One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

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One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Heaven Swan » Fri Aug 11, 2017 6:46 am

One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite. Preface & Chapter 1.

Posted on August 8, 2017 by trustyourperceptions
https://trustyourperceptions.wordpress. ... chapter-1/

Image

LYDIA CACHO IS ALIVE TODAY. But tomorrow, Lydia Cacho could be killed. – Because Mexican journalist Lydia Cacho cracked her local Pedo Elite – a brotherhood of rich men who rape girl-children. Tomorrow Lydia Cacho could be killed because she is now pushing further yet – following the trail from her local Pedo Elite to top-level networks trafficking girls, the global suppliers – the Russian, Albanian, Italian, Japanese and Chinese mafias, the Latin American drug cartels, – the international Uber-Patriarchy itself, that is – owners and operators of the international recreational assault market, reaping billion dollar profits in what has increasingly become the global sex-trafficking of girl-children.

Men around the world want to recreationally assault girl-children. Men’s demand in the female assault market (ie, “prostitution/forced prostitution/sex-trafficking”) has pivoted from young women to girl-children. For example, from her investigative work, Lydia Cacho has learned the Russian Mafia has saturated the Internet with girl-child porn, “infomercials” in effect, to drive the demand for their product. As men’s global demand has shifted to girl-children, supply has had to keep pace. Girls ages 4-17 are now being enslaved by these multi-national rape-dealers to be continuously sold. The Uber-Patriarchy has found their girl-child enterprise far more lucrative than their other business ventures, because – unlike cocaine, a girl-child can be sold again and again.

As more younger and younger girls are brought into the global market, the total number of all females of all ages ensnared by these assault-suppliers is staggering: According to Lydia Cacho, the total number of females world-wide now enslaved for captive rape now exceeds the total number of Africans enslaved in the Americas over the entire duration of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.

In the male rank system – Uber-Patriarchy, Alpha-Patriarchy, Beta-Patriarchy, – males of the highest rank, – international Uber-Patriarchy males, – are conferred impunity – freedom from scrutiny, freedom from accountability, freedom to commit crimes as they wish. Because Lydia Cacho is determined to tell the world their crimes, – tomorrow Lydia Cacho could be killed.

Powerful men have told her to stop or she will be raped and bludgeoned to death, – that her corpse will be hacked into pieces, – that those who love her won’t find those pieces. Hired goons constantly tail her. Already she has survived their torture. But none of these men and none of their goons have stopped Lydia Cacho. No they have not… In fact, every time they commit atrocities against her to make her stop her feminist work, Lydia Cacho undertakes even more courageous feminist work.

This is the story of how one woman cracked her local Pedo Elite. This is the story of Lydia Cacho. – A story which starts at the beginning.


Chapter 1

A feminist gave birth to Lydia Cacho. Feminist Paulette Ribeiro Monteiro birthed six children, including daughter Lydia. Lydia Cacho’s mother founded a women’s development organization in Mexico City’s slums. Fighting for women’s rights and against poverty, she often brought Lydia along: “I can’t imagine my mother could have any idea just what effect seeing those little girls in the slums…would have on my soul,” Lydia Cacho said. “While she and her colleagues gave talks, I would attempt to play with my peers, only to discover with alarm how girls my age were physically unable to hold a pencil [due to malnutrition]… At that age, somewhere between 7 and 10, a child has no idea what to do with the strange feeling brewing inside her that some omnipotent force is lying to us and controlling our reality… I later learned patriarchy was (its) name…” When Lydia Cacho was12-years-old, the first World Conference on Women’s Rights, – the 1975 UN Conference for Women, – convened in Mexico City. There, the world’s feminists declared: ‘Women of the entire world, whatever differences exist between them, share the painful experience of receiving or having received unequal treatment, and that as their awareness of this phenomenon increases, they will become natural allies in the struggle against any form of oppression, such as is practiced under colonialism, neo-colonialism, Zionism, racial discrimination and apartheid, thereby constituting an enormous revolutionary potential…’

continue reading at:
https://trustyourperceptions.wordpress. ... chapter-1/
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby elfismiles » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:28 am

Wow! Thanks for posting this.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Jerky » Fri Aug 11, 2017 1:10 pm

See, now THIS is what working to uncover sex criminals in high places actually looks like.

Jerky
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Heaven Swan » Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:02 am

:wave: Elfismiles and Jerky.

Glad you're back Jerky.

I'm still reading this but see that Lydia Cacho did a real, in depth investigation, traveling all over the world. She's the first one to step back and set her sights on the entire, international child sexual exploitation machine, not just zero on on certain details. She observes the different categories of abusers, from the 'elite' who operate with quasi impunity to the regular Joes who run more risk of being caught but are often let go or receive slap on the wrist sentences. She observes the contribution of organized crime groupings but doesn't leave out the collusion, cover-up and participation as abusers by governments and government actors.

I'm in awe of Lydia-- a genuine hero who's paid a high price for her trailblazing work.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby liminalOyster » Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:52 pm

This is an outstanding piece, though I'm not all the way through it. Thank you very much for sharing it.

ps. a sidenote that the semen/chem warfare piece on same blog is a pretty brilliant thought experiment, in its own way.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Heaven Swan » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:43 pm

liminalOyster » Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:52 pm wrote:This is an outstanding piece, though I'm not all the way through it. Thank you very much for sharing it.

ps. a sidenote that the semen/chem warfare piece on same blog is a pretty brilliant thought experiment, in its own way.


I'd have to reread it to say anything worthwhile about that piece, but I remember thinking it was over the top. Not sure if that sort of thing is helpful in any way.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Iamwhomiam » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:53 pm

I attribute the "over the top" you describe to the writer's poor writing, which is far too wordy. Were this edited down, it could be a much more powerful piece, imho.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby liminalOyster » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:31 pm

Heaven Swan » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:43 pm wrote:
liminalOyster » Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:52 pm wrote:This is an outstanding piece, though I'm not all the way through it. Thank you very much for sharing it.

ps. a sidenote that the semen/chem warfare piece on same blog is a pretty brilliant thought experiment, in its own way.


I'd have to reread it to say anything worthwhile about that piece, but I remember thinking it was over the top. Not sure if that sort of thing is helpful in any way.


It's very over the top but it's an oddly cogent attempt to think in a new way. Interesting more as an experiment than anything.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Heaven Swan » Sun Aug 13, 2017 9:41 am

Not sure if we're talking about the same article Iamwhoiam. LO was referring to another post on the OP's blog.

Well, Liminal Oyster, if you define that article as a brilliant thought experiment I'll def give it another read, but my first priority is to finish all the chapters of the OP article on Lydia Cacho, my new shero.

:backtotopic:
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Iamwhomiam » Sun Aug 13, 2017 3:58 pm

Heaven Swan » Sun Aug 13, 2017 9:41 am wrote:Not sure if we're talking about the same article Iamwhoiam. LO was referring to another post on the OP's blog.


I don't know what you're commenting on, HS, if not your OP. My comment was about whoever wrote the piece on Lydia Cacho. It seems this one article of several chapters is all that appears on the blog the OP came from.

Aside the author's wordiness, this by LO is what prompted my comment:

This is an outstanding piece, though I'm not all the way through it. Thank you very much for sharing it.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby elfismiles » Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:39 am

Linking to the actual article might clear things up...

Semen: Men’s Chemical War Against Women. Part I: Male Chemical Munitions: what semen does to females.
Posted on May 15, 2016
https://trustyourperceptions.wordpress. ... o-females/

... assuming that is what y'all are talking about. :backtotopic:

Iamwhomiam » 13 Aug 2017 19:58 wrote:
Heaven Swan » Sun Aug 13, 2017 9:41 am wrote:Not sure if we're talking about the same article Iamwhoiam. LO was referring to another post on the OP's blog.


I don't know what you're commenting on, HS, if not your OP. My comment was about whoever wrote the piece on Lydia Cacho. It seems this one article of several chapters is all that appears on the blog the OP came from.

Aside the author's wordiness, this by LO is what prompted my comment:

This is an outstanding piece, though I'm not all the way through it. Thank you very much for sharing it.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Iamwhomiam » Mon Aug 14, 2017 1:34 pm

Thanks, smiles. I stopped scrolling when I reached the links to the next chapters. I was totally lost! Sorry for the confusion, LO & all.

My concerns relate to hpv transfer from men to women during intercourse as primary cause for cervical cancer. (perhaps cancer cells as well) More reading to do...
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Heaven Swan » Mon Aug 14, 2017 9:02 pm

Thanks Elfismiles for the clarification.

Just finished Part 2.
Wow. A cinematic rendering of Lydia Cachos's story would be the most enthralling movie ever made. The story is chock full of action and suspense, stars a bonafide mythic hero and has an abundance of uncanny and surprising twists and turns.

And seeing her real-life success in going after high-level perps gives me hope that in our lifetimes, we'll be able to witness and celebrate the taking down of the corrupt international child sexual exploitation network.

:cheerleader:
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby Iamwhomiam » Tue Aug 15, 2017 3:27 pm

Yes, it should. Everyone should know about her and her efforts rescuing girls and women and her work in bringing to justice their abusers and traffickers. An unforgettable story, really.
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Re: One Woman Cracks the Pedo Elite

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Aug 15, 2017 8:08 pm

Jeff » Tue Jul 10, 2007 6:22 am wrote:Thanks for posting this. I touched on this story in this blog post:


Nacif, as his friend Succar, is a Lebanese emigre with a nasty reputation that long precedes the publication of Cacho's book. Mexico's "King of Denim" has "the unsavory habit of frequently changing the name of his many companies, in order to avoid paying debts, taxes and accumulated worker benefits to those laid off." And six years ago the Sun Herald wrote that "Mexican textile magnate Kamel Nacif has been a familiar face at Las Vegas gambling tables for some 30 years, using phony identification to wager at Caesars Palace when he was still in his late teens. He remains, however, a bit of a multimillionaire mystery man, long suspected by Nevada Gaming Control Board agents of money laundering and arms and narcotics dealing."

(Coincidentally, it was an expat Lebanese crime family operating in the Caribbean Basin that FBI undercover operative Darlene Novinger was investigating in 1982, when she reportedly, and unfortunately, discovered the Bush family implicated in its narcotics trade.)
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=12294&p=121083&hilit=Lydia+Cacho#p121083




RIGOROUS INTUITION

WHAT YOU DON'T KNOW CAN'T HURT THEM


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2006

What lies beneath


Told about Jesus, told about the rain,
Told me about the jungle where her brothers were slain
By a man who danced on the roof of the embassy. - Bob Dylan

I've just time today to briefly note a story from Mexico that may remind readers of many other stories (with thanks to starroute for the thread on the RI discussion board):

Writer Who Exposed Child Sex Ring Fears Worst Is Yet to Come

MEXICO CITY, Feb 24 (IPS) - When Mexican freelance journalist and human rights activist Lydia Cacho published a book last year exposing a paedophile ring ["Los demonios del Edén" (The Demons of Eden)], she was warned by friends and colleagues that she would run into trouble.

It did not take long for their warnings to come true. She was arrested by the police, driven 900 kms to the state of Puebla, held for 30 hours, mistreated and threatened. Now that she is the target of the wrath of powerful Mexican businessmen and politicians, she is worried that the worst is yet to come.

...

More recently, she was dragged into a scandal after a dozen taped telephone conversations were leaked to the press and broadcast on Feb. 14. In the obscenity-laced conversations, a voice identified as that of Mario Marín, the governor of the state of Puebla, can be heard telling a man who is allegedly textile mogul Kamel Nacif that "I just gave a bump on the head to that old witch."

In her book, Cacho described Nacif as a friend of Jean Succar, a Lebanese-born businessman who is facing charges of arranging paedophile parties.

The illegally taped phone conversations attributed to the governor and various individuals, including a reporter, apparently took place in December, after Cacho was taken into custody by the police in the southeastern resort town of Cancún and driven to Puebla.

In the conversations, the voices identified as those of Nacif and Marín discuss how they had the activist arrested and thrown into a cell with "nutcases and dykes (lesbians)," so that she would be raped. That did not happen, however, because in the prison in Puebla, "the prisoners themselves and the guards protected me," said the writer. But she was mistreated. Cacho described how she was threatened during the nearly 20-hour trip to Puebla and was only allowed to eat once.

...


Cacho, who is also the co-founder of the Centro Integral de Apoyo a la Mujer (CIAM), a shelter for victims of domestic violence and rape in her home base of Cancún, interviewed many of Succar's victims for her book. The youngsters described how the hotel owner sexually abused them himself, set up a prostitution ring to allow others to abuse them, and photographed them in order to sell the pornographic images on the Internet.

This case is just one thread in a vast web of similar rings throughout Mexico.


Nacif, as his friend Succar, is a Lebanese emigre with a nasty reputation that long precedes the publication of Cacho's book. Mexico's "King of Denim" has "the unsavory habit of frequently changing the name of his many companies, in order to avoid paying debts, taxes and accumulated worker benefits to those laid off." And six years ago the Sun Herald wrote that "Mexican textile magnate Kamel Nacif has been a familiar face at Las Vegas gambling tables for some 30 years, using phony identification to wager at Caesars Palace when he was still in his late teens. He remains, however, a bit of a multimillionaire mystery man, long suspected by Nevada Gaming Control Board agents of money laundering and arms and narcotics dealing."

(Coincidentally, it was an expat Lebanese crime family operating in the Caribbean Basin that FBI undercover operative Darlene Novinger was investigating in 1982, when she reportedly, and unfortunately, discovered the Bush family implicated in its narcotics trade.)

Nacif filed his suit in the south central province of Puebla, where most of his textile sweatshops are located, and where he could call on his friend the governor to protect his good name, though the crimes in which he is implicated occured in Cancún. (Where last week, a Canadian couple had their throats slit in their hotel room on the eve of their daughter's wedding. Nothing was stolen and the wife was not raped, and Mexican authorities are being markedly uncooperative.) The scandal "of personal power and cronyism" is likely to cost Marin his governorship, but as El Universal editorialized yesterday, that's just the public scandal of "the powerful protecting the powerful." Behind it "is something much more hideous."

There certainly seems to be something about Mexico, and at least some of that has to do with its proximity to hidden American hands. It was allegedly the destination of the children and their minders in the troubling Finders case. ("Once in custody the men were somewhat evasive in their answers to the police regarding the children and stated only that they both were the children's teachers and that all were enroute to Mexico to establish a school for brilliant children.") In little more than a decade, thousands of young women, mostly factory workers, have been raped, tortured and murdered in the borderland maquiladoras without justice being served. ("We believe this is a binational crime," says Emma Perez of the Coalition Against Violence Toward Women and Families on the Border. "And because it's happening on an international border, it requires international involvement," she says. "How many more women have to be murdered for this to be taken seriously?") In November 2004, a crowd "angry about recent child kidnappings cornered plainclothes federal agents taking photos of students at a school on Mexico City's outskirts and burned the officers alive." And as David McGowan writes in Programmed to Kill, one of Henry Lee Lucas's more extravagent claims was that he laboured for a cult as an "abductor of children, whom he delivered to a ranch in Mexico near Juarez. Once there, they were used in the production of child pornography and for ritual sacrifices. Henry has said that this cult's operations were based in Texas, and included trafficking in children and drugs."

Ugly things lie buried everywhere, though in the United States you might not know it if all you know is broadcast journalism. And that's most Americans. Until they regenerate a legitimate media, it may take looking elsewhere, where the graves are more shallow, to see what lies beneath.
http://rigorousintuition.blogspot.com/2 ... chive.html


isachar » Fri Jan 26, 2007 3:02 pm wrote:Of interest. I wonder what happened to the kids sent to Fla? No one in the US seems interested in investigating this.

http://www.clevescene.com/Issues/2007-0 ... ure_1.html

From clevescene.com
Originally published by Cleveland Scene 2007-01-17
©2005 New Times, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pedophile Inc.
Professor Robert Cikraji retired to the center of an international scandal.
By Rebecca Meiser


Walter Novak

Robert Cikraji never expected to become an informant for the U.S. government.


AP Images

Jean Succar Kuri presided over an international pedophile ring before fleeing to California.


Robert Cikraji

Gunshots woke the residents of the Solymar resort in Mexico.


AP Images

After her exposé on Succar's pedophile ring came out, Lydia Cacho received death threats.


AP Images

Jose Kamel Nacif Borge allegedly conspired to have a whistleblower raped in jail.


Who / What:
Robert Cikraji
Solymar

At age 53, Robert Cikraji's health was failing. The social-science professor had always been a sickly sort. In high school, he spent two years in bed with pneumonia; his lungs never fully recovered.
So it was of little surprise when his respiratory system collapsed again in 1998. For one scary week, he lay in Mansfield General's intensive care unit. When he regained consciousness, his doctor greeted him with an admonition: If Cikraji wanted to pull another 15 years from his life, he'd better start looking for a warm, dry place to live.

Cikraji immediately thought of Mexico. The weathered professor, with his wisps of white hair pushed to the side, always had a soft spot for the country's salty shores and white beaches. At the University of Dayton, he'd spent a semester in the Mexican mountains, helping with a clean-water project. And as a professor at Ashland University, he'd written a book on the city of Chichen Itza.

"I've always been intrigued by the architecture of the Aztecs and Mayans," Cikraji says. "Maybe because it wasn't possible for me to drive to Europe."

With his wife Kaori and their young son, Cikraji flew to Cancùn, looking for an affordable waterfront place near the airport. He found it in Solymar, a sprawling collection of luxury villas, a main hotel, and time-share condos.

For a year, Cikraji spent his afternoons on a patio working on a children's book about Mayan cities. At night, he relaxed at the hotel bar, striking up conversations with residents, guests, and bartenders. His pale skin was bronzed to the color of a penny, and his mind relaxed for the first time in ages.

By 2000, the resort announced that it was getting a new owner. Residents greeted Jean Succar Kuri with cheer. Under the old owner, the common area hadn't been kept up. The roof was leaking, the pool was collecting debris, and residents were having little luck subletting their condos.

Succar lived in both Mexico and the United States, and owned a string of popular shops and restaurants throughout Cancùn and California. He promised to turn Solymar into a first-rate destination.

But the new owner soon proved a man of mystery. He built a private drive to his gated, oceanfront villa, where he arrived each day in an SUV with tinted windows. And though Mexican newspapers reported that the Solymar was completely booked, Cikraji saw few visitors at the hotel. At night, he often shared the pool lounge and restaurant with bored resort staff.

Then there were the men who pulled up to the hotel each day -- always single, arriving without wives or kids. Though they were dropped off at the curb, they never actually entered the resort. Instead, a taxi would soon whisk them away again.

Cikraji became suspicious. In Mexico, hotels are known for laundering money. With their bars, restaurants, and unverifiable occupancy rates, they're the perfect venues for washing dirty money clean.

The professor came to a sad conclusion: He'd retired to the center of an international money-laundering ring.



Jean Succar didn't present himself in the distinguished manner of the hospitality industry. With a head like a bowling ball, the native of Lebanon stood just 5 foot 4, compensating with a Napoleonic posture and commanding voice. He could be charming one instant, hostile and stony-eyed the next.

"He was just an ordinary man, not by nature an intimidating person," says Alfonso Tamayo, a Solymar resident. "But he tried to make people afraid of him."

Tamayo once overheard Succar bragging about having had an enemy shot. And the owner was often seen walking hand in hand with girls as young as eight. There was something about the leering, hungry way he looked at the kids that gave residents chills.

One American resident suspected that Succar was having sex with the kids. Tamayo thought the theory absurd, but couldn't ignore the oddities. Nor could Cikraji.

Once, early on in the takeover, the professor was called to Succar's villa to talk about a resort matter. When he arrived, Succar was on the phone. Outside, a young child sat by the pool, fiddling with her bathing suit. When the owner turned toward her, the young girl lifted up her tunic to expose herself. "Jean, Jean," she said. "I think I have an infection."

"Oh, it does look like an infection," Succar replied nonchalantly. "I'll call the doctor."

Cikraji was upset by the incident, especially when a friend recounted a similar tale. The man had seen Succar walking to his villa with a few preteen girls one day. Succar smiled and gestured toward the girls, as if they were horses on parade at an auction. "Look what I have for you," he said to the man suggestively. "I'll give to you any of them."

But Cikraji still suspected drugs or money laundering. So he took his concerns to the U.S. consulate, where he was referred to the Drug Enforcement Agency office in Mérida, three hours away. Officials told him to keep a journal of what he saw.

Cikraji took to the role like a young cop with his first badge. He'd always fancied himself an unofficial officer of morality and rule. More than once, he'd been accused of possessing an overdeveloped sense of justice.

In the '70s, he'd worked with César Chávez on the famous grape and lettuce boycotts. As a professor at Ashland University in the mid-1990s, he'd published papers about ways to accommodate people with AIDS. At the time, some people -- including his conservative Protestant employers -- still thought of AIDS as a gay disease. The university didn't take well to his suggestions. Cikraji persisted anyway.

"Good or bad, Bob's not willing to compromise his views on things," explains his longtime Cleveland lawyer, Kevin Roberts.

Cikraji especially loathed the drug trade, not so much for the drugs themselves, but for the way it exploited its low-end labor. So from his perch on the stairs overlooking the resort entrance, he spent 15 months dutifully recording license plates, sending them to the DEA.

"Bob's a high-energy, highly motivated guy," says friend Joe Lloid, a retired anesthetist now living in Denver. "He's no quitter."

But nothing came of his reports, and his evidence never rose above suspicion.

It wasn't until Mexican TV blew up Succar's real scheme that Cikraji's fears proved founded.



When Cikraji went to see friend Shannon Santora in November of 2003, her hands were shaking, eyes round and wild. "You won't believe what's on TV and in the paper," she gushed. "Succar has been running a pedophile ring from the Solymar."

A former victim had lured Succar to a restaurant, where she baited him into a confession -- all while secretly videotaping the meeting. The tape was now exploding on Mexican television.

In the short segment, the victim, face obscured by shadows, sits opposite Succar. The woman asks the ages of his recent conquests.

"Some 16, 17 years old," he brags. "All of them bleed with me."

Disgusted, the victim questions Succar about having sex with a five-year-old girl.

"I only touched her once, her and her friend," he says defensively.

But how can he do this to children this young? the woman pleads, her voice breaking.

Succar confesses that it "drives me crazy to do it like this . . . That's my vice, it is my stupidity." But he goes on, eyes glazed, to describe his special technique for penetrating young children -- "two fingers" inside, he says, before he "rams" them with his "dick." He smirks as he recounts the experience.

The video cuts off with a gleeful Succar explaining how it felt to be inside the victim's younger sister. "I felt really great . . . I felt -- shit, man! -- that I had won the lottery!"

In the coming days, more young victims approached Mexican police. Succar, they explained, presided over a worldwide pedophile ring. He had a website, inviting predators from around the globe to stay at his resort. The children said they'd been molested on videotape, which Succar provided to customers as a "souvenir" of their time in Cancùn.

Mexican police launched a manhunt. Interpol was called. But Succar was nowhere to be found.

Cikraji thought it impossible for the resort owner to escape the country quickly. So he went to Succar's villa, where workers were scrambling back and forth from two large trucks. They carried bulging garbage bags and kept glancing worriedly toward the road.

When one worker set a bag down, Cikraji peeked in. It was filled with videotapes.

Cikraji grabbed the bag, then stopped.

"I thought about doing it, but it's still a theft offense," the professor explains.

Later that night, he chastised himself for his cowardice. The videos, no doubt, would have nailed Succar. They also would have helped identify the men who came to Mexico for underage girls.

If he had another chance, he vowed, he would find the bravery to act. "I want these people to shit their pants. I want them to worry who's going to see them having sex with a seven-year-old."



On November 26, 2003, the U.S. issued a warrant for Succar's arrest. Authorities believed he'd fled to the States.

U.S. Marshals traced him to Los Angeles. But before they could arrest Succar, someone in Mexico tipped him off.

It would be three months before they tracked his cell-phone calls to Arizona. On February 5, 2004, marshals apprehended Succar during a traffic stop. He was charged with four counts of sexual assault.

A few weeks after the arrest, Cikraji flew to Ohio to visit his wife. The previous year, Kaori had left Mexico to work on her doctorate at the University of Dayton. He called Reid Pixler, the assistant U.S. Attorney in Arizona in charge of the case. They talked for 45 minutes; Cikraji told Pixler about the tapes he'd seen in Succar's villa. They promised to stay in touch.

A month later, Cikraji flew back to Cancùn. He tried to resume work on his children's book, but the words wouldn't come. Residents and staff were on edge.

Some 40 burly, gangster-looking men had taken up residence, roaming the resort and glaring menacingly at residents.

"They looked like they were members of a garrison," Tamayo says. "We were afraid that there was going to be an armed confrontation."

After Succar fled, his lawyer, Andrade Abogados, had assumed control of the property as collateral for unpaid legal bills. The men had been sent by Succar's younger brother, Edmund, to reassert family ownership. A turf war was about to take place.

Cikraji, thinking the U.S. government should know about this, told his friend Tamayo to get a camera. Tamayo kneeled behind a building, snapping photos before a goon caught him.

"Give me your camera," the man growled.

Tamayo handed it over. The goon took out the camera's memory card, threw it over his shoulder, then handed it back to Tamayo, warning him against pursuing his interest in photography.

Cikraji e-mailed Pixler about the experience.

"Every U.S. citizen here is afraid," he wrote. "I wish this was a fabrication . . . It is not."

Cikraji decided to see what information he could get from the lawyer. Perhaps Abogados had access to the videotapes. They agreed to meet at the lawyer's office.

Cikraji e-mailed his plans to Pixler: "I know this is crazy but I set up a private meeting tonight with succars ex attorney . . . please understand what I am going to do. I am going to get the video and documents . . . please help me from your side. If this goes down I will do it quickly and surgically . . . please alert DEA or others that this transfer may be made in the next 48 hours."

Pixler quickly responded: "There is a DEA agent on his way to Cancùn from Mérida . . . He is going on other business and can meet you if you will call him. Do not call from your home in case the line is tapped. Either use a cell phone or a pay phone . . . please do not take any dangerous action. We cannot be responsible if you get yourself injured."

At dusk, Cikraji and a friend drove to Abogados' downtown office. The place was dark. No one answered the door. The two men waited for 45 minutes before giving up and heading home.

Cikraji would soon learn the reason for the lawyer's absence.



At around 2 a.m., Cikraji was awakened by gunfire. He tiptoed outside, where gunshots exploded like firecrackers. People were shouting in rapid-fire Spanish. Shards of glass lay scattered about like sparkling jewels. The white sand was splattered with blood.

Cikraji remained in the shadows, unable to see the faces of the men. In the distance, he heard the blare of sirens, then the sound of stampeding feet. Cikraji raced back to his room.

The next morning, staffers rushed about the resort, carrying sheets and towels to clean up the blood. Cikraji watched from the safety of his room. "This is where I went to retire?"

When U.S. authorities heard of the shooting, they sent out a press release, urging Americans to leave the Solymar. Pixler warned Cikraji to extricate himself from the situation. It had become too dangerous.

"We all do not want you to insert yourself any further into this matter," Pixler wrote. "Don't trust any local authorities . . . keep your head down."

Cikraji ignored the warning.

One spring evening, he called up Lydia Cacho, a Mexican journalist writing an exposé on Succar's pedophile ring.

The two met at a coffee shop. Cacho, a stunning brunette with wavy brown hair and piercing eyes, sat at a wrought iron table next to her bodyguard. Since word leaked that she was writing a book about Succar, she'd been receiving death threats.

Cacho revealed that Abogados had approached her about selling the tapes. For $25,000, they were hers.

Cacho rejected the offer; she didn't pay for information. She hadn't heard from Abogados since.

But the news gave Cikraji hope. He arranged another meeting with the lawyer. "You know it would be in the best interest of a lot of people if Succar went to jail in the United States," he told Abogados. "We could really do a job if tapes were in the U.S. authorities' hands."

Abogados remained noncommittal, but left the door open for future negotiations.

For the next month, the two exchanged e-mails. But the talks were like a Mexican dance -- two steps forward, three steps back.

Then Mexican authorities located a hard drive containing hundreds of photos of naked children. Back in the states, Pixler called off Cikraji's negotiations.

Cikraji had the sinking suspicion that this was becoming a Mexican case. The United States, it seemed, wasn't interested in prosecuting Succar on American soil, though American pedophiles had traveled to the Solymar.

More alarming, U.S. officials seemed to know little about the case. Pixler, for instance, was unaware of the explosive videotape played on Mexican television. And though Cikraji had located a former Succar employee, Irma Caamel, who claimed to have arranged for several underage children to be sent to Florida and California, the U.S. government never contacted her after Cikraji passed along the information.

The professor was incensed. The feds knew Succar was running a worldwide pedophile ring -- perhaps even sending his victims to American soil -- but they didn't seem the least bit interested in investigating.



Last year, Lydia Cacho published The Devils of Eden. Her book on Succar made her a celebrity, but also a target.

Cacho implicated powerful officials. One, Jose Kamel Nacif Borge, was a wealthy Mexican textile executive known as "The Denim King." Cacho identified Nacif as Succar's accomplice and protector.

A furious Nacif denied the allegations and sued for defamation. In Mexico, defamation is a criminal offense, which can result in up to four years in prison. And the truth is not a defense.

In December 2005, police barged into Cacho's office. They took her to a prison in Puebla, a city 20 hours from Cancùn. It happened to be Nacif's home base. During the ride, police taunted her with threats of rape. Cacho spent 24 hours in jail before she was freed on bail.

The officers' threats, it turned out, were not bluster. Two months later, a Mexican television station received tapes of phone calls between Nacif and top Mexican officials -- including the governor of Puebla -- discussing plans to have Cacho raped.

In one, the governor of Puebla is heard telling Nacif that "I finished nailing that fucking bitch yesterday. I told her that in Puebla the law is respected . . . I sent her a message; now let's see how she responds."

Nacif responds that "a beautiful bottle of cognac" is on its way as a thank-you present.

When the tapes aired, Mexico's federal government intervened, charging Nacif and other government officials with crimes against the state. But the defamation charges stood.

Over the fall, Cacho, with whom Scene communicated briefly before losing contact, asked Cikraji to testify about all he had seen in Mexico.

In October, Cikraji testified for four hours about his experiences at the Solymar. He identified pictures of the children he'd seen hanging around the resort.

Irma Caamel also testified that she helped arrange for young children to be transported to the United States. A taped conversation between Nacif and Succar was recently aired on Mexican television, corroborating her testimony. In it, Nacif is heard soliciting Succar to "bring little girls to Florida for sex."

On January 3, the Mexican Supreme Court officially cleared Cacho of all charges.



The U.S. didn't bother to wait for Cacho's trial before sending Succar back to Mexico. Last July, U.S. District Judge David Duncan ordered his extradition.

It's hard to tell how much Duncan knew before making his decision, since he declined comment for this story. Prosecutor Reid Pixler is currently in Iraq. A spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office in Arizona said he was unavailable for comment.

In an e-mail sent to Cikraji in March of 2004, Pixler assured the professor that the Department of Justice was working hard on the case. Trying to find out what happened to the children allegedly sent to the States is a "great deal like trying to find a needle in a haystack," Pixler warned.

But the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children doesn't know anything about the case, says spokeswoman Barbara Petito. "Law enforcement might still be investigating it," she suggests. To this day, however, no U.S. agent has ever contacted Caamel, Cikraji alleges.

After Scene repeatedly questioned government officials, the FBI declared two weeks ago that it would launch a probe.

Meanwhile, the Solymar is now run by Succar's younger brother. Residents remain terrified and unable to rent out rooms.

"We have no control over security," says one, who doesn't want her name used for fear of retaliation. "It's pretty intimidating."

Cikraji is too scared to return. He hasn't been back to Mexico since his testimony in October. "I'm not interested in being caught between a bunch of goons," he says. But in his nightmares, he still hears the cries of the kids he couldn't protect.
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=10553&p=103250&hilit=Lydia+Cacho#p103250


biaothanatoi » Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:51 am wrote:MEXICO: Ties Between Elites and Child Sex Rings "Beyond Imagination"
Diego Cevallos
Inter Press Service News Agency

MEXICO CITY, Sep 13 (IPS) - The complicity in Mexico between child sex rings and the political and business elites "goes beyond what we can even imagine," says activist Lydia Cacho, who faces death threats and was even thrown briefly into prison for revealing those ties in a book.

"What we have just seen is only the tip of the iceberg," Cacho told IPS, after the local media aired Tuesday recordings of telephone conversations between two prominent politicians and a hotel owner now in prison, and a wealthy local businessman.

The number of Mexican politicians and businessmen involved in child pornography and sex rings "would shock us if we knew the real extent of the phenomenon," said Cacho.

In one of the illegally taped conversations broadcast Tuesday, which apparently date back to 2004, the governor of the state of Veracruz, Fidel Herrera of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), and Emilio Gamboa, head of the party's bloc in the lower house of Congress, can be heard talking on friendly terms with textile mogul Kamel Nacif.

Nacif, a Mexican of Lebanese origin, who in the obscenity-laced conversation can be heard asking Gamboa to block a gambling bill to be debated by Congress, is suing Cacho for libel.

In her 2004 book "Los demonios del Edén" (The Demons of Eden), Cacho -- who is a journalist and writer as well as the director of a women's shelter in Cancún -- links Nacif with Jean Succar, a Lebanese-born hotel owner who is in prison facing charges of arranging paedophile parties in that Mexican resort town.

In another of the anonymously recorded conservations leaked to the press and broadcast Tuesday, Nacif can be heard talking with Succar.

Succar, under arrest in Mexico since July, after he was extradited from the United States, can be heard asking Nacif for a seven million dollar loan to purchase a hotel in Cancún, to which Nacif responds in the affirmative.

Later, the two exchange information on "the girl from Miami," who they refer to as "putita" (little whore), and who they say they have paid 2,000 dollars. Succar asks Nacif when it would be best to bring the girl to Cancún, and the latter responds that "next week, you son of a b***h, but you bring her to fornicate."

In Cacho's book, Succar is identified as the head of a ring of adults who subjected underage girls to sexual abuse in Cancún, in which Nacif allegedly took part.

Succar was arrested in February 2004 in the United States on child abuse charges and was extradited to Mexico in July, where he also faces charges for money laundering and organised crime.

"Los demonios del Edén" contains the personal accounts of minors who talk about the sexual abuse they suffered at the hands of a ring in which prominent figures were allegedly involved. The youngsters describe how the hotel owner sexually abused them himself, set up a prostitution ring to allow others to abuse them, and photographed them in order to sell the pornographic images on the Internet.

A 2004 study by researcher Elena Azaola, which estimated that some 17,000 children under the age of 18 are victims of the sex trade in Mexico, is also based on interviews with minors who managed to escape, as well as visits to establishments where underage girls and boys are forced to work as prostitutes.

The two PRI politicians, Herrera and Gamboa, denied having any illegal ties with Nacif, and said they did not even know Succar. From their point of view, the airing of the tapped phone conversations was a low political blow aimed at their party.

The PRI, which ruled Mexico from 1929 to 2000, came in third in the Jul. 2 presidential and legislative elections.

Gamboa is one of the lawmakers who have approached Felipe Calderón of the conservative governing National Action Party (PAN) over the last few days, since he was confirmed as president-elect by the electoral court.

Javier González, a leader of the leftist Democratic Revolution Party (PRD) legislators, said the leaked conversations between Nacif and the PRI politicians showed that the political system "is rotten."

The PRD argues that its candidate, Andrés López Obrador, lost the elections to Calderón because of fraud.

Cacho agrees that corruption is rife. "Many businessmen like Nacif have amassed huge fortunes in exchange for dark favours to politicians."

So far, no direct link between politicians or prominent businessmen and child porn or sex rings has been proven. But there are suspicions, which are fuelled by Nacif and his web of contacts.

Cacho, who has been under police protection since last year, when she began to receive death threats, was referred to in earlier leaked conversations, between Nacif and Mario Marín, governor of the state of Puebla, near the capital.

In the tapped conversations, Marín, a member of the PRI, can be heard telling Nacif that "I just gave a bump on the head to that old witch."

The two men also discussed how they had the activist arrested and thrown into a cell with "nutcases and dykes (lesbians)," so that she would be raped -- something that did not occur, because in the prison, "the prisoners themselves and the guards protected me," the writer said in an earlier conversation with IPS.

The tapes, which were sent to the press anonymously and broadcast in February, were apparently recorded in December 2005, after Cacho was thrown into jail for 30 hours, after a grueling 20-hour drive from her home in Cancún to Puebla.

The activist was arrested in connection with the libel suit brought against her by Nacif.

But when the news of her arrest broke, the rights watchdog Amnesty International, the World Organisation Against Torture, the Inter-American Press Association and other international groups raised an outcry, and Cacho was released on bail.

After the scandal triggered by the leaked phone conversations in February, in which the governor of Puebla and Nacif -- who owns factories in that state -- are heard discussing actions to teach Cacho a lesson, the Supreme Court initiated an investigation to determine whether or not Marín had engaged in criminal activity. (END/2006)


semper occultus » Wed Mar 12, 2014 2:44 pm wrote:^ ...jesus f**king wept....what is that all about.... :confused

...I was thinking of this one.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lydia_Cacho

Lydia Cacho

Lydia Cacho Ribeiro (born Mexico City, 12 April 1963[1]) is a Mexican journalist, feminist, and human rights activist. Described by Amnesty International as "perhaps Mexico’s most famous investigative journalist and women’s rights advocate", Cacho's reporting focuses on violence against and sexual abuse of women and children.[2]

In 2004, her book Los Demonios del Edén created a nationwide scandal by alleging that several prominent businessmen had conspired to protect a pedophilia ring. In 2006, a tape emerged of a conversation between businessman Kamel Nacif Borge and Mario Plutarco Marín Torres, governor of Puebla, in which they conspired to have Cacho beaten and raped for her reporting.

Los Demonios del Edén

In 2003, Cacho wrote articles on the sexual abuse of minors for the newspaper Por Esto including a note on a girl abused by a local hotel owner, Jean Succar Kuri.[4][5] Feeling that the local police had failed to act on the girl's complaint, the following year, Cacho published the book Los Demonios del Edén ("Demons of Eden") in which she accuses Kuri of being involved in a ring of child pornography and prostitution, based on official statements from his alleged victims and even a video of him (filmed with hidden camera). The book also mentions important politicians as Emilio Gamboa Patrón and Miguel Ángel Yunes as involved, and accuses Kamel Nacif Borge, a Puebla businessman, of protecting Succar Kuri.[3][4]

After the book's release, Cacho was arrested in Cancún by Puebla police and driven back to Puebla, 900 miles away.[3] Cacho has stated that the arresting officers verbally abused her and hinted there was a plan to rape her.[1] She was then imprisoned for a short time on defamation charges before being released on bail.[3]

On 14 February 2006, several telephone conversations between Nacif Borge and Mario Marín, governor of the state of Puebla, were revealed by the Mexico City daily La Jornada, creating a media frenzy. In these conversations, before Cacho's arrest, Marín and Nacif Borge discussed putting Cacho in jail as a favour, and having her beaten and abused while in jail to silence her.[6][7] The recording sparked widespread calls for Marín to be impeached.[3]

Cacho took the case of her arrest to the Supreme Court, becoming the first woman in Mexico's history to testify there.[2] On 29 November 2007, the Court ruled 6 to 4 that Marín had no case to answer in Cacho's arrest, jailing and harassment, a case that the New York Times described as "a setback for journalistic freedom in Mexico".[3] The United Nations Human Rights Council advised her to leave the country, recommended that she seek political asylum in another country, and offered her legal assistance and assistance in gaining access to international courts.[8] While being held, Cacho was granted the Premio Francisco Ojeda al Valor Periodístico (Francisco Ojeda Award for Journalistic Courage).[9]

In May 2008, a few days before she was scheduled to testify at Kuri's trial, Cacho was almost killed when the lugnuts on one of her car's wheels were loosened.[2]


cptmarginal » Wed Nov 25, 2015 8:17 pm wrote:This could've fit just as easily into the War on Drugs, Money Laundry and Plan (Destroy) Mexico thread.

Because it's always about the drug trade at some level, isn't it?

The next day, negotiations being successfully concluded, the Gulfstream took off for Colombia. Nothing unusual was noticed. The plane was on a well-worn path. The airport in Cancun was the busiest drug port in Mexico.

After loading its cargo of cocaine the following day, the Gulfstream took off from the international airport just outside Medellin, in Rio Negro Colombia, bound once more for the exclusive Mexican Caribbean resort of Cancun, in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo.


(I'd personally have put the term femicide in quotation marks if it was going to be in the title of the article but that hardly matters, doesn't it? I'm paying attention.)

Series of femicides cast a dark shadow over Mexico's 'sunshine state'

Horrific murders of Mexican women in region that includes Cancun and Playa del Carmen has community demanding justice

Image

A march in Cancun by several thousand people protesting the murder of women in November.

Wednesday 25 November 2015 07.30 EST

Quintana Roo is Mexico’s sunshine state, a booming tourists’ playground which draws record numbers of holiday-makers to its golden beaches, coral reefs, Mayan ruins and all-inclusive package deals.

But in recent weeks, the Caribbean region has been badly shaken by a string of brutal murders of women – which authorities have seemed keen to downplay.

Within the space of three weeks, seven women have been murdered, bringing the total to 18 so far this year. At least two of the victims were strangled, and several had been sexually assaulted before their bodies were dumped in public places. All the women were Mexican.

This latest surge in murders has renewed tensions between activists against gender violence, and government officials who accuse them of trying to derail tourism and economic progress.

Celina Izquierdo Sánchez, from the Quintana Roo Observatory of Social and Gender Violence, said that a “time bomb” of violence against women had exploded because state officials played down the scale of the problem. “Nothing was done due to the false belief that recognising and tackling gender violence would affect tourism,” she said. “Justice will not reduce tourism.”

Situated on the lush tropical Yucatan peninsula, Quintana Roo is the jewel in the crown of Mexico’s flourishing tourism industry. A record 10 million holidaymakers and four million cruise ship passengers visited the state in 2014, accounting for almost 30% of tourists to the country, according to the Tourism Board (Sedetur).

This year is looking even stronger, with millions of North Americans and Europeans expected in Cancun and Playa del Carmen during the winter months.

But in an attempt to protect its idyllic image, authorities have long preferred to minimize the state’s problems.

In 2005, investigative reporter Lydia Cacho exposed the involvement of high profile businessmen and politicians in a child pornography and prostitution ring operating in Cancun. She was arrested for defamation, tortured and threatened with rape in what was later revealed to be a plot to silence her.

“I’ve been systematically accused by the governor and his news outlets of being ‘an enemy of the state’ because I’ve demonstrated institutional weaknesses, high levels of impunity, corruption and violence – including gender-based violence, the increase in torture and use of the justice system as a punishment tool against political enemies,” Cacho recently wrote.

Quintana Roo still has one of the highest rates of human trafficking in Mexico, according to UN’s World Tourism Organization. The state law against trafficking remains stuck in Congress due to a party political deadlock.

Quintana Roo also has the highest level of reported sexual violence in the country. It has no DNA lab and only one women’s refuge.

This latest grisly wave of gender violence began on 18 October when the naked body of Rebeca Rivera Neri, 24, was found dumped in Cancun. Originally from the state of Veracruz, Rivera had been strangled and badly beaten.

The next victim was tourism undergraduate student María Carrasco Castilla, 19, who was raped, murdered and abandoned at a vacant lot.

Her murder drove thousands onto the streets of Cancun’s upmarket hotel district to demand the declaration of a ‘gender alert’ – an emergency mechanism introduced into law in 2007 following a surge of hate crimes against women in the border town of Ciudad Juarez. But just hours after the protest, the body of another murdered woman was found in the city.

The state governor Roberto Borge Angulo, who was attending a tourism convention in London at the time, issued a statement in which he claimed the murders were all cases of family violence.


Previous threads on Lydia Cacho:

Key Evidence Blocked in Mexican Child Sex Ring Trial

Writer Who Exposed Child Sex Ring Fears the Worst

Mexican pedophile ring sends children to Fla

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