Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby Iamwhomiam » Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:35 pm

That's when the right was pushing the War Hawk Hillary meme, last July.

But Newsweek's goin' down fast. After a "batshit crazy" meeting the other day, their staff is bailing.

Chronologically,

Staffers: ‘Batsh*t Crazy’ Newsweek Meeting Made Staffers Thank Church, Hold Hands

https://www.thedailybeast.com/staffers-batsht-crazy-newsweek-meeting-made-staffers-thank-church-hold-hands

From Expensing Yachts to Chasing The Onion: I Watched the Newsweekly Die From the Inside

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/02/08/from-expensing-a-yacht-to-chasing-the-onion-i-watched-newsweek-die-from-the-inside-216948

The Death of Newsweek

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2018/02/memorializing-newsweek/552647/
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:56 pm

I was told over and over again here by someone that if Clinton was elected the U.S. would be going to war with Russia.

oh and that opinion was not just a mere reply to me.....it was screamed at me along with vicious personal attacks

good thing she wasn't elected
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby Elvis » Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:14 am

Hillary Clinton is the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful human being I've ever known in my life.
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby 82_28 » Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:26 am

Guys. I truly hate to say it. But this shit is for real. It is so fake that it is real it is so real it is fake. No matter who you are there are no "smart moves" from this point on. I think it will only be the residual fumes of giving a fuck about the Constitution at this point. Except it has all been funneled into the 2nd amendment. The one amendment a sane society should not need. Sane people say fuck the guns. I do. I do not care how much I might "need" one under the falsest and base pretenses.

Everything is in place. All it takes now is a flip of the switch. America has become an autocracy at least finally in appearance. That was most important. Dump ain't in charge. He just has to mouth shit that sounds like he is circumspect while also glaringly leaving out the obvious. The office of the president in 2018 clearly has too much power period.

We assume shit is going to correct itself at the "midterms". Somehow, I do not think so. Americans, there is basically nothing we can trust about this country any longer. Those days are gone.

Like I wrote in some thread long ago about this shit on Russia. While being neither right nor wrong, it will become a thing and lend itself to history no matter how we felt about it a year ago or so. No matter how true or false. It passes the inclusion in history book test.

I do not think any US president will ever be trusted again by anyone. But I do think that within 20 years the US will remake itself into what we can now call a corporate controlled paradise. The right has completely unplugged their following from any kind of verifiable timeline due to lack of interest.

In other words. Yes, we are dealing with evil.
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby seemslikeadream » Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:57 am

The Club That Wants Russia To Take Over The World
Image
Natasha Bluth7 Feb 2018

A small group of intellectuals are working on a blueprint for a new Russian empire

Last fall, a prominent right-wing Russian newspaper called “Zavtra” published a fictional story about an underground movement supposedly conspiring to get Vladimir Putin elected as Germany’s next chancellor. It was just a few days before the country went to the polls for parliamentary elections, with their real chancellor, Angela Merkel, facing unprecedented threats from the radical right as she bid for her fourth term.

The inspiration for Zavtra’s piece seems to have come from a report on a Swedish right-wing site, which claimed that posters had appeared in the German capital, Berlin, with the slogan “Vote Putin For Chancellor.” But upon closer examination, it was clear that the photo used in the report had been doctored — and the posters themselves may not even have physically existed.

It looked like a textbook case of online misinformation — an attempt to spread a contentious claim that could be easily exposed as fake, but which nonetheless stirred debate, creating the impression it might be true simply because it had been published.

That the story was in Zavtra gave it extra weight, because the newspaper’s editor-in-chief, Alexander Prokhanov, is also head of an increasingly influential ultranationalist think tank. Known as the Izborsky Club, it is a self-described “intellectual circle” of philosophers, journalists, business-people and Orthodox priests, dedicated to promoting Russian power.

They call themselves “Izborists” and claim to seek a more “just” world order, but with clear imperial ambitions to put Russia at its center. And since Prokhanov created the club six years ago, he and its members have been working hard to try to make their ideas a cornerstone of Kremlin policy.

Named after the town in western Russia where it was conceived, the club advocates Eurasianism, expanding Moscow’s control and influence over a region encompassing the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and parts of Asia. The resulting totalitarian, Russian-led Eurasian Empire would eventually overthrow the West and the democratic values it stands for. In order to achieve this, the club also calls for Stalin-style industrialization policies, converting the Eurasian Economic Union into an autarky, and merging the government with the Russian Orthodox Church.

The Izborists don’t limit themselves to Zavtra, but also make full use of the openness of the internet and a host of other supportive sites to get their message out. They make regular appearances on television and at conferences too. The club is arguably the first successful initiative to bring all the competing factions of Russia’s far right, and their ideas, under one umbrella.

Triumph in Crimea

In June 2014, a delegation of more than two dozen Izborists gathered at the Livadia Palace on the coast of the Crimean peninsula. The visitors, dressed in pastels and casual business attire, trailed behind Prokhanov as they toured what was once the summer retreat of Russia’s tsars. Later, the club members would kneel to kiss Crimean soil and tour one of the battleships of Russia’s Black Sea fleet.

A World War II army tank on the grounds was a reminder that this was not just a former imperial vacation spot, but also the setting for the 1945 Yalta Conference, where Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt divvied up the postwar world. In the eyes of the Izborists, it was a moment that put a block on Russia’s rightful global ambitions.

But this time, they were here to celebrate Russian power. A few months earlier, the Kremlin’s forces had successfully annexed the peninsula. Clasping hands and raising their arms to the sky, the jubilant Izborists posed for a photo framed by the white granite palace. Sixty years after Khrushchev gifted Crimea to Ukraine, Vladimir Putin had brought it back — in their view — to its rightful owner, Russia.

Among the Izborists celebrating was Nikolai Starikov, a writer and the co-chairman of the conservative, pro-Orthodox Great Fatherland Party. Crimea’s annexation, he told Russian reporters, was “the starting point of a certain development of events, not only in Russia, but in the world.” It looked like the start of a new era for Prokhanov and his followers too.

The resulting totalitarian, Russian-led Eurasian Empire would eventually overthrow the West and the democratic values it stands for.
The founder of the Izborsky Club has followed an interesting trajectory. He first made his name as a publisher, during Soviet times. After the fall of the USSR, Prokhanov started a magazine aimed at the far right. He then started to collaborate with the right-wing philosopher and strategist Alexander Dugin, a man regarded as one of the torchbearers of extreme Russian nationalism.

Now the most famous of the Izborists, Dugin has had an even more varied career, advising politicians and serving in high-level academic posts, while also helping to spawn some of the ultra-conservative clubs and institutions from which the Izborsky Club sprang. He is a prolific writer, with his own YouTube channel.

Just how much influence he has on Russia’s foreign and domestic policy is debatable. Certainly, the Western media have sometimes overplayed his significance, and he has been cold-shouldered at times by the Russian government. Nonetheless, he still has a voice that gets listened to. His textbook “The Fundamentals of Geopolitics” remains a staple of the curriculum in many higher education institutions in former Soviet countries. And taking back Crimea had long been a key feature of Dugin’s master plan, a necessary first step to give Russia better maritime access to the European continent.

That’s not the only way in which the Izborsky Club appears to be an intellectual engine room for Vladimir Putin’s Kremlin. Its members are just as concerned about the threat of “color revolution” in Russia, following the various uprisings that have toppled governments in former Soviet states over the past 15 years. The Izborists also strongly back Putin’s initiative to create the Eurasian Economic Union and turn it into a rival to the European Union. And Russian efforts to interfere with the U.S. presidential election similarly align with their goals.

They also have a direct line into the Kremlin. One of its members, Sergey Glazyev, is currently an adviser to Putin, while others have held past government positions, or have close relations with the Russian leader. Bishop Tikhon, one of the Orthodox priests in the club, is known as Putin’s personal confessor.

Yet for all their establishment links, the Izborists have also shown a willingness to antagonize some of their natural supporters. In 2015, Prokhanov provoked the ire of priests in the southern city of Saratov by christening an icon depicting Stalin surrounded by Russian wartime generals and crowned by four saints and the Virgin Mary and child. The local bishop condemned the gesture as a “gross distortion of religious and patriotic feelings,” urging church bodies and other institutions not to cooperate with the Izborists and Prokhanov personally.

“The state is actually quite happy with this [club]. Once you have this collection of barking far-right people, it makes you look centrist.” Mark Galeotti, historian
That same year, the club joined with other nationalist groups in criticizing Putin for withdrawing support for the so-called “New Russia” project — an imagined confederation of states in southeastern Ukraine, where armed conflict broke out in 2014. It had suited the Kremlin to support the concept at the peak of the fighting. A year later, the government’s priorities had changed, and the Izborists found themselves out of step, and off air on state-controlled media — a typical Russian government tactic for exploit and controlling nationalist groups.

But that was hardly the end of the Izborsky Club. It is far too useful to the Kremlin for that, providing a source of ideas that it can borrow from when “convenient,” says Mark Galeotti, a historian who specializes in Russia. Prokhanov and other Izborist members declined all requests for comment.

The club also serves as a conservative threshold in Russian politics, closing down any voices who advocate a more liberal approach, or getting closer to the West. This works the other way too, allowing the Kremlin to keep its distance, labelling them as too extreme when necessary. “The state is actually quite happy with this [club],” says Galeotti. “Once you have this collection of barking far-right people…it makes you look centrist.”

Nonetheless, in disseminating extremist views through the media and their public appearances, the club’s members still have an effect, moving politics rightwards. And they are busy on other fronts, trying to build international alliances with other right-wing forces.

Germany has been a particular target, where Prokhanov and Dugin have been building ties with publisher Jürgen Elsässer. Elsässer was once an extreme leftist who opposed German reunification. Today, he runs the ultraconservative “Compact” magazine, which holds that there has long been a Eurasian alliance between Germany and Russia. He has taken Russia’s side in the conflict in Ukraine and has close ties with Germany’s new far-right party, Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), which won more than 90 seats in last year’s elections.

The Kremlin may have had a hand in the AfD’s breakthrough, via propaganda broadcasts targeted at German citizens of Russian descent and efforts to stir up divisions around issues like migrants and refugees. Other Russian organizations, such as the International Parliamentary Forum, are also complementing Izborist initiatives to build ties with pro-Kremlin politicians elsewhere in Europe.

But while there are similarities in outlook, there are differences too between the Izborists and other far-right groupings outside Russia. Germany’s AfD for instance, actively promotes Islamophobic attitudes against all Muslims. Russian Eurasianists, on the other hand, generally support Muslims who take an anti-American stance.

These are small details though for a group as ambitious as the Izborsky club. Political groups like this prosper by taking multiple bets simultaneously. And for now the club seems to be thriving, announcing a new branch in St. Petersburg last year. This was its 22nd regional office, including its headquarters near the Kremlin in central Moscow. It is a sign that the Izborsky Club’s time has come, according to Alexander Dugin.

“The people are Izborists,” he said in a video interview. “Our country is Izborist.”

Illustration by Zura Mchedlishvili.

Natasha Bluth is a journalist covering human rights issues and the politics of identity in the former Soviet Union.
https://codastory.com/disinformation-cr ... -the-world


DrEvil » Mon Nov 21, 2016 8:36 pm wrote:
Playtime is over

By Charlie Stross

So I've had a week now for the outcome of last Tuesday's US election to sink in, and I've been doing some thinking and some research, and my conclusion is that either I'm wearing a tinfoil hat or things are much, much worse than most people imagine.

Nearly four years ago I wrote about the Beige Dictatorship, and predicted:

Overall, the nature of the problem seems to be that our representative democratic institutions have been captured by meta-institutions that implement the iron law of oligarchy by systematically reducing the risk of change. They have done so by converging on a common set of policies that do not serve the public interest, but minimize the risk of the parties losing the corporate funding they require in order to achieve re-election. And in so doing, they have broken the "peaceful succession when enough people get pissed off" mechanism that prevents revolutions. If we're lucky, emergent radical parties will break the gridlock (here in the UK that would be the SNP in Scotland, possibly UKIP in England: in the USA it might be the new party that emerges if the rupture between the Republican realists like Karl Rove and the Tea Party radicals finally goes nuclear), but within a political generation (two election terms) it'll be back to oligarchy as usual.

Well, I was optimistic. The tea party radicals have gone nuclear, but I wasn't counting on a neo-Nazi running the White House, or on the Kremlin stepping in ...

Let me explain.

A few years ago, wandering around the net, I stumbled on a page titled "Why Japan lost the Second World War". (Sorry, I can't find the URL.) It held two photographs. The first was a map of the Pacific Theater used by the Japanese General Staff. It extended from Sakhalin in the north to Australia in the south, from what we now call Bangladesh in the west, to Hawaii in the east. The second photograph was the map of the war in the White House. A Mercator projection showing the entire planet. And the juxtaposition explained in one striking visual exactly why the Japanese military adventure against the United States was doomed from the outset: they weren't even aware of the true size of the battleground.

I'd like you to imagine what it must have been like to be a Japanese staff officer. Because that's where we're standing today. We think we're fighting local battles against Brexit or Trumpism. But in actuality, they're local fronts in a global war. And we're losing because we can barely understand how big the conflict is.

(NB: By "we", I mean folks who think that the Age of Enlightenment, the end of monarchism, and the evolution of Liberalism are good things. If you disagree with this, then kindly hold your breath until your head explodes. (And don't bother commenting below: I'll delete and ban you on sight.))

The logjam created by the Beige Dictatorship was global, throughout the western democracies; and now it has broken. But it didn't break by accident, and the consequences could be very bad indeed.

What happened last week is not just about America. It was one move—a very significant one, bishop-takes-queen maybe—in a long-drawn-out geopolitical chess game. It's being fought around the world: Brexit was one move, the election and massacres of Dutarte in the Philippines were another, the post-coup crackdown in Turkey is a third. The possible election of Marine Le Pen (a no-shit out-of-the-closet fascist) as President of France next year is more of this stuff. The eldritch knot of connections between Turkey and Saudi Arabia and Da'esh in the wreckage of Syria is icing on top. It's happening all over and I no longer think this is a coincidence.

Part of it is about the geopolitics of climate change (and mass migration and water wars). Part of it is about the jarring transition from an oil-based economy (opposed by the factions who sell oil and sponsor denial climate change, from Exxon-Mobil to the Kremlin) to a carbon-neutral one.

Part of it is the hellbrew of racism and resentment stirred up by loss of relative advantage, by the stagnation of wages in the west and the perception that other people somewhere else are stealing all the money—Chinese factories, Wall Street bankers, the faceless Other. (17M people in the UK have less than £100 in savings; by a weird coincidence, the number of people who voted for Brexit was around 17M. People who are impoverished become desperate and angry and have little investment in the status quo—a fancy way of saying they've got nothing to lose.)

But another big part of the picture I'm trying to draw is Russia's long-drawn out revenge for the wild ride of misrule the neoconservatives inflicted on the former USSR in the 1990s.

Stripped of communism, the old guard didn't take their asset-stripping by neoliberals during the Clinton years lying down; they no more morphed into whitebread Americans than the Iraqis did during the occupation. They developed a reactionary playbook; a fellow called Alexander Dugin wrote The Foundations of Geopolitics, and it's been a set text in the Russian staff college for the past two decades. A text that proposes a broad geopolitical program for slavic (Russian) dominance over Asia, which is to be won by waging a global ideological war against people like us. "In principle, Eurasia and our space, the heartland Russia, remain the staging area of a new anti-bourgeois, anti-American revolution. ... The new Eurasian empire will be constructed on the fundamental principle of the common enemy: the rejection of Atlanticism, strategic control of the USA, and the refusal to allow liberal values to dominate us. This common civilizational impulse will be the basis of a political and strategic union."

I don't want to sound like a warmed-over cold warrior or a swivel-eyed conspiracy theorist. However, the authoritarian faction currently ascendent in Putin's Russia seem to be running their country by this book. Their leaders remember how the KGB (newly reformed last month) handled black propaganda and disinformation, and they have people who know how new media work and who are updating the old time Moscow rules for a new century. Trump's Russian connections aren't an accident—they may be the most important thing about him, and Russia's sponsorship of extreme right neo-fascist movements throughout Europe is an alarming part of the picture. China isn't helping, either: they're backing authoritarian regimes wherever they seem useful, for the same reason the US State Department under Henry Kissinger backed fascists throughout central and south America in the 1970s—it took a generation to fix the damage from Operation Condor, and that was local (at least, confined to a single continent).

Trying to defeat this kind of attack through grass-roots action at local level ... well, it's not useless, it's brave and it's good, but it's also Quixotic. With hindsight, the period from December 26th, 1991 to September 11th, 2001, wasn't the end of history; it was the Weimar Republic repeating itself, and now we're in the dirty thirties. It's going to take more than local action if we're to climb out of the mass grave the fascists have been digging for us these past decades. It's going to take international solidarity and a coherent global movement and policies and structures I can barely envisage if we're going to rebuild the framework of shared progressive values that have been so fatally undermined.

We haven't lost yet.

But if we focus too narrowly on the local context, we will lose, because there is a de facto global fascist international at work, they've got a game plan, they're quite capable of applying the methods of Operation Condor on a global scale, and if we don't work out how to push back globally fast there will be nobody to remember our graves.

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-st ... -over.html

About the Foundations of Geopolitics by Alexander Dugin (via wikipedia, my bold):

Germany should be offered the de facto political dominance over most Protestant and Catholic states located within Central and Eastern Europe. Kaliningrad oblast could be given back to Germany. The book uses the term a "Moscow-Berlin axis".[1]
France should be encouraged to form a "Franco-German bloc" with Germany. Both countries have a "firm anti-Atlanticist tradition".[1]
United Kingdom should be cut off from Europe.[1]
Finland should be absorbed into Russia. Southern Finland will be combined with the Republic of Karelia and northern Finland will be "donated to Murmansk Oblast".[1]
Estonia should be given to Germany's sphere of influence.[1]
Latvia and Lithuania should be given a "special status" in the Eurasian-Russian sphere.[1]
Poland should be granted a "special status" in the Eurasian sphere.[1]
Romania, Macedonia, "Serbian Bosnia" and Greece – "orthodox collectivist East" – will unite with the "Moscow the Third Rome" and reject the "rational-individualistic West".[1]
Ukraine should be annexed by Russia because "“Ukraine as a state has no geopolitical meaning, no particular cultural import or universal significance, no geographic uniqueness, no ethnic exclusiveness, its certain territorial ambitions represents an enormous danger for all of Eurasia and, without resolving the Ukrainian problem, it is in general senseless to speak about continental politics". Ukraine should not be allowed to remain independent, unless it is cordon sanitaire, which would be inadmissible.[1]

In the Middle East and Central Asia:

The book stresses the "continental Russian-Islamic alliance" which lies "at the foundation of anti-Atlanticist strategy". The alliance is based on the "traditional character of Russian and Islamic civilization".
Iran is a key ally. The book uses the term "Moscow-Tehran axis".[1]
Armenia has a special role and will serve as a "strategic base" and it is necessary to create "the [subsidiary] axis Moscow-Erevan-Teheran". Armenians "are an Aryan people … [like] the Iranians and the Kurds".[1]
Azerbaijan could be "split up" or given to Iran.[1]
Georgia should be dismembered. Abkhazia and "United Ossetia" (which includes Georgia's South Ossetia) will be incorporated into Russia. Georgia's independent policies are unacceptable.[1]
Russia needs to create "geopolitical shocks" within Turkey. These can be achieved by employing Kurds, Armenians and other minorities.[1]
The book regards the Caucasus as a Russian territory, including "the eastern and northern shores of the Caspian (the territories of Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan)" and Central Asia (mentioning Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kirghistan and Tajikistan).[1]

In Asia:

China, which represents a danger to Russia, "must, to the maximum degree possible, be dismantled". Dugin suggests that Russia start by taking Tibet-Xinjiang-Mongolia-Manchuria as a security belt.[2] Russia should offer China help "in a southern direction – Indochina (except Vietnam), the Philippines, Indonesia, Australia" as geopolitical compensatation.[1]
Russia should manipulate Japanese politics by offering the Kuril Islands to Japan and provoking anti-Americanism.[1]
Mongolia should be absorbed into Eurasia-Russia.[1]

The book emphasizes that Russia must spread Anti-Americanism everywhere: "the main 'scapegoat' will be precisely the U.S."

In the United States:

Russia should use its special forces within the borders of the United States to fuel instability and separatism. For instance, provoke "Afro-American racists". Russia should "introduce geopolitical disorder into internal American activity, encouraging all kinds of separatism and ethnic, social and racial conflicts, actively supporting all dissident movements – extremist, racist, and sectarian groups, thus destabilizing internal political processes in the U.S. It would also make sense simultaneously to support isolationist tendencies in American politics."[1]

The Eurasian Project could be expanded to South and Central America.[1]
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby Rory » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:36 pm

This reads like Tom Clancy esque lunacy. Completely untethered from reality.

But, par for the course in these delusional times. Fake newz reigns supreme.
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby seemslikeadream » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:40 pm

Fake newz reigns supreme


so true

The inspiration for Zavtra’s piece seems to have come from a report on a Swedish right-wing site, which claimed that posters had appeared in the German capital, Berlin, with the slogan “Vote Putin For Chancellor.” But upon closer examination, it was clear that the photo used in the report had been doctored — and the posters themselves may not even have physically existed.

It looked like a textbook case of online misinformation — an attempt to spread a contentious claim that could be easily exposed as fake, but which nonetheless stirred debate, creating the impression it might be true simply because it had been published.

That the story was in Zavtra gave it extra weight, because the newspaper’s editor-in-chief, Alexander Prokhanov, is also head of an increasingly influential ultranationalist think tank. Known as the Izborsky Club, it is a self-described “intellectual circle” of philosophers, journalists, business-people and Orthodox priests, dedicated to promoting Russian power.
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby dada » Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:37 pm

"they have people who know how new media work"

They must be very smart. Mutant-geniuses of the cutting edge. How do this new media work?
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby seemslikeadream » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:19 pm

Image


Russian 'hacker' arrested in Bangkok
Thai police arresting Russian national Sergey Medvedev.

PUBLISHEDFEB 10, 2018, 5:00 AM SGT

BANGKOK • A Russian man accused of co-running an international cybercrime network shuttered in a US-led crackdown this week has been arrested in Bangkok and will face extradition, Thai police said yesterday.

Mr Sergey Medvedev, 31, is accused of co-founding the "Infraud Organisation," an online network that stole and sold credit card and other personal identity data, causing US$530 million (S$705 million) in losses, the US authorities said.

On Wednesday, the US Department of Justice indicted 36 people on charges of racketeering conspiracy and other crimes for their roles in the crime syndicate. Thirteen defendants hailing from around the globe were arrested in the United States and six other countries - Australia, Britain, France, Italy, Kosovo and Serbia.


Mr Medvedev was not listed as one of the 36 suspects charged but was described in the indictment as co-administrator of Infraud with its Ukraine founder Svyatoslav Bondarenko, who remains at large.

Police armed with automatic weapons swooped on his Bangkok condo on Feb 2, making the arrest before US officials indicted other alleged members of the ring.

"(Medvedev) is now being detained at Bangkok Remand Prison waiting for US authorities to take him for prosecution in the US," said police officer Nuthapon Rattanamongkolsak from the Crime Suppression Division.

The US Embassy in Bangkok declined comment.

The Russian national frequently travelled in and out of Thailand over the past six years on tourist visas, Mr Nuthapon said, adding that he expected Mr Medvedev to be extradited within the month.

Infraud was founded in Ukraine in 2010 and sold itself on the slogan "In Fraud We Trust". It became the "premier destination" on the Web for buying goods with counterfeit or stolen credit card information, according to the US authorities.

The organisation, which had 10,901 approved "members" by 2017, also provided an "escrow" service for transactions in cryptocurrencies including bitcoin.
http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asi ... in-bangkok
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby Morty » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:05 pm

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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby American Dream » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:44 pm

PUTIN TEST II: VLADIMIR SAVICH


But Putin will bail out Greece. He’s a hero!

Today’s Greece, despite a change of political party, is a postmodernist society. And I want to I want to say to the Greeks, it’s better to eat your souvlaki than to hope for assistance from Huylo.

Recently Demis Roussos died and I want to finish with words from his song:

Ever and ever, forever and ever you’ll be the one
That shines in me like the morning sun.
Ever and ever, forever and ever you’ll be my spring,
My rainbow’s end and the song I sing.



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http://queenmobs.com/2015/02/putin-test ... ir-savich/
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby PufPuf93 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:27 pm

Elvis » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:16 pm wrote:
Burnt Hill » Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:55 pm wrote:
Elvis wrote:This is getting nuts.

I get it but this is from last year.
Times moving way too fast.


Okay, change that to: "This is nuts."

It's mainly just another example of stirring hysteria against the designated villian. Thankfully the American people are to smart to fall for it. Right? Right?

:tongout


Ironic that there is so much political and media concern about Russian hacking when more obviously domestic voter hacking has occurred in the USA by various murky never precuisely identified much less punished parties to the degree that a major national politician cannot achieve office that is not in thrall of wealth, corporate, and military.

For sure Putin and Russian prefer that the USA struggle in the global tide of power and influence but probably the actors that favor Russia are businesses and opportunists all the way down with no Russian State actor direct causal.

Russia Russia Russia

Anymore one cannot point out that the Emperor and Emperor wannabe(s) and the entire political structure have asses showing in the good ole USofA else one be labeled a Russia apologist.
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby Burnt Hill » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:40 pm

PufPuf93 wrote:Ironic that there is so much political and media concern about Russian hacking when more obviously domestic voter hacking has occurred in the USA by various murky never precuisely identified much less punished parties to the degree that a major national politician cannot achieve office that is not in thrall of wealth, corporate, and military.


Maybe it is just that simple. We don't care until its an external force messing with us.
We have accepted an election being stolen right before our eyes.
We already know, have known there are incredible issues with our voting system security.
We watched the Dems manipulate the primary system legally.
Maybe pointing the finger at Putin first will allow us to see our reflection in his eyes.
And for all the so called hysteria, what has been done about it?
We have not seen hysteria, not yet.

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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby mentalgongfu2 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:53 pm

Burnt Hill wrote:
PufPuf93 wrote:Ironic that there is so much political and media concern about Russian hacking when more obviously domestic voter hacking has occurred in the USA by various murky never precuisely identified much less punished parties to the degree that a major national politician cannot achieve office that is not in thrall of wealth, corporate, and military.


Maybe it is just that simple. We don't care until its an external force messing with us.
We have accepted an election being stolen right before our eyes.
We already know, have known there are incredible issues with our voting system security.
We watched the Dems manipulate the primary system legally.
Maybe pointing the finger at Putin first will allow us to see our reflection in his eyes.
And for all the so called hysteria, what has been done about it?
We have not seen hysteria, not yet.

Image


There's some Truth there.

We saw the 2000 Election decided by a Supreme Court, which was arguably bought off by Walt Disney money.

That travesty became the excuse (read: Justification) for the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) that allowed a handful of companies with disturbing connections to take control of the market of voting machines nationwide, and also foisted easily-manipulated and impossible to audit electronic voting on every precinct in America. A handful of states now require paper ballots (mine among them), but HAVA effectively killed several companies that provided voting machines, allowed the market to be monopolized, and made it oh so much easier to hack the vote. I wrote about all this as it happened locally IRL, but me and Rachel at the Clinton Herald seemed to be the only ones who cared, readers and editors included.
"When I'm done ranting about elite power that rules the planet under a totalitarian government that uses the media in order to keep people stupid, my throat gets parched. That's why I drink Orange Drink!"
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Re: Why Do People Apologize For Russia?

Postby PufPuf93 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:43 pm

Often the most easily accessed and effective path is to deal with own issues and fix those issues, then one is not as redisposed nor subject to outside mischief.

There is virtue and strength in keeping one's own home in good order.

These concepts well fit the mess that is the USA. If we should want to be a leader and light unto the world, the best strategy is to improve ourselves. Trump is a symptom of the much that has gone wrong.
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