NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby 82_28 » Sun Jan 10, 2010 9:25 pm

In my opinion, tonight's Green Bay/Arizona game was fixed. Not a fan of either.

Aaron Rodgers was clearly hit helmet to helmet on one late play -- illegal to do to a QB as of this year. And in overtime, he was brought down with an easy to see facemask in which he fumbled and gave up the game winning overtime touchdown. Two easy calls. Absolutely no commentary about it from the play by play announcers. The commenters on espn.com are beginning to come alive with talk of this as we speak.
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby monster » Sun Jan 10, 2010 9:45 pm

82_28 wrote:In my opinion, tonight's Green Bay/Arizona game was fixed. Not a fan of either.

Aaron Rodgers was clearly hit helmet to helmet on one late play -- [...] Absolutely no commentary about it from the play by play announcers.


Troy Aikman (announcer) did mention the helmet-to-helmet at the time.

I'm not shy to call a game fixed, but I didn't see anything amiss in this one. But you've made me curious enough to turn on ESPN radio to hear what the speculation is.
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Re:

Postby MinM » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:57 am

Last edited by MinM on Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby 82_28 » Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:02 am

Nice screen cap of Smith and Bush. I noticed that shit myself. It also looks like we have another sighting of a woman in red.
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby 82_28 » Wed Jan 20, 2010 10:35 pm

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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby JackRiddler » Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:58 am

http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/d ... igfan1.jpg

Just saw it last night - hair-raisingly realistic. I know a million of these guys! (Okay, some weeks I am these guys - like this week with the Jets. At least I can say the Jet playoff games were the first NFL games I watched this season.)

Sad comedy.
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby JackRiddler » Sat Jan 23, 2010 2:48 am

So.

If the NFL is fixed, does this mean the Jets will win tomorrow?!

In that case, I'm for it.
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby MinM » Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:03 am

Another sports-related story about the man behind the Tebow ad, James Dobson:
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Maravich
After the injury forced him to leave basketball in the fall of 1980, Maravich became a recluse for two years. Through it all, Maravich said he was searching "for life." He tried the practices of yoga and Hinduism, read Trappist monk Thomas Merton's The Seven Storey Mountain and took an interest in the field of ufology, the study of unidentified flying objects. He also explored vegetarianism and macrobiotics. Eventually, he embraced evangelical Christianity. A few years before his death, Maravich said, "I want to be remembered as a Christian, a person that serves Him to the utmost. Not as a basketball player."

On January 5, 1988, Pete Maravich collapsed and died, at age 40, of a heart attack while playing in a pickup basketball game in the gym at the First Church of the Nazarene in Pasadena with a group that included Focus on the Family head James Dobson. (Maravich had flown out from his home in Louisiana to tape a segment for Dobson's radio show that aired later that day.) Dobson has said that his last words, less than a minute before he died, were "I feel great." An autopsy revealed the cause of death to be a rare congenital defect; he had been born with a missing left coronary artery, a vessel which supplies blood to the muscle fibers of the heart. His right coronary artery was grossly enlarged and had been compensating for the defect.

"He'll be remembered always", former LSU head basketball coach Dale Brown said on hearing the news of Maravich's death.[cite this quote]

At the age of 25 and years before his death, Maravich had told Pennsylvania reporter, Andy Nuzzo, "I don't want to play 10 years in the NBA and then die of a heart attack at 40."

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Focus on La Familia: How Dobson's outfit inspires one of the deadliest Mexican drug cartels | Crooks and Liars
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News Hounds: James Dobson, Big Boobs & the Lingerie Bowl
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby Pele'sDaughter » Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:12 pm

Peyton a Double Agent? Some Think So

2/22/2010 6:40 PM ET By Terence Moore

INDIANAPOLIS -- It's been a couple of weeks since the Indianapolis Colts suffered that come-from-ahead loss in the Super Bowl. And, yes, the New Orleans Saints were pretty good along the way to riding those Who Dat wings of destiny to a world championship, but the Colts mostly blew it.

So you just wonder: What do those around here think about The Interception and the legacy of their historically golden quarterback who was tarnished by it all? With the Colts driving in the final minutes for a game-tying touchdown, Peyton Manning was the anti-Joe Montana by firing toward teammate Reggie Wayne with one hand on the ball and the other around his throat.

That's me talking.

I sought the views of the Colt Nation, and this was interesting: Spanning from Monument Circle to Conseco Fieldhouse to Circle Center Mall to the area near the little race track that features 500 miles each May, a slew of folks alluded to the "c" word, but not for choke. They viewed The Interception as their version of a second gunman on the grassy knoll -- as in conspiracy.

Among the conspiracists, some said Manning threw The Interception on purpose to defensive back Tracy Porter who sprinted 74 yards for a touchdown to seal the Saints' 31-17 victory. Most said he threw it subconsciously.

Whatever the case, both sides said Manning had the Saints' welfare more than that of the Colts dancing around his mind at the moment.

Consider the evidence for the conspiracists: Manning was born and raised in New Orleans. And his father, Archie, is legendary around the Gulf Coast region. And the Mannings (which includes New York Giants quarterback Eli) knew as well as anybody before the game how much a world championship in New Orleans would brighten the souls of those still recovering from Hurricane Katrina. And Wayne, who possibly ran a shoddy route against Porter, also is from New Orleans.


Share I'm not buying the conspiracy thing, by the way. All I know is that truly great quarterbacks aren't intercepted in these situations. That's a choke. I'll leave the other "c" word to many in the Colt Nation.

For instance ...

"I honestly think Peyton Manning gave them the game. He gave them the game," said John Fraction, 40, an Indianapolis native, swinging his fists at nothing but air after he took a break from serving tables at a downtown sports bar. He spent the Super Bowl rubbing his lucky horseshoes that he swears helped the Colts win their first and only world championship for Indianapolis in 2007.

This time, when the horseshoes became just a bunch of rusty iron in Fraction's world after the Colts botched a 10-0 lead, he recalled how he wiped tears from his cheeks, and then said softly to himself, "There it is."

Added Fraction, "I'm speaking for myself. You know? There's that dilemma that this guy faced, because Peyton Manning is an outstanding quarterback. It just seemed like a battle between pride and greed. Peyton Manning wanted to win a second Super Bowl ring in front of everybody and keep it for himself. That was greed, but pride took over. And you also had the completion thing in play.

"Peyton just looked at it as if he were being a better humanitarian if the Saints won the Super Bowl, especially given what the city of New Orleans had gone through. So he got a ring, and Eli got a ring (the year after Peyton in 2008), and in a sense, maybe Archie got a ring with the Saints winning this Super Bowl."

Give or take a few points, others echoed Fraction.

There was Deagria Cook, for instance, whose customers as a hair stylist in town include some of the Colts cheerleaders.

What were Cook's first thoughts with The Interception? "It was all of our thoughts, when we were watching the game during a conference in Arizona, and it was 'Oh, my goodness. He gave this away. Did he really just give it away like that?' " said Cook, another Indianapolis native, shaking her head, between bites at a downtown restaurant. "I mean, really. 'Was that intentional?' That's what we were thinking. At the same time, I felt it was great for the Saints for what it would do for their city. We had our moment a couple of years ago when we won it.

"But, yeah, seriously. Was that intentional?"

Was it?

Greg Ballard laughed. Then he laughed some more.

Not only is Ballard a staunch sports fan as another Indianapolis native who has bled blue and white since the Colts came to town in 1984, but he is the mayor of Indianapolis. He couldn't stop laughing from the conference room next to his office when told of the Manning conspiracists who won't back down.

"So Peyton works his entire life to get this point, and he's going to throw it all away," said Ballard, laughing again. His press secretary, Robert Vane, added nearby, between chuckles, "And we also never landed on the moon."

But, seriously. Was that intentional?

Said Ballard, easing into the non-nonsense voice that he used when he was a lieutenant colonel for the Marines, "That's ludicrous. It's just plain ludicrous for people to think that way (about the Super Bowl). There is no question that Peyton Manning wanted to win that game. Even if you remember what happened after that onsides kick (by the Saints to begin the second half). New Orleans went down and scored, and what happened right after that? Peyton drove them right back down the field, and the Colts took the lead right back. That tells you what kind of guy he is."

This is the kind of guy who still is beloved throughout Indiana, especially around Indianapolis, and for good reason. Not only does Manning have a record four NFL MVP awards, and not only did he help the Colts win more games during a given decade than any team in league history, but he is extremely charismatic (see his commercials), and he is an noted philanthropist. In fact, he gave so much of his time, money and spirit to the St. Vincent Children's Hospital through the years in Indianapolis that they named the place after Manning in 2007.

He studies more than any quarterback in the game. He also works harder than any quarterback in the game.

That's not the profile of a game-thrower.

"No, no, no," said Michael Stern, 44, a limousine driver, who was waiting for a client outside of a downtown hotel. Stern is yet another Indianapolis native, and he has met Manning. Added Stern, "I've met all of them. I've driven Eli, Archie and all of them around, and I'll tell you about Peyton. He's always involved with something involved in this city, which tells you he'd never do anything bad to this city."

Not on purpose.

When you choke, you can't help it.
Read More: Colts Saints Super Bowl peyton+man


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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby JackRiddler » Wed Feb 24, 2010 2:00 am

The language is so debased that this speculation about what thoughts went through one man's head in one moment, spontaneously, perhaps subconsciously, is referred to sixteen times in this article as a "conspiracy theory" and compared to the moon hoax? And this is worthy of taking it to the mayor, who is treated as the Final Authority.

Who did Manning conspire with, the Sky God? (The conspiracy of course is of sports fans on the losing side playing a very typical game: The Saints didn't win, we gave it away!)

Never mind, I'm fine with it because I just realized that by this standard, Oswald-alone now counts as conspiracy theory!
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby beeline » Tue May 25, 2010 3:27 pm

And here I was thinking Canadians were honorable!

___________________________________________________________________________________

Link

Canadiens deny 'SandGate' skate sabotage of Flyers in Montreal

We have seen the goofiest controversy of the 2010 Stanley Cup Playoffs, and it is "SandGate."

During Saturday's 3-0 Game 4 Eastern Conference final victory by the Philadelphia Flyers over the Montreal Canadiens, NBC's Pierre McGuire made a curious observation according to the Philadelphia Daily News: That "sand or some other foreign substance" was covering the hallway floor near the Flyers' dressing room.

Sand and razor-sharp skate blades don't mix, and the Flyers had several players leave the ice for what appeared to be skate issues during the game. By the third period, there were towels down on the floor covering the substance so the team could safely traverse it.

From Philly.com, which reported that Flyers defenseman Kimmo Timonen(notes) left twice and captain Mike Richards(notes) left the ice three times for skate sharpening:

Scott Hartnell(notes), Darroll Powe(notes) and Claude Giroux(notes) also missed shifts during the game to have their skates repaired. "I think it was five times that I had to get my skates sharpened tonight, which is obviously a bit much," Richards said. "I'm not sure [what happened]. I didn't check the carpet for [sand]."

Richards said Flyers assistant equipment manager Harry Bricker, the man in charge of skate sharpening, said the substance on the floor was "a little too big for being sand pellets."

Was it purposeful sabotage by Montreal?

A few Flyers wouldn't rule it out in anonymous comments to the DelCo Times after the game. The local FOX affiliate in Philadelphia also openly questioned the origins and intent of the foreign substance.

With all this attention, the Canadiens naturally had to answer questions about SandGate despite being one loss away from their Cinderella run ending Monday night in Philly. Coach Jacques Martin denied any sand-bagging of the Flyers hallway; he told The Gazette that both teams had skate problems and placed the blame on "new composite sticks" causing damage to skates.

Defenseman Jaroslav Spacek(notes), meanwhile, was a bit more merciless in his response to the controversy:

"I thought they had diarrhea, going back and forth from the locker room," Montreal defenseman Jaroslav Spacek said on Sunday. "The guys were talking on the plane. What happened? ... If (the Flyers) have trouble, maybe they can wear those skate protectors like figure skaters," Spacek said.

Provoking the Flyers or their fans? Never a good idea. As Barry Petchesky of Deadspin theorized, if this thing got out of hand, we could have seen the orange and black faithful tossing bags of sand on the ice after hat-tricks in Game 5.

What a strange bit of intentional or unintentional gamesmanship, entering the pantheon of such incidents as the New York Giants allegedly opening large metal doors to affect the wind on opponents' kicks in the old Meadowlands stadium. Seriously: Is there really any difference between teams figuratively skating sand against the Canadiens' defense and literally doing so?

We're not saying the Habs may have been trying to use a sandy hallway to gain an advantage over the Flyers, but they just hired Flint Marko as their new arena maintenance manager.

Whatever it was that affected the Flyers, it didn't affect them all that much: They're still one win away from returning to the Stanley Cup Finals for the first time since 1997 in an effort to win their first Cup since 1975. The Canadiens, meanwhile, are seeing their hopes slip away like sands through the hourgl ... uh, like something else fleeting.


Link

Mikey Miss: No Doubts About Sandgate

Mike Missanelli from 97.5 The Phanatic says there is no doubt that there was a foreign substance was found on the Flyers’ skates in Montreal.

“I don’t think there is any question somebody did a little funny business,” Missanelli said Monday on Good Day.

Missanelli said the foreign substance was rock salt or sand in the runway that led to the Flyers’ bench.

He said the effect of the was is to not only damage the Flyers’ skates, so they had to be sharpened, but also to slow down the Flyers as they skated all game.

“It’s like dulling anything,” Missanelli said.

On Sunday, the Montreal Canadiens openly laughed at charges someone tampered with the Flyers’ skates at the Bell Centre.

It took a day for anyone with the Canadiens or the Montreal media to comment on the NBC report that the Flyers’ best players had skate damage caused by the foreign substance near the Philadelphia bench.

By that time, the charges had made national news and Montreal became the butt of a lot of bad journalism puns.

"I thought they had diarrhea, going back and forth from the locker room," Montreal defenseman Jaroslav Spacek said on Sunday. "The guys were talking on the plane. What happened?"

"If (the Flyers) have trouble, maybe they can wear those skate protectors like figure skaters," Spacek said.

Montreal’s Scott Gomez said the Flyers were exaggerating.

"It's the playoffs. Hey, do whatever you can. But that's really stretching it."

Gomez didn’t sound contrite when he told reporters he hoped the Flyers’ star players were actually injured.

"They had some big names going and you're kind of hoping they're not going to come back. In the back of your mind you're hoping it's an injury," he said, laughing again.

On Monday, the local press in Philadelphia was having a field day – or a beach party – with the story.

Veteran Inquirer columnist Phil Sheridan, who has seen a lot of tricks in his day, said what most fans are thinking.

“Something was certainly rotten in the province of Quebec. “

On MyFoxPhilly.com, more than 80 percent of users polled believe Montreal tampered with the Flyers’ skates to get an edge.

Whatever Montreal did, it worked well for the Flyers, as they dominated the Sandgate game 3-0 and now have a chance to Monday night to put the series away in Philadelphia.
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby 82_28 » Sat Aug 07, 2010 10:08 am

Super Bowl XL ref: 'I'll go to my grave' with regret
RENTON, Wash. (AP) — Saying "I'll go to my grave" with regret, NFL referee Bill Leavy reopened a Seahawks' wound that won't heal by acknowledging he made mistakes in Seattle's disputed, 2006 Super Bowl loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

The veteran official began an annual training-camp rules interpretation session with the Seattle media after practice on Friday by bringing up the sore subject without being asked.

"It was a tough thing for me. I kicked two calls in the fourth quarter and I impacted the game, and as an official you never want to do that," said the veteran of 15 NFL seasons and two Super Bowls.

"It left me with a lot of sleepless nights, and I think about it constantly," Leavy said of the game in February 2006. "I'll go to my grave wishing that I'd been better."

Though Seattle played one of its poorest games of an otherwise wondrous season that day, several key calls went against the Seahawks in their 21-10 loss to the Steelers. It remains Seattle's only Super Bowl appearance.

This week is the first time since that game Leavy has been in Seattle with the Seahawks. He and a mini-crew arrived Thursday to help with the team's practices and give it a rules presentation.

Leavy didn't specify which plays he "kicked" that big day in Detroit.

But there are two late ones that people still talk about in Seattle — with disdain they usually reserve for cold, weak coffee.

Early in the fourth quarter, tackle Sean Locklear was called for holding on a pass completion that would have put the Seahawks at the Pittsburgh 1, poised for the tying touchdown. After the penalty, Matt Hasselbeck threw an interception, and then was called for a mysterious low block on a play that ended with him tackling Pittsburgh's Ike Taylor on the defensive back's return.

The penalty moved the Steelers from their 29 to the 44. Pittsburgh used its better field position to score the clinching touchdown four plays later.

The next day, then-Seahawks coach Mike Holmgren stoked Seattle's angry fire when he addressed fans upon the team landing back home. Holmgren told frustrated fans at a civic gathering at Qwest Field, "I knew it was going to be tough going up against the Pittsburgh Steelers. I didn't know we were going to have to play the guys in the striped shirts, as well."

Holmgren, now a top executive with the Cleveland Browns, has since said he's gotten over that game.

But Leavy hasn't.

"I know that I did my best at that time, but it wasn't good enough," said the retired police officer and firefighter in San Jose, Calif., who became an NFL referee in 2001. "When we make mistakes, you got to step up and own them. It's something that all officials have to deal with, but unfortunately when you have to deal with it in the Super Bowl it's difficult."

When high-profile referee Ed Hochuli visited the Seahawks' training camp in the months after that Super Bowl, he and his crew took good-natured ribbing from players.

"The Super Bowl was one of those games where it seemed the big calls went against Seattle," Hochuli said in August 2006. "And that was just fortuitous — bad fortuitous for Seattle.

"The league felt, actually, that the Super Bowl was well officiated. Now, that doesn't mean there were no mistakes. There are always mistakes, but it was a well-officiated game."


http://www.komonews.com/sports/100165249.html
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Re: NFL Conspiracy? Steelers-Chargers final play looks fishy

Postby anothershamus » Mon Aug 09, 2010 10:58 am

82_28 wrote:Super Bowl XL ref: 'I'll go to my grave' with regret
RENTON, Wash. (AP) — Saying "I'll go to my grave" with regret, NFL referee Bill Leavy reopened a Seahawks' wound that won't heal by acknowledging he made mistakes in Seattle's disputed, 2006 Super Bowl loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

The veteran official began an annual training-camp rules interpretation session with the Seattle media after practice on Friday by bringing up the sore subject without being asked.

"It was a tough thing for me. I kicked two calls in the fourth quarter and I impacted the game, and as an official you never want to do that," said the veteran of 15 NFL seasons and two Super Bowls.

"It left me with a lot of sleepless nights, and I think about it constantly," Leavy said of the game in February 2006. "I'll go to my grave wishing that I'd been better."

Though Seattle played one of its poorest games of an otherwise wondrous season that day, several key calls went against the Seahawks in their 21-10 loss to the Steelers. It remains Seattle's only Super Bowl appearance.

This week is the first time since that game Leavy has been in Seattle with the Seahawks. He and a mini-crew arrived Thursday to help with the team's practices and give it a rules presentation.

Leavy didn't specify which plays he "kicked" that big day in Detroit.

But there are two late ones that people still talk about in Seattle — with disdain they usually reserve for cold, weak coffee.

Early in the fourth quarter, tackle Sean Locklear was called for holding on a pass completion that would have put the Seahawks at the Pittsburgh 1, poised for the tying touchdown. After the penalty, Matt Hasselbeck threw an interception, and then was called for a mysterious low block on a play that ended with him tackling Pittsburgh's Ike Taylor on the defensive back's return.

The penalty moved the Steelers from their 29 to the 44. Pittsburgh used its better field position to score the clinching touchdown four plays later.

The next day, then-Seahawks coach Mike Holmgren stoked Seattle's angry fire when he addressed fans upon the team landing back home. Holmgren told frustrated fans at a civic gathering at Qwest Field, "I knew it was going to be tough going up against the Pittsburgh Steelers. I didn't know we were going to have to play the guys in the striped shirts, as well."

Holmgren, now a top executive with the Cleveland Browns, has since said he's gotten over that game.

But Leavy hasn't.

"I know that I did my best at that time, but it wasn't good enough," said the retired police officer and firefighter in San Jose, Calif., who became an NFL referee in 2001. "When we make mistakes, you got to step up and own them. It's something that all officials have to deal with, but unfortunately when you have to deal with it in the Super Bowl it's difficult."

When high-profile referee Ed Hochuli visited the Seahawks' training camp in the months after that Super Bowl, he and his crew took good-natured ribbing from players.

"The Super Bowl was one of those games where it seemed the big calls went against Seattle," Hochuli said in August 2006. "And that was just fortuitous — bad fortuitous for Seattle.

"The league felt, actually, that the Super Bowl was well officiated. Now, that doesn't mean there were no mistakes. There are always mistakes, but it was a well-officiated game."


http://www.komonews.com/sports/100165249.html


I quit following sports after the Rose Bowl with University of Oregon 8 or so years back, when it was obvious that the game was rigged for the California team. It was no surprise that it moved up to the Pro games (or had been there for years by shaving but got really obvious lately).

I'll bet that he had some great 'sleepless' nights (parties) from the graft he got from throwing the game. He had to come up with something after the replays showed he threw the game, and they won't get rid of him, (or any of them), because 'they' know that if they need a fix, he's their man.

Just a symptom of the current culture, started in the 80's,(or earlier), get all you can, apologize rather than ask permission, and it's not illegal if you don't get caught!
)'(
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30 years since the 'Reagan Revolution'

Postby MinM » Thu Nov 04, 2010 7:57 pm

MinM wrote:This Day (November 4) in History:

Ex-NBA referee Donaghy released from jail - NBA News - FOX Sports on MSN

1 year anniversary of Obama election.

Michael Crichton died one year ago today.

14 years ago, Yitzhak Rabin was killed.

29 years ago, Ronald Reagan was elected.

125 years: Grover Cleveland

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