Disney's Runaway Brain

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Postby Joe Hillshoist » Sat Jan 03, 2009 9:41 pm

OK. But what will Disney's products not have in them. We always talk about what's there but hidden, but I've been thinking that it ought to be equally important to eliminate any content that would have an adverse effect on the psyops intent or distribution of it's products.


Would you need to eliminate it or just frame it in such a way that its effect was minimalised? To me that would be a subtler and more effective use of the whole process.

BTW What about music

yvan et nioj (Is that a gig or a stripshow?)
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Postby brainpanhandler » Sat Jan 03, 2009 11:04 pm

BTW What about music


It's funny you ask. I bought the Time/Life 70's Music Explosion collection for my sister for christmas. I made copies. This was the soundtrack to my childhood. When I was a kid I had to listen to the radio to get to sleep. This stuff was piped directly into my brain.

Image

Devil Woman

Speaking of soundtracks. If you close your eyes and listen to the soundtrack of Runaway Brain during the underground lab scenes and the fight scenes they sound a lot like a world war II naval battle.
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More 1995 movie violence against women, Grossman

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Sun Jan 04, 2009 4:38 am

For context of that op Disney short, more 1995 movie violence against women, Grossman's 'On Killing' expose of conditioning children-

http://xml.newsday.com/topic/cl-movie960406-69,0,3627030.story

From the Los Angeles Times
MOVIE REVIEW

Copycat
The Dark Big Picture 'Copycat' Is a Troubling Reflection of Cinema

By KENNETH TURAN | TIMES FILM CRITIC
.....

Friday October 27, 1995
.....
...America seems to have gone serial killer mad. "Seven," a grotesque examination of a perverse criminal mind, was No. 1 at the nation's box office for four weeks running, and now, joining in the plague, comes "Copycat," which features not one but two serial killers for devotees to choose from.
Though "Copycat" is not as across-the-board repulsive as "Seven," this is not for lack of trying, as director Jon Amiel and writers Ann Biderman and David Madsen have loaded the film with terrorized women and graphic close-ups of tortured female corpses.
But, by having Sigourney Weaver and Holly Hunter play the maniacs' feisty antagonists, the filmmakers seem to believe that they've made a significant feminist statement, the movie's two hours-plus of almost continual sadistic abuse of women notwithstanding. Even in an industry known for self-delusion, that is quite a feat.
.....
And isn't it also possible that these films are making viewers unrealistically fearful for their personal safety and thus having a pernicious influence on public policy? And isn't it becoming increasingly true, to quote Lt. Col. David Grossman's "On Killing," a recent study on how soldiers act in battle, that "we are reaching that stage of desensitization at which the inflicting of pain and suffering has become a source of entertainment: vicarious pleasure rather than revulsion. We are learning to kill, and we are learning to like it."
CIA runs mainstream media since WWII:
news rooms, movies/TV, publishing
...
Disney is CIA for kidz!
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Postby brainpanhandler » Sun Jan 04, 2009 12:43 pm

KENNETH TURAN | TIMES FILM CRITIC wrote:...A bigger, probably unanswerable question, is why audiences embrace this kind of material with such avidity. Are we so jaded, our lives so overloaded with sensation, that we need something as excessive as "Copycat" or "Seven" to arouse our interest? Why is getting a rise out of audiences by any means necessary something to boast about? And when did watching people being graphically tortured become America's favorite form of theatrical entertainment?
And isn't it also possible that these films are making viewers unrealistically fearful for their personal safety and thus having a pernicious influence on public policy? And isn't it becoming increasingly true, to quote Lt. Col. David Grossman's "On Killing," a recent study on how soldiers act in battle, that "we are reaching that stage of desensitization at which the inflicting of pain and suffering has become a source of entertainment: vicarious pleasure rather than revulsion. We are learning to kill, and we are learning to like it."
Though pornography has always been a difficult concept to define satisfactorily, one way it has been traditionally looked at is as a one-step-beyond phenomenon, showing us things either sexual or violent that go one step beyond what society normally tolerates. In that context, "Copycat" seems pornographically intent on pushing the envelope of what is acceptable for thrillers on screen. If the trend continues it is not at all pleasant to contemplate where everything will end.


I'm familiar with this process of escalation, although in a different context. Suffice it to say I broke things off once they became too bizarre. It's a neurotic symptom and now it's a signpost of our collective degeneracy and psychopathology. 'Art' and life in a dialectical downward spiral of moral decadence.

Literal snuff films are still illegal, but virtual snuff films can have a similar effect. Never the same effect as there is nothing to surpass the tittilation factor of the disclaimer before a film that the events depicted are based on a true story except a literal documentary snuff/rape/violent crime film. The latter is no longer fantasy and elicits such overpowering reactions of revulsion and horror that most people would be unwilling to watch. I never wanna see such images myself except in the context of facing the reality of the extent of man's inhumanity to man, such as in a war documentary and even then I don't need to see them often, just often enough to remember as it is so easy to forget. (As an aside, The Exorcist is every bit as scary today as it was when it was released)

All the by now cliches about confronting the horror at the heart of our darkness apply. Look in the mirror to understand what you are so afraid of, etc...

It takes more and more graphic depictions of depravity to prime the adrenaline pump and it's of course no mistake that psychosexual brain circuits are coexcited in the process.

Turan is correct I think, but I don't care to debate the first amendment. The same with Grossman, if I understand his basic thesis without having actually read On Killing.

So to sum up your position...

Along with the SOP USG/Disney psyops fair there is also a second layer of psyops which serves to frame Grossman's theories of desensitization to violence via repeated media exposure as an entertainingly distorted sci-fi horror fantasy ( a cartoon no less) and completely unconnected with any reality.

Maybe so Hugh, maybe so.

I'm still wondering about your thoughts on the idea that the psyops engineers have to have a rule somewhat analogous to the hippocratic oath, first, do no harm. That is, do no harm to their own purposes. It seems to me that if the psyops engineers have their craft down to a frighteningly effective science and can control a Disney product in detail while simultaneously juggling the more capitalistic, mundane task of entertainment as well as more than one layer of cleverly designed psyops then it stands to reason that they would take care to omit anything which would undermine their efforts.

If an aspect of a Disney/USG psyops product serves to turn away the target audience then it seems to me it would be removed. There is no more basic function of psyops than to be consumed by the target audience. Absent that, there is no effect or the effect is greatly diluted.

I'm quite certain that I could join one of the right wing, fundamentalist christian websites, post about the satanic messages embedded in Runaway Brain and gather adherents. Adherents that would then be predisposed to shield their children from the satanic influences of Disney media if they weren't already. Why then would there be anything in a USG/Disney psyop product that could be construed as satanic? Aren't these people sophisticated enough to understand how that would be counter to their goals?

Runaway Brain probably cost millions of dollars to produce even though it is only a little over 7 minutes long. I imagine however that relative to a large scale production Runaway Brain was considered a little side, pet project. A throwback to the glory days of disney shorts. Looking through the year released index on this site it appears to me that for many of the last 50 years Disney produced only one short per year. Perhaps for the sole purpose of keeping the tradition alive and having an entry for animated short awards categories. As such I imagine the animators and producers are given some artistic license.

Trivia from IMDb:

The character name 'Dr. Frankenollie', besides the obvious Frankenstein reference, is also a reference to legendary Disney animators Frank Thomas (I) and Oliver M. Johnston Jr..


The tune that Mickey Mouse whistles is the song that he whistled from Steamboat Willie (1928).


The items in Mickey's wallet are as follows: - 1 Picture from Steamboat Willie (1928);. - 2 Library card from the Guillard County Library (#2495 21095); - 3 Social Security card (#746-55-2769); 4)-Stamp, ticket stub and coin; 5)-Picture of Mickey and Minnie.


Zazu, the hornbill from The Lion King (1994) appears briefly on two occasions, going by too fast to be seen at regular speed. First he's part of the debris being sucked down the trap door, then he is spit out of the monster's mouth as it growls at Mickey.


This short film was released in North American movie theatres with _A Kid in King Arthur's Court (1995)_ and with A Goofy Movie (1995) internationally. It was later re-released in North American theatres in front of George of the Jungle (1997).


Dr. Frankenollie's laboratory is located at 1313 Lobotomy Lane. Disneyland's street address is 1313 Harbor Boulevard, Anaheim, California.


I can't help but imagine that it is generally known among Disney employees that conspiracy theories exist wrt their products, whether those theories be satanic messages or USG psyops. Given the obvious penchant the producers of Runaway Brain had for embedding obscure references in the film isn't it plausible to think that they are intentionally spoofing psyops and satanic messages theories and making fun of runaway brains? Just a thought.

I want to follow up eventually on the seeming liability of satanic messages conspiracy theories to USG psyops via Disney media. Probably the subject of another thread. One preliminary thought is that the target audience of USG recruitment psyops has changed. I'm not really sure that southern bible belt family values christians were ever really a prime target anyway. The recession/depression is going to create a lot of potential recruits. What demographic/subculture will they come from?

That's quite as much as I want to write on Runaway Brain. I'm gonna ask one of the mods to move the thread to the Psyops and Meme management forum.
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Postby Nordic » Mon Jan 05, 2009 3:54 am

Not to be too off topic, but has anyone else seen that commercial they're showing these days before movies?

Here in LA, at least, while showing trailers, they show a "music video" commercial for the National Guard. It's just brazen propaganda, for recruitment.

Then at the end, they show the CD that the song is on, and how you can buy it (!!)

It's really repulsive.

And what's really bad is that the National Guard used to be for helping out at home, you know, after natural disasters and the like. Now you join the National Guard to be a "warrior".

It's some seriously fucked up shit.

Anybody else see that in their markets, or is this just an LA thing?
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Postby LilyPatToo » Mon Jan 05, 2009 7:47 pm

I've been seeing it here in NorCal, in the Oakland theaters that are owned by Regal Cinemas. And I'm really, REALLY offended at it in general, but especially because half of the audience is inner-city youth and their parents. It makes me *furious*!

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Postby brainpanhandler » Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:40 pm

Nordic wrote:Not to be too off topic, but has anyone else seen that commercial they're showing these days before movies?

Here in LA, at least, while showing trailers, they show a "music video" commercial for the National Guard. It's just brazen propaganda, for recruitment.

Then at the end, they show the CD that the song is on, and how you can buy it (!!)

It's really repulsive.

And what's really bad is that the National Guard used to be for helping out at home, you know, after natural disasters and the like. Now you join the National Guard to be a "warrior".

It's some seriously fucked up shit.

Anybody else see that in their markets, or is this just an LA thing?


I've not seen that here, but that is not surprising. This area is probably not a hotbed for military recruitment.

I imagine the recruiters are fairly desperate. We're liable to see some pretty innovative techniques.
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Postby brainpanhandler » Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:41 pm

LilyPatToo wrote:I've been seeing it here in NorCal, in the Oakland theaters that are owned by Regal Cinemas. And I'm really, REALLY offended at it in general, but especially because half of the audience is inner-city youth and their parents. It makes me *furious*!

LilyPat


I share your feelings.
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