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Re: synchronicity

Postby Jeff » Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:29 pm

professorpan wrote:Truly weird.


Vallee's Associative Universe strikes again:


Of course, given the millions, if not billions, of variables that interact throughout the course of the day, it’s impossible for there not to be the occasional coincidences, which are no more than that. But every once in a while some whopper drops on your head that gives you doubts. When a highly unlikely textual coincidence occurred to astrophysicist Jacques Vallee during a Los Angeles cab ride, he was inspired to consider the nature of chance. Pondering the equivalence of energy and information, Vallee decided “we live in the associative universe of the software scientist rather than the sequential universe of the space-time physicist.” Which means our focus on a given idea or emotion may be like performing a cosmic file request.

The library angel and related phenomenon suggest something like a Google-search aspect to existence, or, to use a different metaphor, that the universe occasionally behaves the way an author does with the characters in his or her novel.
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Yahoo/AT&T foreshadow McCain's staff resignation.

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Tue Jul 10, 2007 3:17 pm

Sunday 7/8/07: Yahoo's "10 popular searches" lists "#4--resignation letters." ? Hunh!?
Tuesday 7/10/07: McCain's campaign staff resigns.

If you think that Americans by the millions were searching up "resignation letters" online a few days before it is announced that McCain's campaign staff RESIGNED, than I'd say you are a hard-core coincidentalist who will never see subliminal framing psy-ops.

Whether it "works" or not, the device of subliminal framing of keywords before the release of hostile information is done all the time, just like-
1/29/05>Fox TV attacks Ward Churchill for "little Eichmanns" comment on 9/12/01
2/4/05>CIA hired Eichmanns's staff documents released to National Security Archive.

I've said that the front page of America's largest internet provider, AT&T/Yahoo, is being managed with psy-ops, word and theme juxtaposition, diversions, etc.
http://rigorousintuition.ca/board/viewtopic.php?t=12263

I noticed that on 7/8/07 Yahoo's featured news box included a story about the Afghan minister responsible for stopping opium growing had resigned. Bad news.

Weirdly, the #4 item in the box of 'popular Yahoo searches' was "resignation letters."
Was Amurrica on-hook-line-and-sinker really all busily searching up resignation letters instead of the latest stone cast at Paris Hilton? I don't think so. If fact, I'm POSITIVE that was not happening despite Yahoo's telling us it was.

I noted it as perhaps a way to mitigate the anti-opium Afghan minister's resignation with
"Gosh, people resign all the time. No big whoop." Hmm...

Well, that was just the excuse, not the target hostile information because....
Citizen 'Baghdad is safe' McCain's campaign staff just ALL RESIGNED!
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070710/ap_on_el_pr/mccain_campaign
McCain campaign suffers key shakeups

And that is 'hostile information' deserving counterpropaganda when that GOP water-carrier and Vietnam Vet is being used as a credibility prop for the discredited military-industrial GOP and is being used as a way to co-opt another four-to-eight years worth of non-mutiny from the Pentagon.

Would CIA (or whatever alphabet agency asset) use word tricks in the service of 'national will?' Well, of course.

Propaganda and psy-ops devices are REAL and COMMON.
My mental health is just fine, thank you, I've studied perception management more than the nay-sayers here. A good sixty years worth.

I'm right about subliminal framing being used to foreshadow hostile information or do post-event damage control. And keywords are the 'mind bombs' used to sabotage a topic just the way scuba divers used limpet mines during Operation Vulcan, to refer back to my original post about an international incident getting morphed into 'The Incredible Mr. Limpet.'

Why would national psy-ops be used in the case of amusement park accidents and Disney?
http://rigorousintuition.ca/board/viewtopic.php?t=12263

Because Disney has long been a meme engineer for the National inSecurity State used to convey the idea of a safe, controlled, environment that reflects the competency of the US government. That's the main subliminal theme of CIA-Disney since the Cold War.
Sports are used to convey similar large memes that support the US government - the level playing field of meritocracy, mock organized warfare, male power domination, etc.

Someone died at Disney Paris.
People mutilated and injured in the US including the Tea Cup ride (which was not Disney, corrected, thanks.)

And a few days later the AP gives us a positive framing of both amusement parks in general and the specific Tea Cup ride. Thanks to JoeHillsHoist for looking at the name on the byline of the AP article for clues.

No, these aren't messages from 'angels of the universe.'
Quite the opposite. Terrestrial agents again.

But either you take these events as coincidental or you accept some probability of manipulation based on the long track record of just that and apply-
means
motive
opportunity
precedent
context.
Last edited by Hugh Manatee Wins on Tue Jul 10, 2007 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby professorpan » Tue Jul 10, 2007 3:34 pm

But either you take these events as coincidental or you accept some probability of manipulation based on the long track record of just that and apply-
means
motive
opportunity
precedent
context.


Preconceived ideas about how things work.
Using confirmation bias to seek connections.
Constructing illogical, unprovable, and implausible mechanisms for the connections.
Triumphantly announcing the examples as evidence of a nearly-omnipotent and all-pervasive meta-conspiracy.
Refusal to acknowledge criticism from others or to apply rigor in one's own theorizing.
Rinse and repeat ad nauseum.
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Education and knowledge = "preconceived."

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Tue Jul 10, 2007 3:59 pm

professorpan wrote:Preconceived ideas about how things work.
Using confirmation bias to seek connections.


ha ha. Anything learned and used to learn other things is just all "preconceived" and "confirmation bias," ay? Now that's circular un-reasoning.
I suppose the arrow just never hits the target. (That's an old model of how math showing you can always divide the distance to the target in half "proves" you can never hit the target.)
Pan's version of this arrow metaphor is 'nothing can be proven and we just see what we want to see, The End.' How convenient for those doing psy-ops.

Constructing illogical, unprovable, and implausible mechanisms for the connections.


Highly logical -
counterpropaganda against hostile information is a military s.o.p. and I have hard copy of psy-ops training from the Pentagon to prove it.

Highly plausible -
OSS and OWI and Disney documents from WWII show this was done.
1953 Psychological Strategy Board documents show CIA in Hollywood.
1976 Operation Mockingbird exposed in Senate hearings, CIA in media.

Triumphantly announcing the examples as evidence of a nearly-omnipotent and all-pervasive meta-conspiracy.


Anti-conspiricist straw man framing, "nearly-omnipotent," sheesh.

Refusal to acknowledge criticism from others or to apply rigor in one's own theorizing.


I've posted gobs of documents and history to back up my expose of media psy-ops.
Pan, you are a verbal trickster and an energy sink. Empirical evidence strongly suggests this.
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Re: Yahoo/AT&T foreshadow McCain's staff resignation.

Postby Jeff » Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:09 pm

Hugh Manatee Wins wrote:Sunday 7/8/07: Yahoo's "10 popular searches" lists "#4--resignation letters." ? Hunh!?
Tuesday 7/10/07: McCain's campaign staff resigns.


Seriously though, to what end?

To the broader issue of media manipulation and complicity we're probably all in general agreement. But your contention of obsessive and near universal micromanagement for no discernible purpose is simply not on.

Maybe what's happening here is relentless materialism being driven to absurd ends by your denying non-mechanistic causes and effects.
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Our early years.

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:25 pm

I've seen that 'Common Ground' magazine and it is New Age fluff much like other media designed to cheer up bright cultural creatives so they don't become the Weather Underground.

Dreams End, if you are reading, I've recently met people ensnared in some of that Stanford Research Institute stuff you wrote about on your blog. Nice tye-dye peaceniks being led right into DARPA memetic engineering cults.

From Jeff's linked article about "views of the Universe" which is too lacking in context but has this key point. Substitute "government" for "universe" and you get the rationale for counterproganda to mitigate the effect of 'hostile information'-

The choice to believe in a friendly or unfriendly universe undoubtedly begins in our early years. It may well be that people who are preternaturally content, seemingly at peace with themselves and the world, were introduced to “a friendly universe” through proper nurturing as infants. Their early experiences became the foundation for their psychic life.


Preventing 'the sixties' from happening again requires conditioning youth to believe the government is good and 'worth dying for.'

During the Cold War studies were (and still are) made on how children form their attitudes.
The USG knows this and applies media stimuli to grow the 'citizens' they want.
Disney does this and other assets do, too.

Here's a 1967 published example using studies from the 1950s- 1960s:
'The Development of Political Attitudes in Children by Robert D. Hess, Judith V. Torney'

This 1973 Vietnam War era statement by some concerned educators summarizes research findings on children's perceptions which are well known at CIA which co-opted all the behavioral sciences during the Cold War.

I'm pasting in a huge chunk of it because it is worth it-

http://www.acei.org/childwar.htm
ACEI POSITION PAPER
Children and War
BY THE ASSOCIATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL, 1973

>>begin excerpt<<
.....
What Does Research Tell Us?
For more than thirty years investigators have been finding that children have more current information about war than adults assume, and that wide individual differences exist both in interest exhibited and information possessed (see, for example, Bronte and Musgrove, 1943; Geddie and Hildreth, 1944).

Although this paper will not attempt a full comprehensive survey of research and literature related to children and war, references to a few studies may stimulate further search for pertinent materials by interested parents, teachers and students.

In a now classic study, War and Children (1943), Anna Freud and Dorothy Burlingame sought to assess the impact of the Second World War, especially the bombing, on English children. They discussed such disorders as enuresis and juvenile delinquency resulting from wartime stress, One major finding was that separation from parents during evacuation appeared to produce more disturbing effects than the sight of military destruction.

It would seem that children’s consciousness of war varies with world events; they are well aware that people die not only by violent means but as well by accident, illness or old age (see 1951 study by Rautman and Brower of war themes in the stories of elementary school children, comparing essays written during World War II and the Korean War).

In the early sixties, with the increasing threat of nuclear war, a cluster of studies raised questions about the relationship of childhood socialization to adult political beliefs.

Peter Cooper (1965), working with approximately 300 English and 100 Japanese children, aged seven through sixteen, sought to study the children’s stages of thought about war and peace from a framework similar to that of Piaget’s developmental levels. Cooper used open-ended questionnaires and interviews. His findings suggested what he called Schema of Conflict—leading him to hypothesize a transition in the children from early ego-centered assumptions that were essentially optimistic about possibilities of peaceful coexistence to a point where “with developing cognitive skills, usually at the teenage level, a war is related to conceptions of human psychology based upon hostile instinctual drives” (quoted in Torney and Morris, 1972, p. 12). But although Cooper concluded that with age the English children increased their acceptance of and justification for war, they did not appear to modify their much less tangible concepts of peace.

Trond Alvik (1968) shared Cooper’s views that preadolescence (ages eleven to thirteen) is a critically important time in the development of attitudes about war. In Alvik’s own study of Norwegian children he also found, as did investigators in Sweden and West Germany, that children tend to have fewer ideas about peace as an active process than they do about war. He stressed again the strong force of television as a source of information about concrete aspects of war.

In 1961 M. Schwebel undertook a major study of adolescents in junior and senior high schools to determine how they felt about the possibility of war and how they viewed the various measures such as fall-out shelters, designed to protect them in case war erupted. A year later, the same questions were asked during the first week of the Cuban crisis of a new group of 300 secondary-school young people. Surprisingly enough, the students were considerably more optimistic about the prospects for peace than their counterparts had been the year before. The later study also showed increased opposition to shelters. These studies, puzzling as some of the findings are, demonstrated convincingly that these children knew and cared deeply about the consequences of nuclear war. Yet most did not clearly visualize the possibility of their own death. Some of the replies showed resignation or helplessness or efforts to deny fear. The children stressed danger shelters could not cope with. Their great optimism about peace may have come with more open discussion about the issues during the Cuban crisis and awareness of peace-keeping machinery at work.

On the other hand, the reports of Sibylle K. Escalona (1965, 1971), enriched by her exceptional understandings of children’s psycho-social development, indicate less encouraging results. With a group of colleagues, she conducted a questionnaire-study in the early sixties, where in children (from the age of four up to adolescence) were asked what they thought the world would be like by the time they grew up; no mention of war or weapons was made by the researchers. Of the total sample, more than 70 percent spontaneously mentioned nuclear weapons and destructive war as a likely possibility. A relatively large proportion (including even first-, second- and third-graders) expressed pessimism about the future; many spoke of a 50-50 chance of survival. Either “the bomb” would drop, bringing devastating war and death – or a wonderful new world of technology would result. Only a small group expressed hope that their dreams for a positive future might materialize.

More significant than the indication of anxiety was the impoverishing, weakening effect on ego- development in the crucial middle childhood years resulting form viewing the adults in their world as passive, hopeless, powerless victims who were unable to supply needed supports and models of impulse-control.

Other significant studies of children’s attitudes toward political authority have been made by Robert Hess (1963, 1967) and Judith Torney (1967) and by Fred Greenstein (1969). Hess found the most important source of children’s conceptions of authority to be the civic instruction that goes on in ways incidental to normal activities in the family, whereby children overhear parental conversations and either sense or are informally told of parents’ stance toward political authority and public questions.

L. S. Wrightman (1964) investigated by questionnaire the fears of seventy-two seventh- and eighth-grade boys about the chances of war. Later their answers were related to the responses of their parents to similar questions as well as to the boys’ own responses to a variety of measures indicating maladjustment in adolescents. The extent of those children’s fears about the possibility of war was found to be related to how much their parents talked about war, whether parents themselves expected war int he next ten years, and how much these adults worried about its occurring. The fears were not related to the boys’ own aggressiveness, however, or to self-ideal discrepancy or negative views of human nature.

Over a ten-year period W. E. Lambert and Otto Klineberg (1967) interviewed six-, ten-, and fourteen-year-olds from ten different countries concerning the children’s views of foreign peoples. The researchers found that early experiences tend to establish basic predispositions toward one’s own group and foreign peoples, which continue to manifest themselves through out life. Their results demonstrated clearly that the conceptions people develop of their own national group in relation to these may well have long-term consequences. A stereotyping process appears to start very early in the child’s own group and gradually comes to mark certain foreign groups as outstanding examples of people who are different. Children’s attitudes toward foreign peoples were found to vary from one national setting to another, depending upon the techniques used by educators to differentiate their own group from another. Clearly, significant adults in the child’s environment transfer their own emotionally toned views of other peoples to the child at an early age.

In another important cross-national study of childrearing practices, Urie Bronfenbrenner (1970) found current American society segregated by age, race and class. His findings again stressed that television and the child’s peer group acted as prime socializing agencies, with the family becoming less and less prominent to acculturation. To offset the negative consequences of this shift in childrearing responsibilities, Bronfenbrenner suggests several changes from the classroom and the school as well as for the family, the neighborhood and the larger community. He emphasized the significance of modeling, social reinforcement and group processes through which adults involve themselves more deeply in the lives of children. Whether or not we find his solutions too simplistic, he does challenge teachers to see themselves as guides and citizens with important and sustaining responsibility for children.

>>end excerpt<<
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Re: Yahoo/AT&T foreshadow McCain's staff resignation.

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Tue Jul 10, 2007 5:28 pm

Jeff wrote:
Hugh Manatee Wins wrote:Sunday 7/8/07: Yahoo's "10 popular searches" lists "#4--resignation letters." ? Hunh!?
Tuesday 7/10/07: McCain's campaign staff resigns.


Seriously though, to what end?


To mitigate the discrediting of the word "resignation."
Besides McCain getting SHOT DOWN yet again as a civilian, the GOP is deserting the White House like rats from a sinking battleship.
Coming up soon is the September 'assessement' of the 'surge' in Iraq and things are rapidly falling apart for the USG.

One thing to consider that those of you who don't study psy-ops probably don't realize:
Perceptions that affect the government's ability to control the citizenry are massaged on the principle that waves of awareness can rock the ship of state ala 'the sixties' and all waves must be therefore minimized.

If too many people thought that purple dinosaurs had taken over the White House, there would be 'stability operations' psy-ops to counter that perception even though it is not true. So some 'cover-ups' are for stabilization (preserving adherence to 'authority' and don't 'prove' something must be true.


To the broader issue of media manipulation and complicity we're probably all in general agreement. But your contention of obsessive and near universal micromanagement for no discernible purpose is simply not on.


"No discernable purpose??!!"..."Obsessive?"....
Keep in mind what I explained about preventing 'the sixties' and stability operations.

The nuclear age made for a war-skittish atmosphere that was propagandized heavily with humor (Dr. Strangelove), fictionalization (many examples), and even AMUSEMENT PARK RIDES like the nuclear sub rides at Disneyland attended by VP Nixon's family.

The Pentagon definition of counterpropaganda:
"Counterpropaganda is propaganda directed at the target audience or audiences of enemy propaganda. It includes all those actions taken to minimize or neutralize the effect of enemy or other hostile propaganda. While counterpropaganda is basically a defensive measure taken to limit the effectiveness of enemy propaganda, it is not defensive in a negative sense. Utilizing imagination, ingenuity, and innovation, a PSYOP specialist can initiate a well-planned, aggressive, counterpropaganda offensive."

Maybe what's happening here is relentless materialism being driven to absurd ends by your denying non-mechanistic causes and effects.

Oh, the 'universe' is manifesting our 'collective conscsiousness?' ROTFLMAO.
:?

Maybe what's happening here is National inSecurity State psy-ops for 'national will' and 'stability operations' caused by humans using media assets.
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Re: Yahoo/AT&T foreshadow McCain's staff resignation.

Postby jingofever » Tue Jul 10, 2007 6:02 pm

Hugh Manatee Wins wrote:To mitigate the discrediting of the word "resignation."


How does that work?
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Re: Yahoo/AT&T foreshadow McCain's staff resignation.

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Tue Jul 10, 2007 6:27 pm

jingofever wrote:
Hugh Manatee Wins wrote:To mitigate the discrediting of the word "resignation."


How does that work?

Emotions are transferable. Certainty and doubt are contagious and get applied to other topics in your mind.

OK, you are a target audience teenager whose view of The American System, War, and Authority is very important to the government.

You pick up cues about 'what everyone else thinks and is seeing' from your peer group talking about the latest media products. You want to be like them and fit in. So you learn sports statistics and what the latest Matt Damon movie is. (His movies, by the way, are sequenced to lead his fans to conclusions about JFK, for instance.)

You also pick up cues from Award Shows, top 10 lists, best-seller lists, Letterman jokes, etc.

But there you are on the internet where you can misspell 'Baer' and get Robert Bauer's book about US-Saudi relations. (Watch another spelling bee movie, kid!)

So the front page of Yahoo is pre-loaded with flashing ads and "Featured" boxes for you to click on and go safe places. If you skip to your email page you get a repeat of the news headlines from the front page. Only the 'hostile story' is now included in the number 4 slot which is hardest on the eye to find after scanning the top 3 stories and bottom one which perfectly match the front page list of stories so you assume they are identical and breeze on to your email and spam.

I watch this placement device for 'burying the lead story' happen alot. This is Operation Mockingbird s. o. p. , like putting the 'hostile info' near the end of a long article so only the hardcore reader finds it and they aren't the psy-ops target anyway.

But even if you don't buy the front page's offered clicks and just scan it before going off to your emails, you will get a subliminal impression of 'how things are.'

And if you see that the #4 search on Yahoo is for "resignation letters," then you are likely to file away a subconscious impression that 'resignations are common, no big whoop.'
Maybe that concurrently featured news article about the Afghan minister reinforces your lack of concern since you can't even find it on a map.

This pre-emptive framing of "resignation" as ho-hum can prevent you from thinking that there is something seriously wrong when that GOP guy who doesn't scare us too much suddenly has all his key campaign staff RESIGN, a stunning vote of 'no-confidence' which amplifies the same thing going on for the White House.

And then recruiting becomes even harder.
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Postby robert d reed » Tue Jul 10, 2007 7:29 pm

huh?

that was an awful lot of labor, to bring forth a point so generalized, so mundane, that it isn't so much a summation as a homily.

It'll say this- it doesn't lack for certitude.

HMW's posts never do. As far as setting a self-confident, "authoritative" tone, he's up there with the top ranks of bureaucratic flacks for the Bush Administration.
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Postby orz » Tue Jul 10, 2007 9:09 pm

I think it's fair to say that we've collectively overloaded Hugh's CPU limit.
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Postby professorpan » Tue Jul 10, 2007 9:59 pm

orz wrote:I think it's fair to say that we've collectively overloaded Hugh's CPU limit.


Image

"Computer – this is a Class A Priority Directive: Compute, to the last digit, the value of pi."
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Postby Joe Hillshoist » Wed Jul 11, 2007 3:22 am

From Jeff's linked article about "views of the Universe" which is too lacking in context but has this key point. Substitute "government" for "universe" and you get the rationale for counterproganda to mitigate the effect of 'hostile information'-


Hugh thats a dangerous path and I know a few people who have lost it by following that guideline to rigourously.

Trond Alvik (1968) shared Cooper’s views that preadolescence (ages eleven to thirteen) is a critically important time in the development of attitudes about war. In Alvik’s own study of Norwegian children he also found, as did investigators in Sweden and West Germany, that children tend to have fewer ideas about peace as an active process than they do about war. He stressed again the strong force of television as a source of information about concrete aspects of war.


Possibly, but I was a bit obsessed by war as a kid, and that was before my parents owned a television. i didn't read books about it either.

my grandad was a ww1 vet tho, so possibly he had an influence. He also told me that war was pretty ugly and wrong, and a last resort really.

But thats a cultural thing that goes beyond government management IMO.

I was actually the first generation not to go war in Australia, if you count Korea, Vietnam and the various crises in the south pacific and se asia, so in some ways I kind of think that idea of the vets of ww1, the war to END wars was a good one. Pity i was probably the last generation not to go to war as well.

Prhaps you have a point tho, as the tradition of going off to war ends, and the family feedback on the idea disappears perhaps the govt needs to do something to keep people keen.

Trond Alvik (1968) shared Cooper’s views that preadolescence (ages eleven to thirteen) is a critically important time in the development of attitudes about war.


This is probably related to puberty and in males to hormones and how successful violence is btw. I am sure tv has a role, but possibly other things effect it as well. I watched heaps of tv about war at that age and am not that infavour of it at all. perhaps tho the other influences i had put that in context.

I think Pan's right about this too:

Refusal to acknowledge criticism from others or to apply rigor in one's own theorizing.


Especially the first bit. Its not about posting gobs of data, its about acknowledging what other people say and seeing if it can improve your ideas. Not about assuming they are trying to discredit or attack you.


Transformers Keyword Hijack


I did a little thought excperiment with keyword hijacking today. the movie Transformers is opening around Australia today, to the usual buckets of hype. What is transformner a kh of? The first thought that came to me was "Of course a Lou Reed record - Transformer."

And if you think about it, its actually a good example tho in a slightly different context to your usual one with govt psy ops re fascism.

Transformers the movie is KH to keep young kids straight. Transformer the record deals with what some people would call deviant sexuality. The movie and cartoon deals with hyper masculinity, esp the sort that claims to be straight.

KH by the new puritanism?

Possibly, even the old cartoon jingle "Transformers, more than meets the eye." Shifts attention away from Reeds NY transformers into something akin to a fascist technofetishist monster. I admit this started as a joke, but looking at it from another level maybe there is something in it.

Consider the names Autobots (hows that for subliminal programming, the good guys are Autobots), and get this Decepticons, Decepti Cons. Like the bad transformers are deceptive, just like Lou Reeds transformers. And Cons to boot(tho not the conservative sort, well some people might say that some cconservative are cons as in frauds or crims but I am digressing.)

I never watched that much of the Transformrs growing up, and am not planning on seeing the movie, but my younger bro was into them, so I actually saw a few episodes. Pretty shit, and their leaders name was what Optimus Prime, more like Optimal prat but anyway. he was a classic authority figure.

Furthermore, the repression of homosexuality seems IMO to go hand in hand with Nazism. All that leather, parades and worship of symbolic phalluses (ie weapons).

Now this started as a bit of a joke, I didn't really think its that likely, but it could be.

But its just as likely that the human minds ability to make connections can result in something that becomes quite creative. Thats my major criticism of your KH idea Hugh. At what point are you getting to creative and inventing connections that aren't there. Cos that could destroy what could be a very useful tool.
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Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Wed Jul 11, 2007 4:47 am

Non-responses from rdr, orz, and pan who remain mysteriously drawn to me...moving right along.

TV and movies are used by USG disinfoteers as morality tales just like those in the Christian church back in medieval times. And academia determines conventional wisdom for the reading classes.

Like Don Knotts, Bob Denver was used as a prop in Cold War morality plays.
He played the anti-hero male, the unter-menschen foil for more uber co-stars in both 'Dobie Gillis' and 'Gilligan's Island.'

And there is something common to both his TV names, Krebs and Gilligan:
definitions which are hostile to military recruiting.

First Denver was in the TV show 'Dobie Gillis' as a funny slacker-but-upbeat beatnik named Krebs, Maynard Krebs.
>Krebs was also the name of an Ernest Hemingway character in the short story 'Soldier's Home' who came back from World War I in a state of dispair and alienation. Not a good role model for American boys who should be enthusiastically containing Communism.

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Hemingway-Ernest-3413/Soldier-Home-Ernest-Hemingway.htm
People treat Krebs more like an outcast than a hero.
....
Lying makes Krebs feel lost within himself and in a sense bitter towards the war, there the theme of alienation sets in.
.....
If anything, he seems disciplined to do nothing significant with his life. Ironically, he has been cast into a role of passive observer rather than the active participant he seemed to be in heading off to assist in the war effort.


The Ivy League disinfoteers would know about Hemingway's anti-war Krebs although I doubt they thought that too many of their TV audience did. Perhaps this was a small inside joke. But there's too much correlation with Cold War themes.

I have to wonder whether Hemingway's Krebs was what led to the 'Dobie Gillis' show in the first place since Hemingway's character perfectly described what the TV psy-ops boys would be tasked with negating by their advisors on the Psychological Strategy Board.

So it is highly likely Bob Denver's beatnik named Krebs was displacing a hostile unit of meaning with a chosen decoy to mitigate a potential negative role model since the oh-so-macho-and-American Hemingway is taught in public schools and colleges.

Ivy League war-pimping disinfoteers know their American literary icons and where the peacenik danger is in their writing.

In 1973 a book on Mark Twain was published which portrayed his anti-war writing from his later years (The War Poem, I am an Anti-Imperialist, etc.) as merely the bitter rantings of a broken old man.

The book was written by Universtiy of Chicago grad Hamlin Hill and called 'Mark Twain: God's Fool.'
It doesn't take George Lakoff to see the framing in that title.

In 1985 the US government sent Hamlin Hill on an international speaking tour to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Twain's birth. No wonder.
And that negative framing title became the name for American Literature Association Conference roundtables on the state of Mark Twain biography in the 1990s.

This illustrates how academia creates and reinforces perceptions for the influential reading classes and how the topics of America and War are influenced by the US government.

The efforts to prevent any demilitarizing of American culture was the goal of the keyword hijacking in Bob Denver's most famous role as 'Gilligan'from 1964-1967.

And the threat, no surprise, was a smart woman in academia.

Carol Gilligan was a highly visible to the CIA because she was a ground-breaking researcher in social psychology at Harvard where she got her PhD in 1964 and went on to teach with the superstar in that field, Erik Erikson. So she had BIG creds in her field and her research with conclusions would be likely to have widespread influence on American academia. And it did. She's gone on to be a superstar herself in gender studies and started a research center with $12 million from Jane Fonda, speaking of recruiting obstacles.

http://www.webster.edu/~woolflm/gilligan.html

Carol Gilligan specialized in gender studies and interviewed men considering signing up to go to Vietnam.

She threatened both the male chauvinism of the Ivy League class and especially the 'Father Knows Best' recruiting theme being used to shovel young men towards Vietnam with her findings on moral development which validated women's as equal to men's at the very least and perhaps superior in some ways.

Compare that viewpoint to the 'Good Shepard' male dominance sanctioned by the TV image of problematic child women like Lucy or Jeannie or That Girl.
Gender image continues to be the single most useful tool for recruiting and women remain overshadowed by their male counterparts on most TV shows and in movies. Except where they are being recruited themselves, of course.

So it seems that this threat to American Cold War gender doctrine, a woman named Carol Gilligan, was keyword hijacked into a recruiting device, the untermenschen male named Gilligan who was a clownish detriment to the survival of his shipmates.

Alan Hale, who played the alpha male Skipper, had the same recruiting role as the tough-as-nails all-by-the-book sargeant in the WWII propaganda movie starring Ronald Reagan called 'This is the Army' which I just watched.

I'm in detox now....
Last edited by Hugh Manatee Wins on Wed Jul 11, 2007 3:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Thanks, Joe. "criticism," Dr. Narut - Naruto.

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Wed Jul 11, 2007 5:12 am

I'm grateful for your thoughtful comments, JoesHillsHoist.
I've been getting willful obstructionism from pan for over a year now, plus endless drive by insults from orz and rdr.
THAT'S why I don't spend much time in their energy traps anymore while pan crows that I don't accept "honest" criticism.

War pimping only gets so many johns to go into that dark room.
Your comments on 'Transformers' leads to some fruitful recruiting themes.

Kids are told all through childhood that getting bigger and stronger is their goal so it is very easy to use that psychic momentum to glamorize weapons, power dominance, and fascist values.

And that's exactly what 'Transformers' taps, the urge to become Power.
Same with super heroes. Or any 'hero' for that matter. The ultimate social sanction.

Speaking of toys, have you seen 'Naruto?'

There's something going on here with this 'Naruto' thing and I'm not sure just what.

Last year when I was searching up articles on the leak by Navy doctor Thomas Narut about US programs to turn killers into government assassins with violence conditioning from viewing horrific movies and desensitization and dehumanizing, I found that search results were mostly for a Japanese fantasy comic of some kind with references to controlling a capricious but powerful inner force.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naruto_Uzumaki
When he first accesses it, Naruto is unable to retain control when using the demon fox's chakra, allowing its innate rage and anger to take over his personality. Over time, Naruto gains more control over the demon fox, allowing him to retain his personality while using its chakra. However, his degree of control is determined by the amount of chakra he draws upon and his emotional state. As he becomes more emotional and draws on more of the demon fox's chakra, his own personality is gradually supplanted by the demon fox's.


"!" I thought to myself.
But I considered that this was just another one of those odd Japanese pop culture items. Maybe just a coincidence, "Narut"...."Naruto." Hmmm.

But then Naruto action figures made by Mattel showed up at my chain drugstore toy section right next to the World Wrestling action figures called the "Ruthless Aggression" series.
The receipt (I bought one) for the Naruto figure reads: Mattel Death K5825 1T.

What do you make of this, Joe? I'm not inclined to see this as 'coincidence' anymore.
I think there's a good possibility that a US marketing effort was made to displace the Thomas Narut story with Naruto-

http://www.statecraft.org/chapter15.html

Another branch of military psychology applicable to the elite counterterrorist units was "atrocity research," studies of why atrocities occur and the personality traits associated with killers. A navy research project led by psychologist Sigmund Streufert was the subject of awkward questions in 1971 by Congressman Cornelius Gallagher, who found the research to be "designed to measure how different individuals value human life; in other words to screen for those who, attaching little value to life, might make good killers."46' More disturbing is evidence of research into means of conditioning military personnel into more efficient killers. Peter Watson, in his study of the military use of psychology, refers to a 1975 NATO-sponsored conference on stress and anxiety in which U.S. Navy doctor Thomas Narut lectured on "symbolic modeling," by which people could be taught to cope with certain stresses, techniques that he said were "being used with 'combat readiness units' to train people to cope with the stress of killing."47 The methods were reportedly used for commando teams and special navy operatives, and they involved the screening of "films specially designed to show people being killed in violent ways. By being acclimatized through these films, the men were supposed eventually to become able to disassociate their emotions from such situations. "48 Other aspects of the program included training aimed at "stress reduction" and "dehumanization of the enemy." Dr. Narut reportedly also described the screening procedure for men with "passive aggressive personalities" suitable for "commando tasks":

>>They are people with a lot of drive, though they are well-disciplined and do not appear nervous, who periodically experience bursts of explosive energy when they can literally kill without remorse. Dr. Narut said that he and colleagues had therefore been looking for men who had shown themselves capable of killing in this premeditated way.49<<


There is a cover-up of the USG using violence in media to both obtain recruits and desensitize people so they won't react in outrage to the slaughter.

Note meme-reversal: The conditioning in Burgess' novel and Kubrick's movie is the opposite of Dr. Narut's report. In the movie watching violence sensitizes Alex to it instead of desensitizing him.
Exactly the opposite again. Did the USG request this to prevent us understanding their use of violence conditioning on us?

Aha. An article saying Anthony Burgess was involved with MKULTRA work and put it in his novel-
http://members.aol.com/smartnews/Sample-Issue-47.htm

CIA mind-control trials revealed as secret inspiration behind 'A Clockwork Orange'

By James Morrison - Arts and Media Correspondent 10/13/02

"Anthony Burgess was inspired to write his most famous novel A Clockwork Orange by his real-life involvement in CIA-run mind-control experiments, a new biography claims....The new biography claims A Clockwork Orange's central theme - the use of brainwashing to quell evil impulses in the criminal mind - arose from Burgess's involvement with the British secret service and the CIA experiments. It argues that many of the novel's other trademarks, including Nadsat, the fictional slang in which it is written, stem from the author's dealings with secret agents...When asked about the famous scene in which government scientists pump images of torture into the mind of its delinquent antihero, Alex, to rid him of violent thoughts, he dismissed it as an idea that came to him in a dream. Now, a decade after Burgess's death, respected biographer Roger Lewis believes he may have uncovered the truth, thanks to a mysterious retired British intelligence agent. According to the anonymous source, Burgess became involved with the CIA while working as a Colonial Service education officer in Malaya in the 1950s." http://www.independent.co.uk/story.jsp?story=342016


And this next item is interesting when you remember that the anti-violence conditioning in 'A Clockwork Orange' included linking negative stimuli to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.
I'll bet this is where the idea for the music came from in 'A Clockwork Orange.'

Image

http://www.amateras.com/trip/japan/naruto/naruto-e.htm

Naruto is the memorial place
where "Daiku" was performed for the first time in Japan.

"Daiku", it literally means "the Ninth",
as Japanese call Beethoven's Ninth Symphony,
is very popular among Japanese.


German prisoners of the World War I, who were detained in a war prisoner's camp
in Naruto , performed the symphony for the first time in Japan.

They played their handmade instruments.

"The Ninth Symphony" concert is held in Naruto once a year, on the first Sunday of June ,
in commemoration of the first performance of Japan.
CIA runs mainstream media since WWII:
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