Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

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Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby seemslikeadream » Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:25 am

Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire after drone attacks
7 minutes ago
Updated

Video: Drone attack in Saudi Arabia causes fire at an Aramco factory in Abqaiq (ABC News)
Yemen's Iran-aligned Houthi group have attacked and set fire to two oil plants central to Saudi Arabia's oil production, including the world's biggest petroleum processing facility.

Key points:

Drones have attacked Saudi Arabia's biggest oil facilities, causing huge fires
It is not clear if there were any injuries in the attacks or if oil production will be impacted
Yemen's Iran-backed Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for the attacks
Saudi Arabia said it had brought the blazes under control, but three sources close to the matter said oil production and exports had been disrupted from the Saudi Aramco facilities.

Yemen's Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for the attack on the Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq and the second drone strike on Khurais — the country's second largest oil field.

The group's military spokesman said the attacks were carried out by 10 drones and promised to continue its attacks on Saudi Arabia.

"These attacks are our right, and we warn the Saudis that our targets will keep expanding," spokesman Yahya Saree said in a statement read out on the rebels' Al Masirah TV.

"We have the right to strike back in retaliation to the air strikes and the targeting of our civilians for the last five years."

Half of Saudi Arabia's oil exports potentially affected

Looking across a Saudi Arabian desert field, you electric cable towers as the horizon is blanketed by dark grey smoke. Photo: Smoke billowed across the horizon following the drone strike in Abqaiq. (Reuters)
The drone strikes on the world's biggest oil exporter come as Saudi Aramco accelerates plans for an initial public offering of the state oil giant to as early as this year, and follow earlier cross-border attacks on Saudi oil installations and on oil tankers in Gulf waters.

The attacks appeared to be the most brazen yet.

Online videos apparently shot in Buqyaq, which is some 330 kilometres north-east of the capital Riyadh, included the sound of gunfire in the background and flames shooting out of the Abqaiq oil processing facility.

Smoke rose over the skyline and glowing flames could be seen a distance away.

Australia's secret arms deals

Australia's secret arms deals

The Australian Government has approved the export of dozens of shipments of military items to Middle Eastern countries embroiled in the bloody Yemen war.
Authorities have not reported on casualties. A Reuters witness nearby said at least 15 ambulances were seen in the area and there was a heavy security presence around Abqaiq.

The oil processing plant handles crude from the world's largest conventional oilfield, the supergiant Ghawar, and for export to terminals Ras Tanura — the world's biggest offshore oil loading facility — and Juaymah.

One source said 5 million barrels per day of crude production had been impacted — close to half the kingdom's output — but did not elaborate.

State television said exports were continuing but Aramco has yet to comment since the pre-dawn attack and authorities have not said whether oil production or exports were affected.

Who are the Houthi rebels?

Several people inspect huge amounts of rubble at the destroyed prison complex Photo: At least 100 people were killed at a Houthi detention centre by Saudi-led airstrikes in early September. (AP: Hani Mohammed)
The Houthi rebels have been battling a Saudi-led coalition of regional countries since 2015, when the coalition intervened in Yemen in support of President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, who had been forced out of power by the Houthis.

Saudi Arabia, leading a Sunni Muslim military coalition that intervened in Yemen in 2015 against the Houthis, has blamed Iran for previous attacks, which Tehran denies.

The Iran-backed rebels hold Yemen's capital, Sanaa, and other territory in the Arab world's poorest country.

Riyadh accuses Iran of arming the Houthis, a charge denied by the group and Tehran.

Who's who in the Yemen conflict

Who's who in the Yemen conflict
Yemen has been in the grip of an increasingly complex civil war since 2011, as several competing factions fight for control of the Middle East's poorest country.
The war has become one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis.

The violence has pushed Yemen to the brink of famine and killed more than 90,000 people since 2015, according to the US-based Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project, which tracks the conflict.

The coalition launches air strikes almost every day, while the Houthis often fire missiles into Saudi Arabia.

Since the start of the Saudi-led war, Houthi rebels have been using drones in combat.

The first appeared to be off-the-shelf, hobby-kit-style drones, but later, versions nearly identical to Iranian models turned up. Iran denies supplying the Houthis with weapons.

The Houthis launched drone attacks targeting Saudi Arabia's crucial East-West Pipeline in May as tensions heightened between Iran and the US.

A man carries a young girl through rubble after an air strike in Yemen. Photo: A man carries a child rescued from the site of a Saudi-led air strike that killed eight of her family members in Sanaa, Yemen in 2017. (Reuters: Khaled Abdullah)
UN investigators said the Houthis' new UAV-X drone, found in recent months during the Saudi-led coalition's war in Yemen, likely has a range of up to 1,500 kilometres.

That puts the far reaches of both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in range.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-14/ ... s/11513728
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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby Grizzly » Sat Sep 14, 2019 2:58 pm

Better go fill the tank up, this weekend. Thanks Bush...

Hurry! Blame Iran!

Oops, Done: Daily smell

Iran-backed militants admit drone swarm strike on world's largest oil processing plant in Saudi and at second nearby facility sparking huge fires as tensions reach boiling point following tanker attacks https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7463189/Drone-attacks-spark-huge-fires-two-Saudi-oil-refineries.html
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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby seemslikeadream » Sat Sep 14, 2019 7:12 pm

Pompeo accuses Iran of 'unprecedented attack' after drones hit Saudi oil facilities
https://www.foxnews.com/politics/pompeo ... -saudi-oil
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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby Elvis » Mon Sep 16, 2019 9:07 pm

How did the world's fourth largest military fail to detect and intercept at least a portion of these attacks on its own critical oil facilities?

It seems like the geography of Saudi Arabia doesn't really lend itself to sneak attacks.

A discussion on NPR just concluded, We're not saying Iran was involved, since we just don't know whether or not Iran was involved. But yeah, Iran was involved.

Apparently the size and precision of the attacks are likely beyond known Houthi technical capabilities, Iranian aid notwithstanding. Who else would have both motive and means to knock out so much oil production? (No one on NPR thought to ask.)

Oil price up "only 14%" — who benefits here?
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby Iamwhomiam » Mon Sep 16, 2019 10:53 pm

Oh, I'm not so sure about this attack being beyond the Houthis technological capabilities, but more likely it was a state with a massive arsenal like Iraq's or Iran's that caused so much damage. A false flag attack like this will take days to repair get this facility up and running again. So maybe it was the Saudi's or some company subcontractor. Look at this mess:

Image

I think this video has not yet been posted here.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRmGfmqx29g
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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Sep 17, 2019 8:57 am

Ankit Panda

Huh—ballistic missiles? @WSJ? “U.S. officials shared with Saudi Arabia the intelligence reports and their assessment that Iran launched more than 20 drones and at least a dozen ballistic missiles at the Saudi oil facilities on Saturday”


U.S. Tells Saudi Arabia Oil Attacks Were Launched From Iran
Before Saturday’s strikes, and after, where a satellite image from Planet Labs Inc. shows black smoke rising from Saudi Aramco's Abqaiq oil processing facility. PHOTO: PLANET LABS VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
By Dion Nissenbaum in Beirut, Summer Said in Dubai and Jared Malsin in Tunis, Tunisia
Updated Sept. 16, 2019 11:53 pm ET
U.S. intelligence indicates Iran was the staging ground for a debilitating attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil industry, people familiar with the discussions said, as Washington and the kingdom weighed how to respond and oil prices soared.
Monday’s assessment, which the U.S. hasn’t shared publicly, came as President Trump said he hoped to avoid a war with Iran and as Saudi Arabia asked United Nations experts to help determine who was responsible for the airstrikes.
The attack sent Brent crude, the international benchmark for crude prices, soaring 15% to $69.02 a barrel on Monday, the largest gain recorded in over three decades. Higher fuel prices pose another threat to the world economy amid a U.S.-China trade dispute, although Saudi and U.S. officials said they would ensure that the oil market remains well supplied.
U.S. officials shared with Saudi Arabia the intelligence reports and their assessment that Iran launched more than 20 drones and at least a dozen missiles at the Saudi oil facilities on Saturday, the people familiar said.
But Saudi officials said the U.S. didn’t provide enough proof to conclude that the attack was launched from Iran, indicating the U.S. information wasn’t definitive. U.S. officials said they planned to share more information with the Saudis in the coming days.
Saturday’s attack on a Saudi oil facility could have long-lasting repercussions. Heard on the Street editor Spencer Jakab explains how it could impact the global markets. Photo: Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters
Unless the kingdom makes the same determination, the U.S. would have trouble galvanizing regional support for a unified response, Western officials and analysts in the region said.
In Riyadh, the Saudi military offered its first assessment on Monday, which stopped far short of accusing Iran of orchestrating the strikes.
The Saudi-led coalition fighting a war in Yemen against Iran-allied Houthi rebels said that the weapons used in the attack were Iranian made and it dismissed claims of responsibility by the Houthis.
In Washington, Mr. Trump offered a more conciliatory message toward Iran. After a weekend warning that the U.S. was “locked and loaded,” the Republican president said Monday that he wanted to avoid a war with Iran.
“Do I want war?” he said to reporters in the Oval Office. “I don’t want war with anybody.”
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has been in touch with leaders in the Middle East...
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has been in touch with leaders in the Middle East to discuss the situation. PHOTO: MICHAEL CONROY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Diplomacy, he said, is “never exhausted until the final 12 seconds.”
Mr. Trump said Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other administration officials would soon travel to Saudi Arabia.
After weighing the Trump administration information, Saudi Arabia said it was going to invite U.N. experts to investigate and would wait for the results before deciding how to respond. U.S. officials asked members of the U.N. Panel of Experts on Yemen, which investigates the origins of weapons used in the conflict, to fly to Saudi Arabia as soon as possible.
At the U.N., U.S. Ambassador Kelly Craft told the Security Council that “emerging information indicates that responsibility lies with Iran.” The U.K., a key U.S. ally, didn’t immediately assign blame for the attacks, saying it is assessing what happened and who was responsible.
U.S. and Saudi officials were split over how to respond. Some want to strike Iran militarily, while others worry an attack could trigger a wider regional fight, officials in both countries said.
The Saturday attack hit the heart of Saudi Arabia’s oil industry with a series of drone and missile strikes that left Riyadh reeling. The country is struggling to repair the damage and limit the fallout to the energy industry.
SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS

What should the next step be for Saudi Arabia and the U.S.? Join the conversation below.
Saudi Arabia is now considering whether to delay plans by Aramco, Saudi Arabia’s state oil-and-gas company, for an initial public offering, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday, citing people familiar with the matter.
The developments have already undermined efforts to broker a meeting between Mr. Trump and President Hassan Rouhani of Iran next week at the United Nations General Assembly. Iran said on Monday that its president wouldn’t meet Mr. Trump after the U.S. said it was open to such a meeting.
Mr. Rouhani said on Monday that the attack was an act of self-defense by Yemeni Houthi rebels. “Every day, Yemen is being bombed and peaceful civilians are dying,” he said during a trilateral summit with Russian and Turkish counterparts in Ankara. “When security is restored in Yemen, then it will be possible again to produce oil safely in [Saudi Arabia].”
The latest attacks pose a critical test for the U.S.-Saudi relationship, especially for Mr. Trump and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the country’s de facto ruler. They have both shifted their country’s foreign policies toward confrontation with Iran.
Related Video
The strikes on Saudi Arabia’s oil infrastructure have led to a production shutdown on a scale the world hasn’t seen for decades. It could have long-lasting consequences for global markets and politics. Photo: Reuters
Mr. Trump met Monday with his national security team to discuss the attacks on Saudi Arabia and escalating tensions in the Middle East, a person familiar with the meetings said.
Mr. Trump and his team, which included Secretary of Defense Mark Esper and acting national security adviser Charles Kupperman, discussed possible military action against Iran, but made no decisions, a second person familiar with the discussions said.
On Monday, Mr. Trump said he is not yet considering military options and that he expects Saudi Arabia to play a central role in any response.
“The fact is the Saudis are going to have a lot of involvement in this, if we decide to do something,” he said.
Robert Malley, president of International Crisis Group and former White House Middle East coordinator under President Obama, said, “Both President Trump and Mohammed bin Salman feel the need to respond but neither wants war. The question is how they achieve the former without provoking the latter.”
The U.S. has taken the lead in providing security for the Persian Gulf monarchies for decades in part out of a strategy of protecting the world’s oil supply. As a result, observers of the region expect Saudi Arabia might defer any military action to the U.S.
“At the end of the day, conventional military action is a last resort for any state, and it is something that would be done in coordination with regional and international stakeholders,” said Mohamed Alyahya, a Saudi political analyst and editor of the English website of Saudi-owned al-Arabiya television.
“Any reaction whatsoever, or lack thereof, will have significant consequences on the future of the region,” he said.
On Monday, Mr. Trump tweeted a reminder of Iran’s behavior when it shot down a U.S. drone in June, a strike that led the U.S. to prepare a military strike against Iran. Mr. Trump called off the strike after having second thoughts.
“Remember when Iran shot down a drone, saying knowingly that it was in their ‘airspace’ when, in fact, it was nowhere close,” he wrote. “They stuck strongly to that story knowing that it was a very big lie. Now they say they had nothing to do with the attack on Saudi Arabia. We’ll see?”
The weekend strikes marked the most significant attack in a simmering conflict pitting the U.S. and its Middle East allies against Iran and its proxies around the region.
Mr. Trump imposed crippling sanctions on Iran that have delivered a blow to the country’s economy.
Iran’s crude oil production capacity was nearly 4 million barrels a day before the revival of U.S. sanctions, making it a leading oil supplier. The country’s refining capacity now is about half that amount.
In recent months, the U.S. has accused Iran of carrying out a series of attacks in the region, including blasts that crippled several tankers in the Persian Gulf.
Amid the heightened tensions, the U.S. sent warships, jet fighters, bombers and troops to the Middle East, including more than 500 military personnel and a squadron of fighters to the Prince Sultan Air Base in Saudi Arabia. Much of that buildup remains in place, officials said.
The prospect of U.S. military action drew divergent reactions from lawmakers. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.) called over the weekend for the U.S. to put an attack on Iranian oil refineries “on the table.”
Others cautioned against military action. Sen. Mitt Romney (R., Utah) warned on Twitter Monday that any “direct engagement by U.S. military in response to Iran’s attacks on Saudi oil infrastructure would be a grave mistake.”
Sen. Tim Kaine (D., Va.) was more blunt: “The U.S. should never go to war to protect Saudi oil,” he tweeted on Sunday.
Saturday’s strikes demonstrated how a war with Iran could be devastating for Saudi Arabia, with the lifeblood of the kingdom’s economy vulnerable to attack despite hundreds of billions of dollars spent on its military.
The attacks have amplified the pressure on the Saudi government to respond. Its air defenses have failed to stop the attacks on Saturday and other incidents involving the Houthis in the months before, despite the kingdom having the world’s third-largest military budget.
Among other weapons, the kingdom has both American-made Patriot and Hawk missile systems, both of which have failed to stop a series of drone and missile attacks since May. The Saudi government says it has shot down several drones in the past.
—Isabel Coles, Vivian Salama, Lindsay Wise, David Gauthier-Villars and Ian Talley contributed to this article.

Officials say intelligence points to Iran as staging ground for strikes, as allies weigh retaliation
https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-tells- ... 1568644126


seemslikeadream » Sat Sep 14, 2019 7:04 pm wrote:
Pompeo accuses Iran of 'unprecedented attack' after drones hit Saudi oil facilities
https://www.foxnews.com/politics/pompeo ... -saudi-oil

Graham: US should consider strike on Iranian oil refineries after attack on Saudi Arabia
https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/461 ... -attack-on

Yemen's Houthi rebels claim a 'large-scale' drone attack on Saudi oil facilities
https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/14/middleea ... index.html

Drone attack by Yemeni rebels sets off fires at major Saudi Arabian oil facilities
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/wor ... 325055001/

Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire after drone attacks
7 minutes ago
Updated

Video: Drone attack in Saudi Arabia causes fire at an Aramco factory in Abqaiq (ABC News)
Yemen's Iran-aligned Houthi group have attacked and set fire to two oil plants central to Saudi Arabia's oil production, including the world's biggest petroleum processing facility.

Key points:

Drones have attacked Saudi Arabia's biggest oil facilities, causing huge fires
It is not clear if there were any injuries in the attacks or if oil production will be impacted
Yemen's Iran-backed Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for the attacks
Saudi Arabia said it had brought the blazes under control, but three sources close to the matter said oil production and exports had been disrupted from the Saudi Aramco facilities.

Yemen's Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for the attack on the Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq and the second drone strike on Khurais — the country's second largest oil field.

The group's military spokesman said the attacks were carried out by 10 drones and promised to continue its attacks on Saudi Arabia.

"These attacks are our right, and we warn the Saudis that our targets will keep expanding," spokesman Yahya Saree said in a statement read out on the rebels' Al Masirah TV.

"We have the right to strike back in retaliation to the air strikes and the targeting of our civilians for the last five years."

Half of Saudi Arabia's oil exports potentially affected

Looking across a Saudi Arabian desert field, you electric cable towers as the horizon is blanketed by dark grey smoke. Photo: Smoke billowed across the horizon following the drone strike in Abqaiq. (Reuters)
The drone strikes on the world's biggest oil exporter come as Saudi Aramco accelerates plans for an initial public offering of the state oil giant to as early as this year, and follow earlier cross-border attacks on Saudi oil installations and on oil tankers in Gulf waters.

The attacks appeared to be the most brazen yet.

Online videos apparently shot in Buqyaq, which is some 330 kilometres north-east of the capital Riyadh, included the sound of gunfire in the background and flames shooting out of the Abqaiq oil processing facility.

Smoke rose over the skyline and glowing flames could be seen a distance away.

Australia's secret arms deals

Australia's secret arms deals

The Australian Government has approved the export of dozens of shipments of military items to Middle Eastern countries embroiled in the bloody Yemen war.
Authorities have not reported on casualties. A Reuters witness nearby said at least 15 ambulances were seen in the area and there was a heavy security presence around Abqaiq.

The oil processing plant handles crude from the world's largest conventional oilfield, the supergiant Ghawar, and for export to terminals Ras Tanura — the world's biggest offshore oil loading facility — and Juaymah.

One source said 5 million barrels per day of crude production had been impacted — close to half the kingdom's output — but did not elaborate.

State television said exports were continuing but Aramco has yet to comment since the pre-dawn attack and authorities have not said whether oil production or exports were affected.

Who are the Houthi rebels?

Several people inspect huge amounts of rubble at the destroyed prison complex Photo: At least 100 people were killed at a Houthi detention centre by Saudi-led airstrikes in early September. (AP: Hani Mohammed)
The Houthi rebels have been battling a Saudi-led coalition of regional countries since 2015, when the coalition intervened in Yemen in support of President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, who had been forced out of power by the Houthis.

Saudi Arabia, leading a Sunni Muslim military coalition that intervened in Yemen in 2015 against the Houthis, has blamed Iran for previous attacks, which Tehran denies.

The Iran-backed rebels hold Yemen's capital, Sanaa, and other territory in the Arab world's poorest country.

Riyadh accuses Iran of arming the Houthis, a charge denied by the group and Tehran.

Who's who in the Yemen conflict

Who's who in the Yemen conflict
Yemen has been in the grip of an increasingly complex civil war since 2011, as several competing factions fight for control of the Middle East's poorest country.
The war has become one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis.

The violence has pushed Yemen to the brink of famine and killed more than 90,000 people since 2015, according to the US-based Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project, which tracks the conflict.

The coalition launches air strikes almost every day, while the Houthis often fire missiles into Saudi Arabia.

Since the start of the Saudi-led war, Houthi rebels have been using drones in combat.

The first appeared to be off-the-shelf, hobby-kit-style drones, but later, versions nearly identical to Iranian models turned up. Iran denies supplying the Houthis with weapons.

The Houthis launched drone attacks targeting Saudi Arabia's crucial East-West Pipeline in May as tensions heightened between Iran and the US.

A man carries a young girl through rubble after an air strike in Yemen. Photo: A man carries a child rescued from the site of a Saudi-led air strike that killed eight of her family members in Sanaa, Yemen in 2017. (Reuters: Khaled Abdullah)
UN investigators said the Houthis' new UAV-X drone, found in recent months during the Saudi-led coalition's war in Yemen, likely has a range of up to 1,500 kilometres.

That puts the far reaches of both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in range.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-14/ ... s/11513728


Pompeo is a Rapturist. Maybe he thinks war with Iran can spread to Israel and become the Final Battle.

Team Trump compares Saudi attack to 9/11

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"The Saudis are going to have a lot of involvement in this if we decide to do something ... and that includes payment and they understand that fully," Trump tells @jonkarl when asked if he thinks it's the responsibility of the Saudis to defend themselves http://abcn.ws/30gqPTO


emptywheel

It seems that Congress shouldn't accept Admin claims abt the Saudi attack until they learn whether the whistleblower complaint to ICIG pertained to Gina Haspel lying about intel on same on orders from Mike Pompeo.




Ryan Goodman

While Sec. Pompeo very quickly blames Iran for drone strikes on Saudi oil facilities, note how others (UK, France, Germany, EU) don't.

UK specifically calls on Houthis to cease attacks.

EU says need to "clearly establish the facts and determine responsibility."
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https://twitter.com/rgoodlaw/status/1173659042490789889


White House to stand down on Iran

Dartagnan
Community
Monday September 16, 2019 · 8:17 AM CDT

Following the drone attacks this weekend on Saudi Arabian oil fields by Houthi rebels in Yemen, attacks that have purportedly damaged half of Saudi Arabia’s oil capacity and temporarily disrupted the flow of five percent of the world’s oil output, Donald Trump tweeted last night that the United States was “locked and loaded,” and ready to punish those responsible.

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Saudi Arabia oil supply was attacked. There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification, but are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed!

82K
5:50 PM - Sep 15, 2019
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“Locked and loaded” sounds pretty threatening. And it’s obviously a phrase intended to impress Trump’s Fox News -watching, chest-thumping, aging, white male base, tingling whatever is left of their testosterone in between their multiple trips to the bathroom.

Since the Houthi rebels are being backed by Iran in what has essentially become a proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia, it seems a fairly reasonable supposition that Iran was aware of and may have even planned the attack themselves. And, in fact, the administration stated as much over the weekend, albeit with no evidence to support the accusation.

Washington (CNN)Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pinned the blame on Iran for an attack at a Saudi oil field in a pair of tweets Saturday.

***

"Amid all the calls for de-escalation, Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the world's energy supply. There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen," Pompeo continued, providing no evidence that Iran was behind the attacks.


But Trump’s pals in the Kremlin have a close, strategic and economic relationship with Iran, and all this “tough talk” makes them jittery. So this morning Uncle Vlad dispatched one of his minions to send their White House lackey a clear signal to stand down.

MOSCOW, Sept 16 (Reuters) - Russia on Monday urged countries in the Middle East and outside the region not to draw “hasty conclusions” on who staged the attacks on Saudi oil facilities.

***

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov, asked about the U.S. statement, said: “We have a negative attitude towards rising tensions in the region and call for all countries in the region and outside of it to avoid any hasty steps or conclusions which may deepen destabilisation.”

In a separate statement on Monday, Russia’s foreign ministry said it believed that the exchange of strikes on civilian targets was “a direct consequence of the ongoing sharp military and political crisis in Yemen”.


They couldn’t have made their directive to Trump any clearer. In fact, they even threw him a bone to make sure he was paying attention.

“We believe it is counterproductive to use what happened to increase tensions around Iran in line with the well-known U.S. policy,” the foreign ministry said.


Isn’t that nice of them to credit our policy?

Lo and behold, just as the Kremlin issued its “warning,” here’s what we get from the White House: backtracking.

President Trump's claim the US is “locked and loaded” may not refer to military action, the vice president’s chief of staff said Monday, calling the term tweeted by Trump “broad.”

“I think that locked and loaded is a broad term and talks about the realities that we’re all far safer and more secure domestically from energy independence,” Marc Short told reporters on the White House lawn. “This is not the 1970s oil embargo. It’s not 1990 when Iraq invaded Kuwait. We’re now a net oil exporter which means that the American market is much better protected.”


Right.

Nice to be reminded of who is calling the shots now.
https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2019/9 ... wn-on-Iran
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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Sep 17, 2019 2:48 pm

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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby DrEvil » Wed Sep 18, 2019 5:36 pm

Saudi Arabia bombs hospitals, markets and weddings: *crickets*

Someone bombs Saudi refinery and kills no one: Oh my god, this is horrible! How dare they!

If the Houthis (or whoever did this) can keep it up for a few years the Saudis are fucked. Waging genocidal war is expensive, and so is paying off your entire population to not rise up against you.

As a bonus it will accelerate the adoption of EVs and alternative energy sources.
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Re: Saudi Arabia's largest oil processing facility on fire

Postby Iamwhomiam » Sat Sep 21, 2019 11:04 am

Discussion on this topic continues in the "Coming Soon - War with Iran" thread beginning with slad's post here: http://www.rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewtopic.php?p=677641#p677641. While I believe the Houtis are fully capable of the attacks on the Saudi oil installations, I also believe they did not carry out any of the recent attacks. I believe they were all false flag attacks. If this is true, the Houti cease fire was a brilliant strategy meant to discourage any further false flag operations by Saudi Arabia or its agents throughout its enforcement.
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