storage? Will you can them? Make applesausce and can it, or vinegar or juice ? Some are better for applesauce, or juice, or vinegar than others. Will you freeze them? Or choose kinds that store well? Some kinds are only good for six to eight weeks in storage.

Anyway, my problem is that most apple trees produce heavy crops on alternate years, and very light to almost no crops on the opposite years. Well, the Arkansas one is finally in it's first heavy bloom this year, and now I see that this isn't the heavy-blooimg year for the other late bloomer that I had planted, the one I intended to pollinize the Arkansas Black. ERRRK!

I wonder how many more apple trees I'm going to have to plant and wait for to find one that pollinates the right year.
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Postby chiggerbit » Thu May 07, 2009 1:24 pm

Hmmmm, I may try budding (an easy, tiny method of grafting) from the other tree onto a twig of the Arkansas tree next year, and then again the next year, see if I can get the clock to change on the other tree's bud.
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Postby chiggerbit » Thu May 07, 2009 1:27 pm

I should add that there are many varieties of apple trees nowadays that start bearing waaaay younger than do the Arkansas Black.
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