Color as subliminal messaging, 1962 Color Marketing Group

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Re: "Synesthesia and Fuzzy Functions'

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Thu Oct 05, 2006 1:45 pm

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>back to the subject of millitary garb in fashion, what are your thoughts on the fact that keffiyeh scarves are currently in fashion here in the UK amongst young people who probably are more or less clueless about the situation in the middle east?<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Interesting. I wonder if there is a generalized anti-war sentiment being focused on Israel due to Blair's tagging along with Bush for 5 years and the recent bombing of Lebanon. People do act out their hunches and emotions with specific acts that are subconsciously processed.<br><br>And frequently they are given props to do it with that satisfy their emotions without looking beyond their need to express themselves. Example: Americans have been sold bumper stickers that say "Support Our Troops" which is meaningless but satisfies some emotional need to connect to the War on Terra.<br><br>Marketers call this use of trinkets the "first commitment" tactic to sell bigger things later. Sympathy for our young troops in "harm's way" is being slippery-sloped towards the war itself.<br><br>Principle of psychological warfare's Divide and Conquer tactic-<br>" People need visible targets for their frustrations."<br>And emotions are transferable just as American's 9/11 anger towards Afghanistan was carefully transferred to Iraq.<br><br>The study of color psychology stepped up after WWII and is part of marketing savvy and thus part of governance, too. Business and government have been sharing their research on influencing the masses for the last 100 years. (That's what scientific fascism is.)<br><br>The study of how our senses interact like a kind of internal biological cross-marketing called <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>'Synesthesia'</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> goes back atleast to the 1970s and you can imagine how exploitable is the attendent concept of <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>'Fuzzy Functions.'</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>I think this is what is behind making the Hollywood villain blue in the 2002 Frankie Munzie film 'Big Fat Liar' to get kids subconsciously hostile to 'blue Democrats,' fuzzy thinking. (No, not mine, Professor Pan, the kids! Beat ya to it, lol.)<br><br>Consider how synesthesia is used in movies like 'The Exorcist' in 1973 which used unsettling sounds like bees swarming and pigs being slaughtered allied with scary images. Someone wrote me that a CIA advisor was in on the making of that movie and its effect on viewers much like Hadley Cantril's study of the 1938 War of the World panic. I don't have back-up for that but it is interesting that this sensory synthesis was in a 1976 book called 'The Structure of Magic Volume II.' Right time period and the social unrest amongst youth coined 'the sixties' spurred efforts to reign in those energies with entertainment diversions and cults.<br><br>Maybe even Disco was an MK-ULTRA project to bury Woodstock generation cultural cues. I'm only half-joking because FM radio was used to take the peace and justice messages out of the anti-war movement and reduce it to mere love songs and spectacle. Read Alex Constantine's 'The Covert War Against Rock' to learn how the CIA's Operation CHAOS took apart the Woodstock Generation by targeting its icons COINTELPRO-style. Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, all dead shortly after Kent State caused campuses to explode with anger. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Keeping white middle-class students and black Americans from uniting around music like the blues was probably the motive. </strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>Ah, there's some more meaning around the color 'blue.'<br><br>Now we have very distinct black and white music kept on seperate channels and even exaggerated into The Nashville Network vs Gangsta Rap. This has social implications. Color, music, politics...Synesthesia. Divide and Conquer.<br><br>many links here-<br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.doctorhugo.org/synaesthesia/">www.doctorhugo.org/synaesthesia/</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br>(Belgian Synesthesia Association)<br><br>including this one-<br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.doctorhugo.org/synaesthesia/fuzzyfunctions.html">www.doctorhugo.org/synaes...tions.html</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><!--EZCODE IMAGE START--><img src="http://www.doctorhugo.org/synaesthesia/fuzzyfunctions.gif" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END--><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Synesthesia and Fuzzy Functions<br><br>Synaesthesia: synesthesia links have to do with the mutual influence between sensory representations. Certain qualities of feelings may be linked to certain qualities of imagery - for example, the intensity of a feeling may be linked to the brightness of an image; the color of an image (red or blue, for instance) may influence the temperature of a feeling; people may feel the impact of a particular image at different locations in their bodies depending on its quality of movement; and so on. Synesthesia is at the basis of our appreciation of art. They are also the basis of the so-called "fuzzy functions".<br><br>Fuzzy Functions: "Fuzzy Functions" were defined by John Grinder and Richard Bandler in The Structure of Magic Volume II (1976) as a connecting or overlapping of our sensory representational systems. Technically, Grinder and Bandler define "fuzzy functions" as:<br>* Any modeling involving a representational system and either an input channel or an output channel in which the input or output channel involved is a different modality from the representational system with which it is being used. In traditional psychophysics, this term, 'fuzzy function', is most closely translated by the term 'synesthesia'.<br><br>Hearing a loud noise (auditory input channel) and feeling startled or frightened (kinesthetic representational system), for example, is a "fuzzy function" because the sound has overlapped onto physical and emotional sensations. Seeing internal imagery while listening to music, or having emotional responses to seeing various facial expressions would also be a results of "fuzzy functions." Fuzzy functions are typically characterized by terms such as "see-feel" or "hear-feel" circuits. According to Grinder and Bandler, fuzzy functions are the way in which our experience acquires meaning, but can also be the source of confusion and stress. Fuzzy functions create problems when they lead to stuck states and when we have no choice about them. Problematic fuzzy functions can be dealt with by sorting and separating the representational channels that have become fused or confused. This can be accomplished a variety of ways. Accessing Cues and Submodality interventions can be used to help people clarify and influence different aspects of their sensory experience.<br><br>—Source: Robert Dilts, Santa Cruz, CA. Edited by Dr. Hugo Heyrman, Antwerp, BE.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=hughmanateewins>Hugh Manatee Wins</A> at: 10/5/06 11:51 am<br></i>
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hmm

Postby orz » Thu Oct 05, 2006 3:04 pm

Interesting stuff....<br><br>not sure about this tho:<br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Now we have very distinct black and white music kept on seperate channels and even exaggerated into The Nashville Network vs Gangsta Rap.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END-->I would say the opposite... pop music is becoming so homogenised... most kids listen to mainstream rap, white boy indie rock, dance etc all mixed up with no real differentation between genres these days<br><br>Certainly there are seperate channels etc but the real mainstream of pop is totally mixed up (in every sense of the word) these days! Here in the UK at least, I can't speak for elsewhere... or really here these days, i feel old and out of touch haha! <p></p><i></i>
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Re: hmm

Postby professorpan » Thu Oct 05, 2006 11:35 pm

Hip hop has pretty much eclipsed all other music among kids -- white, black, Asian, Latino, they all listen to rap.<br><br>Hugh, I love you, pal, but you need to get up out of the armchair and do so some real-world anthropological research. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: getting out of the armchair

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Fri Oct 06, 2006 2:35 am

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr> Hip hop has pretty much eclipsed all other music among kids -- white, black, Asian, Latino, they all listen to rap.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>True. MTV has kind of slurred it all into the same genre.<br><br>But amongst adults, the lines are drawn much harder.<br>There is a schizm between young and old and black and white, too.<br><br>I do lots of real world anthropological research, PP, since I'm in an unusual profession where I get to see every demographic and I've seen what powerful emotional triggers are cultural artifacts that don't seem 'political' at all. (But if you've got free tickets, I'll accept the invitation. lol.)<br><br>I've heard many people get disgusted when talking about the 'other camp' of either rednecks or rappers. Very strong triggers for many because racism, racism's hangover, and stress over media stereotypes is still very common in the US.<br><br>I've heard white people who blame the left-behinds in New Orleans for their plight and scorn those black "looters." Ugly stuff fed partly by the media's COINTELPRO blame-the-victims coverage of Katrina and partly by years of predisposing people to see each other this way. Same thing with black people's hostility to 'white privilage' and 'crackers.' This stuff is being stoked by media. <br><br>After all, FM radio still plays Lynyrd Skynyrd's song 'Sweet Home Alabama' which is a tribute to arch-segregationist Gov. George Wallace. And I've already gone into Disney and Pirates of the Caribbean with the black cannibal villains.<br><br>Right in our faces. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: getting out of the armchair

Postby Joe Hillshoist » Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:04 am

Hugh sometimes yoiu make brilliant arguments that then go completely askew. BFD<br><br>I know that one of the reasons camo is fasionable is that in the 80s, cool people brought clothes from army surplus stores cos those were clothes were cheap and tough, and stood up to the rigours of skating, going to gigs and slam dancing (not moshing slam dancing), the first time I went I was 15 at an underground club. I woke up and had to fly back form a holiday, on the plane I realised I had blood on my shirt, but it was an army shirt so it washed off.<br><br>Fuck, couldn't do that these days. I digress.<br><br>but you get the idea.<br><br>I still have a vietnam era Tiger stripe camo shirt I wear when I am patching. Still got me mates dads name and number on it. I have had that shirt for over 20 years, and its copped some abuse, might have even been the one I was wearing that night of slamming.<br><br>On that level I think your idea about where cam and fatiigue fashion came from was complete crap. Cos it came from people like me buying those clothes for 50c at the disposals store and being cool cos we liked the happening music. And were cool or not cos we didn't give a fuck.<br><br>But then that desert and urban camo appeared in huge numbers, right after Gulf War 1. And most of it was off the rack store bought shit, not actual military issue disposal gear.<br><br>That fits your theory well IMO.<br><br>Especially as it was about the time a raised fist and the chant USA USA USA became the underlying meme behind the expression of american culture.<br><br>but to anyone that says colours contain no info. Ever hear of the Tattwa?<br><br>And:<br><br>Apparantly its an established fact that competitive sportspeople who wear red succeed more than those that don't.<br><br>They are all bold as love them colours. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: The Tattwa

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Sat Oct 07, 2006 1:18 am

Interesting, Joe. Thanks for mentioning the tattwa. Coming back to it. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: back to color as politics. Colonel Landsdale>election

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Sat Oct 07, 2006 1:46 am

The swashbuckling CIA Cold warrior Colonel Edward Landale is credited by ex-CIA Victor Marchetti with winning a Vietnam election using color on the ballots.<br><br>From 'The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence, by Victor Marchettin and John D. Marks, p. 28-<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>His (Lansdale's) activites, extensively described in the Pentagon Papers, extended to pacification programs, military training, even political consultation: Lansdale helped design the ballots when Diem formally ran for President of South Vietnam in 1955. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>He used red, the Asian good-luck color, for Diem and green- signifying a cuckold- for Diem's opponent.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> Diem won with an embarassingly high 98 percent of the vote, and Lansdale was widely credited within American government circles for having carried out another successful operation. He left Vietnam soon afterward.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>This is the same Colonel Edward Lansdale identified by L. Fletcher Prouty in photos taken at Dealey Plaza in Dallas on 11/22/63. Lansdale was that important to CIA operations.<br><!--EZCODE IMAGE START--><img src="http://www.jfkresearch.com/eaglesham/page6.jpg" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: back to color as politics. War of the Worlds

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:07 am

The Red Weed is a plant that grows on Mars in the H. G. Wells sci-fi story which panicked Americans during the famous 1938 Princeton Radio Project experiment.<br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_weed">en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_weed</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The red weed (also referred to as the red creeper) is a fictional plant native to Mars in the novel The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. It is this plant that supposedly gives Mars its dull red colour. It is brought to Earth possibly accidentally by the invading Martians. When it is exposed to water, it grows and reproduces explosively, flooding the neighbouring countryside as it clogs streams and rivers. The narrator mentions near the end of "The Man on Putney Hill" that the weed glows purple at night.<br><br>Though it engulfed the native plant life of Earth it succumbed to the effects of Earth bacteria.<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>As the book has been interpreted as criticism of British Imperialism, the Red Weed can be seen as a metaphor for territorial expansion (the British Empire being traditionally coloured pink or red on maps).</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Hmm. Imperialism, not Communism.<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>In other adaptations<br><br>The red weed is not mentioned at all in the radio adaptation, and is absent from the 1953 film; however its absence fits in with the retcon established for the TV series follow-up in which the aliens originate from Mor-Tax, a garden planet. Therefore, their means of transforming the planet was actually to conserve and promote Earth's own vegetation.<br><br>In <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Steven Spielberg's</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> War of the Worlds the presence of the red weed on Earth is clearly intentional. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Once they have a strong hold of the planet, the invaders take captured humans and then drain their blood, which somehow acts as a fertiliser for the red weed, helping it grow and cover the planet. </strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->Though it is never stated that these invaders come from Mars, the script indicates that the weed is abundantly present on their world as well, suggesting the two share a superficial resemblance. However, what exactly makes up their red weed, whether it is a natural vegetation or what gives it its colour on their world, is unknown. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>It is also stated in the script that the weed is fierce enough to flourish in spite of the conditions that forced the aliens to find refuge on a new world.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> But despite its tenacity to survive such a harsh environment, much like in the novel, the red weed is killed by Earth's bacteria.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Spielberg is in my Suspects folder since all his movies are loaded with mind viruses. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Color as subliminal messaging, 1962 Color Marketing Grou

Postby terryintacoma » Mon Oct 09, 2006 7:25 am

"Have you wondered why so many clothing merchants offer military camouflage-colored clothes for children lately?"<br><br>Mr. Humanity, you had me from the start, and don't think I wasn't surprised to see my nephew's four boys (ages 4-10) marching back and forth in their camouflaged fatigues the last time they were here visiting with their great-grandmother about a month ago.<br><br>Doubly surprised because these kids are fed a heavy diet of religious zeal. Lots of bible studies, no violent tv, no guns were ever allowed in their play. And now they dress them like that? (gulp)<br><br>And<br><br>Thank you for the latest "2006 Consumer Color Directions".<br><br>Oh soooo creepy.<br><br>"Techno-Organic Balance" indeed.<br><br>"Heritage with Heart." (Hear's Twilight Show music in the background.) "We can change the focus to a soft blur..."<br><br><br>I recently purchased a book from Amazon (one I use to own and lost) called "Gem Therapy" by Dr. Benoytosh Bhattacharyya. An interesting study in color and healing.<br><br>"Well, break out the Crayolas and color me tickled pink."<br> <br>Terry ^^<br><br><br> <br><br><br> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=terryintacoma>terryintacoma</A> at: 10/9/06 5:27 am<br></i>
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Re: back to color as politics. War of the Worlds

Postby Joe Hillshoist » Mon Oct 09, 2006 9:15 am

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The red weed (also referred to as the red creeper)<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Of course the red weed would not have been a handy metaphor in 1938....<br><br>For dupont or Aslinger.<br><br>Never. <p></p><i></i>
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red

Postby orz » Mon Oct 09, 2006 4:02 pm

Hugh, you do realise when 'war of the worlds' was written, right...?<br><br>but yah... red is a good metaphor for all sorts of stuff at any period in history...<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Spielberg is in my Suspects folder since all his movies are loaded with mind viruses.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>I just wanted to see that again! ^_^ <br><br>(not to mock, i really do like that sentence! And tho we don't see eye to eye i can't really argue that it's not true at some level!) <p></p><i></i>
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Re: back to color as politics. War of the Worlds

Postby professorpan » Mon Oct 09, 2006 4:03 pm

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Spielberg is in my Suspects folder since all his movies are loaded with mind viruses.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Any quality film is loaded with mind viruses -- otherwise known as "ideas." <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Prof Pan's comment

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Mon Oct 09, 2006 4:30 pm

Any quality film is loaded with mind viruses -- <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>otherwise known as "ideas."</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br><!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :lol --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/laugh.gif ALT=":lol"><!--EZCODE EMOTICON END--> <br><br>Have you watched the Spielberg-directed Tom Hanks/Catherine Zeta-Jones 'romantic comedy' called 'The Terminal?'<br><br>More social engineering and statist propaganda than you can shake a mouse at. But I will eventually because it is just thick with them. "Ideas." That's funny.<br><br>Yah, Leni Reifenstahl's 'Triumph of the Will' has "ideas."<br> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=hughmanateewins>Hugh Manatee Wins</A> at: 10/9/06 2:36 pm<br></i>
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hmm

Postby orz » Mon Oct 09, 2006 4:47 pm

I have to say that i couldn't believe the trailer for that film (haven't seen the movie, may do one day for educational purposes..) ...I find it so weird and frightening when in US cinema/tv a forigner is portrayed as being almost not even human, kind of weird child-man or extraterrestrial... who can't understand everyday objects or US habits... WITH HILLARIOUS CONCEQUENCES! <!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :rolleyes --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/eyes.gif ALT=":rolleyes"><!--EZCODE EMOTICON END--> <!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :rolleyes --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/eyes.gif ALT=":rolleyes"><!--EZCODE EMOTICON END--> <!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :rolleyes --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/eyes.gif ALT=":rolleyes"><!--EZCODE EMOTICON END--> Aside from any sinister subliminal content, it's pretty sickening. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: orz comment on 'The Terminal' trailer

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Mon Oct 09, 2006 5:29 pm

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>.I find it so weird and frightening when in US cinema/tv a forigner is portrayed as being almost not even human, kind of weird child-man or extraterrestrial.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Tom Hanks portraying a rural Central Asian man as a kind of naive Forrest Gump reprise, the gullible innocent who rises to maturity by dealing with the complexities of the Emerald City on a Hill, America!<br><br>And caught in an American Homeland Security airport beaurocracy made to look like a Disney ride with funny surveillance-camera hijinks instead of the reality that he would be a likely candidate for 'extraordinary rendition' disappearence to Donald and Mickey's Torture World.<br><br>This doesn't even begin to expose the mind viruses about gender, nationality, unions, racism, drugs, etc. in this Spielberg film from 2004.<br><br>Look at the 'news' when this movie was peddled and see the screaming lies designed to friendly-up horror and couched as comedy.<br><br>Tom Hanks, recently inducted into the Army Rangers Hall of Fame. I'm not kidding.<br><br>"Ideas." Ugh. <p></p><i></i>
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