Billionaire Pedophile Jeffrey Epstein Goes Free

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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby Wombaticus Rex » Tue Jun 21, 2016 8:08 pm

Discussion about the latest Trump-related allegations is here: Trump accused of rape of 13-year old at Epstein party

A curious twist, seeing as how the subject of J. Epstein is basically Mutually Assured Destruction for both of the 2016 nominees. (One big happy family!)

I do wonder who's pushing this story.

Clear as day that Jeffrey Epstein is still very useful; otherwise Jeffrey Epstein would be very dead.
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Re: Trump accused of rape of 13-year old at Epstein party

Postby Nordic » Tue Jun 21, 2016 9:31 pm

And it seems she now has a lawyer albeit one whose specialty is intellectual property or something. Sorry I can't look it up right now.
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Re: Trump accused of rape of 13-year old at Epstein party

Postby stillrobertpaulsen » Wed Jun 22, 2016 4:14 pm

More info from Raw Story:

Jane Doe filed a similar suit in April in California, only to have it dismissed for improper paperwork—when the address affiliated with her name was found to be abandoned.

The woman’s new lawyer, Thomas Meagher, told the New York Daily News that the original suit was filed without the help of an attorney.
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby cptmarginal » Fri Oct 14, 2016 10:10 am

seemslikeadream » Thu Oct 13, 2016 7:07 pm wrote:
Todd Meister, Nicky Hilton's ex-husband who knows Epstein through his mega-rich dad and dishes in the book that Epstein (whom he calls a “yutz”) once bragged that he “liked to go into insane asylums because he liked to fuck crazy women.”




Image

Crime Writer James Patterson Is Obsessed With Jeffrey Epstein’s Penis

Best-selling author James Patterson digs into the dirt on Jeffrey Epstein in a massive and flawed new book.

Brandy Zadrozny


10.10.16 1:26 PM ET
The story of Jeffrey Epstein—a bizarre, self-described billionaire who bought his way out of trouble after police uncovered a sexual assault ring operating from his Florida mansion—has fascinated the public for over a decade. So it makes sense that best-selling uber-rich crime writer James Patterson is, like the rest of us, obsessed with the mystery of his Palm Beach neighbor.
And so, Patterson, the 69-year-old book mill owner and operator who holds the record for most No. 1 New York Times best sellers, has taken a rare swoop into nonfiction territory to give us Filthy Rich: The Shocking True Story of Jeffrey Epstein. As with most Patterson novels, Epstein’s tale is co-written—a generous characterization of the situation where Patterson employs dozens of ghostwriters and publishes their work under his brand—with John Connolly, a former New York police detective, Vanity Fair editor, and current Florida private eye, who (it has been rumored) at one time allegedly worked for the Church of Scientology.
Indeed, what is already known of Epstein, the massage-loving Icarus who flew too close to underage girls, is shocking. Dozens of profiles, hundreds of reported pieces, and thousands of pages of court documents have told the story of the man who worked for and socialized with New York’s wealthiest and most famous while surrounding himself with loyalists who either actively aided in his sexual assaults of postpubescent girls or kept his secrets.
Sadly, Filthy Rich has little to add to the canon.
Patterson’s 287-page book is organized into tiny—sometimes just single-page—chapters, bearing the subject’s name and a date. These early, smaller chapters are meant to create scenes in the lives of the victims, but provide less detail than one might get by googling. These tableaux show girls between 14 and 18, getting ready to meet Epstein, dodging their parents’ concerns, and conversations between them and the high-school classmate who acted as one of Epstein’s madams, luring girls to the mansion’s massage room. (Patterson writes in his author’s note that scenes and dialogue have been “recreated.”)
As detailed in the book, citing news reports covering the constellation of court cases that have spawned from his crimes, Epstein between the years 1998 and 2007 ran a kind of depraved pyramid scheme, paying young girls $200 (or more if they would “do more”) to give him sexual massages, and recruiting them to bring other young girls into the fold. These messages—which would occur up to three times a day, with different girls each time—were just a way to get high-school girls through the door, however. Once inside his room, a naked Epstein would grab them, masturbate, and sometimes penetrate them with his fingers, a vibrator, or his oddly-shaped penis, according to the girls.
Strangely, Epstein’s penis is the rare instance where the book is large on details. Lingering on his anatomy in several sections—calling it “egg-shaped,” “very tiny,” “some sort of birth defect,” “like a teardrop, like a drop of water ... really fat at the bottom and skinny at the top where it’s attached. And it never gets fully hard, ever.”
When police got wind of Epstein’s activities, they launched an investigation that led to a 53-page indictment. If convicted, Epstein was facing decades in prison, but he needn’t worry: A team of powerful and talented attorneys that included Alan Dershowitz and former Clinton special prosecutor Kenneth Starr launched an aggressive—and ultimately successful—campaign to discredit the prosecutors as well as the young victims. (Epstein recruited vulnerable girls from the wrong side of the tracks who were less likely to tell anyone about the assaults in exchange for modest sums of money and perks like car rentals and movie tickets, the book notes.)
U.S. Attorney Alex Acosta claimed the state didn’t stand a chance against Epstein’s legal dream team. “Our judgment in this case, based on the evidence known at the time, was that it was better to have a billionaire serve time in jail, register as a sex offender, and pay his victims restitution than risk a trial with a reduced likelihood of success,” he wrote in a 2011 letter, which Filthy Rich quotes in full.
In the end, Epstein would strike a slap-on-the-wrist deal with prosecutors that enraged local police. He’d pay settlements to dozens of accusers, but plead guilty to only one count of soliciting a minor. He served 13 months of an 18-month sentence in a Palm Beach county jail—16 hours of which every day but Sunday, he could spend at his home or in his office, due to a work release provision in the deal.
The book’s best chapters are its longer ones—but these are often just printed depositions, letters, police interviews, and court documents. News stories are quoted from liberally. Vicky Ward’s profile for Vanity Fair, as well as her explanation in The Daily Beast for why the most incriminating pieces were removed by her then-editor Graydon Carter, are among the published pieces examined at length.
In Part II, “The Man,” Patterson examines Epstein before his fall.
The 63-year-old was born to and raised by middle-class parents in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. A math whiz, Epstein was soon teaching at the Dalton School, a prestigious private prep school on New York’s Upper East Side. Through a parent at the school, Epstein parlayed the position into another, better-paying one at Bears Stearns where he worked on tax issues for ultra-wealthy clients. But he didn’t stay long; Epstein resigned during an insider trading investigation of Bear Stearns by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. From there, he collected rich clients, including the founder of The Limited Inc., Leslie Wexner, who some say gifted Epstein New York’s largest private residence. Exactly what he did for them is unknown. Maybe he had ties to the government? Maybe he fashioned tax shelters for his clients? If Patterson knows, he’s not telling.
Through philanthropy, Epstein opened his circle to academics and political giants—Nobel Prize winners, Stephen Hawking, and Bill Clinton are all counted as friends who visited Epstein’s private island in the Virgin Islands. Patterson uncovers no evidence that any were involved with Epstein’s criminal activity. And despite tabloid headlines, Filthy Rich, has nothing new on Epstein’s ties to Donald Trump, or Bill Clinton.
The original reporting is limited to brief interviews, including law enforcement officials; old Brooklyn friends who said Epstein always seemed like a nice Jewish boy to them; a former acquaintance who said Epstein used to lie about having money (he allegedly stole her friend’s Concorde jacket and would tell people he flew on the aircraft, “a total lie,”); and Todd Meister, Nicky Hilton's ex-husband who knows Epstein through his mega-rich dad and dishes in the book that Epstein (whom he calls a “yutz”) once bragged that he “liked to go into insane asylums because he liked to fuck crazy women.”

They also interviewed Anna Salter—a clinical psychologist (and, it goes unsaid, mystery novelist)—who has never met Epstein, but makes a few general statements about narcissism and psychopathy.
In almost every section of Filthy Rich, Patterson asks the reader questions—seemingly the same ones forming in his readers’ minds.
“Who is Jeffrey Epstein?” “How Did Jeffrey Epstein make all his money?” “Is Epstein a born psychopath?” “What exactly was he guilty of?”
Filthy Rich, one could assume, was a failed attempt to answer these questions.
“I thought it was a really powerful story, and I thought it needed to be told,” Patterson recently told The Wall Street Journal.
If only somebody would.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... penis.html


The ‘sex slave’ scandal that exposed pedophile billionaire Jeffrey Epstein

By Maureen Callahan October 9, 2016 | 7:08am

Modal Trigger The ‘sex slave’ scandal that exposed pedophile billionaire Jeffrey Epstein

Jeffrey Epstein denies allegations by underage girls who say they were lured to his Palm Beach mansion to give him "massages" in exchange for money. Photo: Splash News/AP


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In 2005, the world was introduced to reclusive billionaire Jeffrey Epstein, friend to princes and an American president, a power broker with the darkest of secrets: He was also a pedophile, accused of recruiting dozens of underage girls into a sex-slave network, buying their silence and moving along, although he has been convicted of only one count of soliciting prostitution from a minor. Visitors to his private Caribbean island, known as “Orgy Island,” have included Bill Clinton, Prince Andrew and Stephen Hawking.

According to a 2011 court filing by alleged Epstein victim Virginia Roberts Giuffre, she saw Clinton and Prince Andrew on the island but never saw the former president do anything improper. Giuffre has accused Prince Andrew of having sex with her when she was a minor, a charge Buckingham Palace denies.

“Epstein lives less than one mile away from me in Palm Beach,” author James Patterson tells The Post. In the 11 years since Epstein was investigated and charged by the Palm Beach police department, ultimately copping a plea and serving 13 months on one charge of soliciting prostitution from a 14-year-old girl, Patterson has remained obsessed with the case.



“He’s a fascinating character to read about,” Patterson says. “What is he thinking? Who is he?”

Patterson’s new book, “Filthy Rich: A Powerful Billionaire, the Sex Scandal That Undid Him, and All the Justice That Money Can Buy,” is an attempt to answer such questions. Co-authored with John Connolly and Tim Malloy, the book contains detailed police interviews with girls who alleged sexual abuse by Epstein and others in his circle. Giuffre alleged that Epstein’s ex-girlfriend Ghislaine Maxwell, daughter of the late media tycoon Robert Maxwell, abused her. Ghislaine Maxwell has denied allegations of enabling abuse.

Epstein has spent the bulk of his adult life cultivating relationships with the world’s most powerful men. Flight logs show that from 2001 to 2003, Bill Clinton flew on Epstein’s private plane, dubbed “The Lolita Express” by the press, 26 times. After Epstein’s arrest in July 2006, federal tax records show Epstein donated $25,000 to the Clinton Foundation that year.


Bill Clinton in 1994.Photo: AP
Epstein was also a regular visitor to Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago, and the two were friends. According to the Daily Mail, Trump was a frequent dinner guest at Epstein’s home, which was often full of barely dressed models. In 2003, New York magazine reported that Trump also attended a dinner party at Epstein’s honoring Bill Clinton.

Last year, The Guardian reported that Epstein’s “little black book” contained contact numbers for A-listers including Tony Blair, Naomi Campbell, Dustin Hoffman, Michael Bloomberg and Richard Branson.

In a 2006 court filing, Palm Beach police noted that a search of Epstein’s home uncovered two hidden cameras. The Mirror reported that in 2015, a 6-year-old civil lawsuit filed by “Jane Doe No. 3,” believed to be the now-married Giuffre, alleged that Epstein wired his mansion with hidden cameras, secretly recording orgies involving his prominent friends and underage girls. The ultimate purpose: blackmail, according to court papers.


Britain’s Prince Andrew in 2012Photo: AP
“Jane Doe No. 3” also alleged that she had been forced to have sex with “numerous prominent American politicians, powerful business executives, a well-known prime minister, and other world leaders.”

“We uncovered a lot of details about the police investigation and a lot about the girls, what happened to them, the effect on their lives,” Patterson says.

“The reader has to ask: Was justice done here or not?”

Epstein, now 63, has always been something of an international man of mystery. Born in Brooklyn, he had a middle-class upbringing: His father worked for the Parks Department, and his parents stressed hard work and education.

‘We uncovered a lot of details about the police investigation and a lot about the girls, what happened to them, the effect on their lives.’
- James Patterson
Epstein was brilliant, skipping two grades and graduating Lafayette High School in 1969. He attended Cooper Union but dropped out in 1971 and by 1973 was teaching calculus and physics at Dalton, where he tutored the son of a Bear Stearns exec. Soon, Epstein applied his facility with numbers on Wall Street but left Bear Stearns under a cloud in 1981. He formed his own business, J. Epstein & Co.

The bar for entry at the new firm was high. According to a 2002 profile in New York magazine, Epstein only took on clients who turned over $1 billion, at minimum, for him to manage. Clients also had to pay a flat fee and sign power of attorney over to Epstein, allowing him to do whatever he saw fit with their money.

Still, no one knew exactly what Epstein did, or how he was able to amass a personal billion-dollar-plus fortune. In addition to a block-long, nine-story mansion on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Epstein owns the $6.8 million mansion in Palm Beach, an $18 million property in New Mexico, the 70-acre private Caribbean island, a helicopter, a Gulfstream IV and a Boeing 727.

“My belief is that Jeff maintains some sort of money-management firm, though you won’t get a straight answer from him,” one high-level investor told New York magazine. “He once told me he had 300 people working for him, and I’ve also heard that he manages Rockefeller money. But one never knows. It’s like looking at the Wizard of Oz — there may be less there than meets the eye.”


Jeffrey Epstein’s Palm Beach homePhoto: Splash News
“He’s very enigmatic,” Rosa Monckton told Vanity Fair in 2003. Monckton was the former British CEO of Tiffany & Co. and confidante to the late Princess Diana. She was also a close friend of Epstein’s since the 1980s. “He never reveals his hand . . . He’s a classic iceberg. What you see is not what you get.”

Both profiles intimated that Epstein had a predilection for young women but never went further. In the New York magazine piece, Trump said Epstein’s self-professed image as a loner, an egghead and a teetotaler was not wholly accurate.


Donald Trump in 1990Photo: AP
“I’ve known Jeff for 15 years,” Trump said. “Terrific guy. He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side. No doubt about it — Jeffrey enjoys his social life.”

Three years after that profile ran, Palm Beach Police Officer Michele Pagan got a disturbing message. A woman reported that her 14-year-old stepdaughter confided to a friend that she’d had sex with an older man for money. The man’s name was Jeff, and he lived in a mansion on a cul-de-sac.

Pagan persuaded the woman to bring her stepdaughter down to be interviewed. In his book, Patterson calls the girl Mary. And Mary, like so many of the other girls who eventually talked, came from the little-known working-class areas surrounding Palm Beach.

A friend of a friend, Mary said, told her she could make hundreds of dollars in one hour, just for massaging some middle-aged guy’s feet. Lots of other girls had been doing it, some three times a week.

Mary claimed she had been driven to the mansion on El Brillo Way, where a female staffer escorted her up a pink-carpeted staircase, then into a room with a massage table, an armoire topped with sex toys and a photo of a little girl pulling her underwear off.


Ghislaine MaxwellPhoto: Getty Images
Epstein entered the room, wearing only a towel, Mary said.

“He took off the towel,” Mary told Pagan. “He was a really built guy. But his wee-wee was very tiny.”

Mary said Epstein got on the table and barked orders at her. She told police she was alone in the room with him, terrified.

Pagan wrote the following in her incident report:

“She removed her pants, leaving her thong panties on. She straddled his back, whereby her exposed buttocks were touching Epstein’s exposed buttocks. Epstein then turned to his side and started to rub his penis in an up-and-down motion. Epstein pulled out a purple vibrator and began to massage Mary’s vaginal area.”

Palm Beach assigned six more detectives to the investigation. They conducted a “trash pull” of Epstein’s garbage, sifting through paper with phone numbers, used condoms, toothbrushes, worn underwear. In one pull, police found a piece of paper with Mary’s phone number on it, along with the number of the person who recruited her.

On Sept. 11, 2005, detectives got another break. Alison, as she’s called in the book, told Detective Joe Recarey that she had been going to Epstein’s house since she was 16. Alison had been working at the Wellington Green Mall, saving up for a trip to Maine, when a friend told her, “You can get a plane ticket in two hours . . . We can go give this guy a massage and he’ll pay $200,” according to her statement to the police.

Alison told Recarey that she visited Epstein hundreds of times. She said he had bought her a new 2005 Dodge Neon, plane tickets, and gave her spending money. Alison said he even asked her to emancipate from her parents so she could live with him full-time as his “sex slave.”

She said Epstein slowly escalated his sexual requests, and despite Alison’s insistence that they never have intercourse, alleged, “This one time . . . he bent me over the table and put himself in me. Without my permission.”

Alison then asked if what Epstein had done to her was rape and spoke of her abject fear of him.

An abridged version of her witness statement, as recounted in the book:

Alison: Before I say anything else . . . um, is there a possibility that I’m gonna have to go to court or anything?
Recarey: I mean, what he did to you is a crime. I’m not gonna lie to you.
Alison: Would you consider it rape, what he did?
Recarey: If he put himself inside you without permission . . . That, that is a crime. That is a crime.
Alison: I don’t want my family to find out about this . . . ’Cause Jeffrey’s gonna get me. You guys realize that, right? . . . I’m not safe now. I’m not safe.
Recarey: Why do you say you’re not safe? Has he said he’s hurt people before?
Alison: Well, I’ve heard him make threats to people on the telephone, yeah. Of course.
Recarey: You’re gonna die? You’re gonna break your legs? Or —
Alison: All of the above!

Alison also told Recarey that Epstein got so violent with her that he ripped out her hair and threw her around. “I mean,” she said, “there’s been nights that I walked out of there barely able to walk, um, from him being so rough.”

Two months later, Recarey interviewed Epstein’s former house manager of 11 years, documented in his probable-cause affidavit as Mr. Alessi. “Alessi stated Epstein receives three massages a day . . . towards the end of his employment, the masseuses . . . appeared to be 16 or 17 years of age at the most . . . [Alessi] would have to wash off a massager/vibrator and a long rubber penis, which were in the sink after the massage.”

Another house manager, Alfredo Rodriguez, told Recarey that very young girls were giving Epstein massages at least twice a day, and in one instance, Epstein had Rodriguez deliver one dozen roses to Mary, at her high school.

In May 2006, the Palm Beach Police Department filed a probable-cause affidavit, asking prosecutors to charge Epstein with four counts of unlawful sexual activity with a minor — a second-degree felony — and one count of lewd and lascivious molestation of a 14-year-old minor, also a second-degree felony.

Today, Jeffrey Epstein is a free man, albeit one who routinely settles civil lawsuits against him, brought by young women, out of court.
Palm Beach prosecutors said the evidence was weak, and after presenting the case to a grand jury, Epstein was charged with only one count of felony solicitation of prostitution. In 2008, he pleaded guilty and nominally served 13 months of an 18-month sentence in a county jail: Epstein spent one day a week there, the other six out on “work release.”

Today, Jeffrey Epstein is a free man, albeit one who routinely settles civil lawsuits against him, brought by young women, out of court. As of 2015, Epstein had settled multiple such cases.

Giuffre has sued Ghislaine Maxwell in Manhattan federal court, charging defamation — saying Maxwell stated Giuffre lied about Maxwell’s recruitment of her and other underage girls. Epstein has been called upon to testify in court this month, on Oct. 20.

The true number of Epstein’s victims may never be known.

He will be a registered sex offender for the rest of his life, not that it fazes him.

“I’m not a sexual predator, I’m an ‘offender,’ ” Epstein told The Post in 2011. “It’s the difference between a murderer and a person who steals a bagel.”

http://nypost.com/2016/10/09/the-sex-sl ... y-epstein/


(cross-posting before commenting)
The new way of thinking is precisely delineated by what it is not.
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby cptmarginal » Fri Oct 14, 2016 10:14 am

Best-selling author James Patterson digs into the dirt on Jeffrey Epstein in a massive and flawed new book.

...

Patterson’s 287-page book [...] The book’s best chapters are its longer ones—but these are often just printed depositions, letters, police interviews, and court documents. News stories are quoted from liberally.


I'll pass... My idea of "massive" is Alan Moore's Jerusalem.

From there, he collected rich clients, including the founder of The Limited Inc., Leslie Wexner, who some say gifted Epstein New York’s largest private residence. Exactly what he did for them is unknown. Maybe he had ties to the government? Maybe he fashioned tax shelters for his clients? If Patterson knows, he’s not telling.


Nobody will touch the offshore money angle with a ten-foot pole.

Anyway, this caught my eye:

As with most Patterson novels, Epstein’s tale is co-written—a generous characterization of the situation where Patterson employs dozens of ghostwriters and publishes their work under his brand—with John Connolly, a former New York police detective, Vanity Fair editor, and current Florida private eye, who (it has been rumored) at one time allegedly worked for the Church of Scientology.


Was a Vanity Fair Editor Secretly Working for the Church of Scientology? - By John Cook • 03/01/11

And, uh... *cough*

The Scientology Conspiracy Theory About Two Artists' "Golden Suicides" - Andy Cush 03/18/15
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby tapitsbo » Sun Dec 18, 2016 2:31 pm





Someone sent me this episode of the same show, which features discussion the bizarre police video of Epstein's mansion
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby Project Willow » Sat Jan 28, 2017 6:33 pm

Jane Doe #43 files lawsuit:

http://archive.is/mrnTZ
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby seemslikeadream » Sat Jan 28, 2017 6:37 pm

thanks

David Boies :thumbsup
Mazars and Deutsche Bank could have ended this nightmare before it started.
They could still get him out of office.
But instead, they want mass death.
Don’t forget that.
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby American Dream » Fri Mar 10, 2017 4:07 pm

Cross-posting from The “Alternative Right":

Mike Cernovich, Alan Dershowitz and the Jeffery Epstein Underage Sex Trafficking Case

Image

Unredacted information on the court document included the case number, 1:15-cv-07433-RWS. This case is better known as Giuffre V. Maxwell, and is a suit filed by a woman named Virginia Giuffre against British heiress Ghislane Maxwell, alleging that Maxwell acted as a facilitator and groomer for Jeffrey Epstein’s child prostitution enterprise, and that Maxwell was directly responsible for trafficking the then-underage Giuffre as an unwilling prostitute.

Cernovich inserted himself into this case in January of 2017 when he made a motion to intervene and a motion to unseal previously sealed court documents and exhibits in this case. Cernovich’s claim is that his motion to unseal these items is a purely journalistic investigation, and that it was part of his “quest” to oppose pedophiles. This is, apparently, not the case.

It is then with no small amount of irony that we note that Cernovich’s motion was aimed against Giuffre, not on her behalf.

According to the response in opposition to Cernovich’s motion to unseal, documents filed by Giuffre’s attorneys state that Cernovich is attempting to unseal documents that were sealed under an order intended to protect Giuffre. The opposition documents further state that Cernovich’s motion to unseal mirrored earlier motions to unseal filed by celebrity attorney and close personal friend Alan Dershowitz– who is also named as being involved with Epstein’s sex ring– and that Cernovich is acting as Dershowitz’s proxy. They also noted how Cernovich has been a pro-rape advocate, often using rhetoric favoring the targeting of rape victims, as well as Cernovich’s relationship with Dershowitz, most notably Dershowitz’s appearance in Cernovich’s movie “Silenced”.


Read at: http://idavox.com/index.php/2017/03/09/ ... cking-case



ON EDIT: Corrected link
Last edited by American Dream on Fri Mar 10, 2017 11:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby seemslikeadream » Fri Mar 24, 2017 7:52 pm

Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002. The president is now on the witness list in the Florida court battle over how federal prosecutors handled the allegations against Epstein. But lawyers said it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case


Trump's Labor Secretary nominee faces questions over why he cut a deal with pedophile billionaire Jeffrey Epstein instead of indicting him on federal sex crimes
Alexander Acosta is facing questions over plea deal he oversaw for pedophile
Billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison
Lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is this week, cut deal with Epstein a decade ago instead of pursuing a federal indictment
Acosta defended decisions as best outcome given evidence available at the time
By Dailymail.com Reporter and Associated Press
PUBLISHED: 01:47 EDT, 22 March 2017 | UPDATED: 11:18 EDT, 22 March 2017

President Donald Trump's labor secretary nominee is facing questions over the unusual plea deal he oversaw for billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, while serving as US attorney in Miami.

Alexander Acosta made a deal with Epstein which meant he avoided federal prosecution and a potential life prison sentence when he was found guilty of soliciting prostitution in 2008.

He is now at the center of a lawsuit, which names President Donald Trump as a witness, which accuses him of mishandling the case a decade ago.

Critics, including attorneys for some underage victims of financier Epstein, claim the plea agreement was a 'sweetheart deal' made possible only by Epstein's wealth, connections and high-powered lawyers.

The story resurfaced just hours before his confirmation hearing for the secretary of labor was set to start.
Image
President Donald Trump's labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta (pictured) is facing questions over the unusual plea deal he oversaw for billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, while serving as US attorney in Miami
+4
President Donald Trump's labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta (pictured) is facing questions over the unusual plea deal he oversaw for billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, while serving as US attorney in Miami
Image
The lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is scheduled to begin Wednesday, cut a deal with Jeffrey Epstein (pictured) 10 years ago rather than pursuing a federal indictment
+4
The lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is scheduled to begin Wednesday, cut a deal with Jeffrey Epstein (pictured) 10 years ago rather than pursuing a federal indictment

Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002, saying that 'he's a lot of fun to be with', adding that 'he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side', according to the Washington Post.

Lawyers told the Post that it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case.

The lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is scheduled to begin Wednesday, cut a deal with Epstein 10 years ago rather than pursuing a federal indictment, according to the Tribune.

Sen Patty Murray, the leading Democrat on the committee, said in a statement that she met with Acosta and is concerned about whether he would 'stand up to political pressure' and advocate for workers as labor secretary.

Acosta has defended his decisions as the best outcome given evidence available at the time.


'Some may feel that the prosecution should have been tougher. Evidence that has come to light since 2007 may encourage that view,' Acosta wrote in a March 2011 letter to media outlets after leaving the US attorney's office.

'Had these additional statements and evidence been known, the outcome may have been different. But they were not known to us at the time.'

Unlike Trump's original choice for labor secretary, Andrew Puzder, Acosta is expected to win confirmation.

The Florida International University law school dean was nominated after Puzder, a fast-food executive, withdrew over his hiring of an undocumented immigrant housekeeper and other issues.
Image
Acosta, 48, has previously won Senate confirmation as Miami US attorney, head of the Justice Department's civil rights division and the National Labor Relations Board.

Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002. The president is now on the witness list in the Florida court battle over how federal prosecutors handled the allegations against Epstein. But lawyers said it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case
+4
Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002. The president is now on the witness list in the Florida court battle over how federal prosecutors handled the allegations against Epstein. But lawyers said it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case

He declined comment when asked about the Epstein case this week.

Epstein, now 64, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison, of which he served 13 months.

He was also required to register as a sex offender and pay millions of dollars in restitution to as many as 40 victims who were between the ages of 13 and 17 when the crimes occurred.

According to court documents, Epstein paid underage girls for sex, sexual massages and similar acts at a Palm Beach mansion he then owned as well as properties in New York, the US Virgin Islands and New Mexico.

Prosecutors say he had a team of employees to identify girls as potential targets.

After an investigation by local police, Palm Beach prosecutors decided to charge Epstein with aggravated assault, which would have meant no jail time, no requirement that he register as a sex offender and no guaranteed restitution for victims.

Unhappy local investigators went to Acosta's office, which opened a federal probe and eventually drafted a proposed 53-page indictment that could have resulted in a sentence of 10 years to life in prison for Epstein, if convicted.

With that as leverage, a deal was worked out for Epstein to plead guilty to state prostitution solicitation charges and the federal indictment was shelved.

Acosta has defended his decisions as the best outcome given evidence available at the time. 'Some may feel that the prosecution should have been tougher. Evidence that has come to light since 2007 may encourage that view,' Acosta wrote in a March 2011 letter
Jeffrey Epstein
Acosta has defended his decisions as the best outcome given evidence available at the time. 'Some may feel that the prosecution should have been tougher. Evidence that has come to light since 2007 may encourage that view,' Acosta wrote in a March 2011 letter

It didn't stop there. Epstein's lawyers worked out an unusual and secret 'non-prosecution agreement' to guarantee neither Epstein nor his employees would ever face federal charges.

'This agreement will not be made part of any public record,' the deal between Epstein and Acosta says, according to the Tribune. The document was unsealed by a federal judge in a civil lawsuit in 2015.

In his 2011 letter, Acosta defended his decisions as the best possible outcome.

'Our judgment in this case, based on the evidence that was known at the time, was that it was better to have a billionaire serve time in jail, register as a sex offender and pay his victims restitution than risk a trial with a reduced likelihood of success,' Acosta wrote.

'I supported that judgment then, and based on the state of the law as it then stood and the evidence known at the time, I would support that judgment again.'

In the letter, Acosta acknowledged that 'some prosecutors felt that we should just go to trial, and at times I felt that frustration myself.'

Epstein, now 64, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison, of which he served 13 months
+4
Epstein, now 64, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison, of which he served 13 months

He said that Epstein 'received highly unusual treatment while in jail,' including being allowed to serve much of his sentence in the county jail rather than a state prison, and being permitted to leave the jail six days a week to work at home before returning to jail to sleep, according to the Tribune.

'The treatment that he received while in state custody undermined the purpose of a jail sentence,' Acosta said.

Well-known Miami defense lawyer Joel DeFabio, who has represented numerous defendants in sex cases, said he had never heard of such an agreement before Epstein's came to light.

DeFabio said he has had clients with far less egregious sex charges — and far less wealth — who were sentenced to 10 or 15 years behind bars. DeFabio tried to use the Epstein case to argue for more lenient sentences.

'There still has been no clear explanation as to why Epstein received such preferential treatment,' DeFabio said. 'This thing just stinks. The elite take care of their own.'

The non-prosecution agreement became public in a related civil case, leading two Epstein victims — identified only as Jane Does No. 1 and 2, to file a victims' rights lawsuit claiming they were improperly left in the dark about the deal. The lawsuit, which is still pending, seeks to reopen the case to expose the details and possibly nullify the agreement.

Other victims have come forward, including one woman who claimed as a teenager that Epstein flew her around the world for sexual escapades, including encounters with Britain's Prince Andrew. Buckingham Palace has vehemently denied those claims.

The Justice Department's position in the victims' rights lawsuit is that since no federal indictment was ever filed, the victims were not entitled to notification about the non-prosecution agreement. Settlement talks last fall went nowhere.

'There will not be a settlement. That case will eventually get to trial,' said Bradley Edwards, attorney for the two Jane Doe victims.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z4cGuqtlPq


SAY WHAT?
Trump Nominee: Lax Deal for Billionaire Pedo Jeffrey Epstein Was ‘A Good Thing’
Trump’s labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta defended his record as a U.S. Attorney and his secret non-prosecution deal with perverted billionaire and Trump pal, Jeffrey Epstein.
Brandy Zadrozny

03.22.17 12:20 PM ET

Image
At his senate confirmation hearing Wednesday morning, labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta generally described the secret non-prosecution deal he oversaw as U.S. Attorney with billionaire pedophile Jeffrey Epstein as “a good thing.”
According to law enforcement officials and alleged victims, between the years 1998 and 2007, financier and playboy Jeffrey Epstein—who socialized with the likes of Donald Trump and Bill Clinton—ran a kind of sexual pyramid scheme in Florida, New York, and on his private island in the U.S. Virgin Islands where he paid minors as young as 13 years old to perform sexual massages and recruit other girls for the same. Police eventually caught up with Epstein—after his alleged serial abuse of some 50 girls—but a secret agreement with federal prosecutors, overseen by Acosta, resulted in an unusual sentence that critics, including the alleged victims and local police, felt was far too lenient and allowed a member of the rich elite to evade appropriate punishment for his crimes.
After a round of questions from senators about overtime, worker protections, department budgets, and job training, Democratic senator Tim Kaine got right to it on Wednesday, pulling out a recent Washington Post story that rehashed all of the Epstein ugliness.
Asked whether he had worked to keep the plea deal quiet, and whether he declined to indict Epstein on federal charges despite his own office’s desire to do so, Acosta said, “That is not accurate.”
Acosta went on to say that a difficulty in the Department of Justice is that it “does not litigate in the public record or the media, but in court.” Acosta said that Epstein case was originally a state matter and disputed the notion that he hadn’t acted aggressively, noting that had he not stepped in, Epstein could have been charged even more leniently under a local grand jury.
“The grand jury in Palm beach county recommended a single count which would have resulted in zero jail time, zero registration as a sex offender and zero restitution.”
Declining to discuss specifics of the Epstein case, Acosta called his office’s sealing of the draft indictment “pretty typical,” and defended the deal in general terms.
“At the end of the day, based on the evidence, professionals within a prosecutor’s office decide that a plea that guarantees someone goes to jail, that guarantees he register generally, and guarantees other outcomes is a good thing.”
“That was a broadly held decision,” Acosta said.

Police in Palm Beach County, Florida arrested Epstein in 2008, after a months-long investigation that included stakeouts and interviews of local girls whom they determined to be victims. They took that evidence to prosecutors and suggested the billionaire be charged with several felonies, including lewd and lascivious molestation and multiple counts of unlawful sexual activity with a minor. If federal prosecutors had charged him according to police suggestions, the man with a little black book full of princes, presidents, and prime ministers could have faced 15 years in prison.
But after a meeting with Epstein’s high-priced and high-powered lawyers, including Gerald Lefcourt and Alan Dershowitz—who defended their client by reportedly having witnesses followed and discrediting alleged victims by offering their social media profiles as evidence that they weren’t as innocent as they claimed to be—state prosecutors recommended that Epstein be charged with a single misdemeanor. In response, the Palm Beach police chief wrote a letter to the Department of Justice asking that it step in.
It seemed to have little effect.

As an U.S. Attorney, Alex Acosta did get involved, but as he claimed in a 2011 letter, the state had been outmatched by Epstein, whose attorneys launched "a year-long assault" on prosecutors “more aggressive” than any Acosta had previously encountered.
“Our judgment in this case, based on the evidence known at the time, was that it was better to have a billionaire serve time in jail, register as a sex offender, and pay his victims restitution than risk a trial with a reduced likelihood of success,” he wrote in the letter.
In the end, Epstein paid settlements to dozens of accusers, and plead guilty to a single count of soliciting a minor. He served 13 months of an 18-month sentence in a Palm Beach county jail instead of state prison—16 hours of which, on every day but Sunday, he could spend at his home or in his office, due to a work release provision in the deal. Since 2008, Epstein has quietly paid settlements to scores of his alleged victims, and must register as a sex offender for life. Meanwhile, the women who allegedly procured girls for Epstein, referred to as “potential co-conspirators,” in the non-prosecution agreement, also received immunity from prosecution.
In the same 2011 letter, Acosta conceded that the work release and county jail location of his state sentence seemed like "highly unusual treatment" that "undermined the purpose of a jail sentence."
In 2016, several of Epstein’s alleged victims decried the plea deal, filing a civil lawsuit against the federal government and alleging Acosta’s office had violated their rights as victims by not notifying them of the secret agreement. The two sides have been in settlement talks since last summer, according to court documents. Brad Edwards, the attorney on behalf of the Jane Does, declined to comment on Acosta when reached by The Daily Beast, but has suggested he hopes the government will admit wrongdoing or perhaps pay a fine to resolve the case.
Federal prosecutors did offer some additional insight into Acosta’s decision during a 2015 hearing, were Assistant U.S. Attorney Dexter Lee suggested the alleged victims may have complicated any prosecution by the fact that they in turn became recruiters—finding additional victims, Lee said, for Epstein’s pyramid scheme in exchange for money.
"Your Honor, we believe there's an issue about whether or not Jane Does 1 and 2 may have been complicit in the offenses,” Lee said. “Specifically, that they themselves procured additional young women for Mr. Epstein and were paid commissions or referral fees for it.”
Epstein wasn’t the only scandal the labor secretary nominee was asked to address on Wednesday.
Senator Patty Murray questioned Acosta on his time as head of the civil rights division of the Department of Justice during the Bush administration between 2003 and 2005. During his tenure, the Department of Justice Inspector General found he relied on a subordinate, Bradley Schlozman, to make hiring decisions. Under Acosta’s watch, Schlozman illegally sought to purge liberal attorneys in favor of hiring more conservative, “real Americans” (as Schlozman put it). The Inspector General report never implicated Acosta himself in the department's politicization, but did determine he “took no action to investigate, bring the matter to the attention of their supervisors, or change Schlozman’s role in hiring for the Division.”
On that controversy, Acosta had little defense.
“That conduct should have never happened,” Acosta answered. “I deeply regret it.”
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... thing.html


President Trump on Witness List in Case Involving Pedophile Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein
by Rachel Stockman | 5:46 pm, March 14th, 2017

President Donald Trump is on the witness list for a civil trial, involving a Florida attorney, who represents convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein‘s alleged victims, and the disgraced billionaire himself.

“President Donald Trump has been identified as an individual who may have information relating to these allegations,” attorney Jack Scarola told LawNewz.com in an interview. Scarola is representing attorney Bradley Edwards, a party in the case.

Scarola told LawNewz.com that they have evidence that at least one of the now (former) employees at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club were recruited by Epstein’s agent to become involved in a pattern of alleged molestations.

The civil trial, which is expected to begin soon, is a complicated one and dates back to 2009. It involves allegations of malicious prosecution, and defamation filed by Florida attorney Bradley Edwards. Edwards also represents several of Epstein’s alleged victims who brought separate civil cases against Epstein. But, what is particularly interesting about this latest case is that it now appears to involve President Donald Trump himself.

In 2007, federal prosecutors, ironically under the leadership of Trump’s current Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta (who was a U.S. Attorney at the time), quietly entered into a secret non-prosecution agreement with the billionaire which ensured that Epstein and his ‘co-conspirators’ would not be prosecuted federally in exchange for Epstein’s guilty plea to state charges. Basically, Epstein got a slap on the wrist and served 13 months in a Florida prison and home detention for solicitation and procurement of minors for prostitution .

Court records in the civil case claim that Epstein repeatedly sexually assaulted more than 40 young girls on numerous occasions between 2002 and 2005 at his mansion in West Palm Beach, Florida.

While there is no evidence that Trump was involved in Epstein’s scheme, Bradley’s attorneys claim that “Trump and Epstein have acknowledged that they were friends, that they have socialized together. We have reason to believe that Trump was a guest in Epstein’s home during the period of time that Epstein was engaged in molestation.”

Trump is included on a witness list filed on August 31, 2016 along with Bill Richardson, the former governor of New Mexico.

In Bradley Edwards’ affidavit filed in support of the civil case, he claims that Mark Epstein (Jeffrey Epstein’s brother) testified that Trump flew on Jeffrey Epstein’s plane with him (the same plane where multiple young girls say they used to have sex.) Former President Bill Clinton is also said to have flown on that same plane.

“Epstein’s phone directory from his computer contains 14 phone numbers for Donald Trump, including emergency numbers, car numbers, and numbers to Trump’s security guard and houseman,” the affidavit claims.

“The likelihood is very low that he is deposed or called as a witness at trial,” Scarola explained in a story first reported by The Florida Bulldog, an investigative nonprofit. “There are, as you might imagine, substantial hurdles in calling a sitting U.S president and we don’t want any further delays on this case.”

The civil trial has been delayed several times, and a judge is expected to set a trial date shortly. We’ve reached out to Trump’s personal attorney for comment, and will update the story if we hear back.

This post has been updated to include a link to the Florida Bulldog website.
http://lawnewz.com/uncategorized/presid ... y-epstein/
Mazars and Deutsche Bank could have ended this nightmare before it started.
They could still get him out of office.
But instead, they want mass death.
Don’t forget that.
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Re: Trump accused of rape of 13-year old at Epstein party

Postby stefano » Wed Mar 29, 2017 10:49 am

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Re: Trump accused of rape of 13-year old at Epstein party

Postby seemslikeadream » Wed Mar 29, 2017 10:54 am

this bump needs this update :)


all those bumps and only 2 are my OPs ....am I the only one obsessed?
seemslikeadream » Fri Mar 24, 2017 6:52 pm wrote:Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002. The president is now on the witness list in the Florida court battle over how federal prosecutors handled the allegations against Epstein. But lawyers said it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case


Trump's Labor Secretary nominee faces questions over why he cut a deal with pedophile billionaire Jeffrey Epstein instead of indicting him on federal sex crimes
Alexander Acosta is facing questions over plea deal he oversaw for pedophile
Billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison
Lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is this week, cut deal with Epstein a decade ago instead of pursuing a federal indictment
Acosta defended decisions as best outcome given evidence available at the time
By Dailymail.com Reporter and Associated Press
PUBLISHED: 01:47 EDT, 22 March 2017 | UPDATED: 11:18 EDT, 22 March 2017

President Donald Trump's labor secretary nominee is facing questions over the unusual plea deal he oversaw for billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, while serving as US attorney in Miami.

Alexander Acosta made a deal with Epstein which meant he avoided federal prosecution and a potential life prison sentence when he was found guilty of soliciting prostitution in 2008.

He is now at the center of a lawsuit, which names President Donald Trump as a witness, which accuses him of mishandling the case a decade ago.

Critics, including attorneys for some underage victims of financier Epstein, claim the plea agreement was a 'sweetheart deal' made possible only by Epstein's wealth, connections and high-powered lawyers.

The story resurfaced just hours before his confirmation hearing for the secretary of labor was set to start.
Image
President Donald Trump's labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta (pictured) is facing questions over the unusual plea deal he oversaw for billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, while serving as US attorney in Miami
+4
President Donald Trump's labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta (pictured) is facing questions over the unusual plea deal he oversaw for billionaire sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, while serving as US attorney in Miami
Image
The lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is scheduled to begin Wednesday, cut a deal with Jeffrey Epstein (pictured) 10 years ago rather than pursuing a federal indictment
+4
The lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is scheduled to begin Wednesday, cut a deal with Jeffrey Epstein (pictured) 10 years ago rather than pursuing a federal indictment

Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002, saying that 'he's a lot of fun to be with', adding that 'he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side', according to the Washington Post.

Lawyers told the Post that it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case.

The lawsuit questions why Acosta, whose confirmation hearing is scheduled to begin Wednesday, cut a deal with Epstein 10 years ago rather than pursuing a federal indictment, according to the Tribune.

Sen Patty Murray, the leading Democrat on the committee, said in a statement that she met with Acosta and is concerned about whether he would 'stand up to political pressure' and advocate for workers as labor secretary.

Acosta has defended his decisions as the best outcome given evidence available at the time.


'Some may feel that the prosecution should have been tougher. Evidence that has come to light since 2007 may encourage that view,' Acosta wrote in a March 2011 letter to media outlets after leaving the US attorney's office.

'Had these additional statements and evidence been known, the outcome may have been different. But they were not known to us at the time.'

Unlike Trump's original choice for labor secretary, Andrew Puzder, Acosta is expected to win confirmation.

The Florida International University law school dean was nominated after Puzder, a fast-food executive, withdrew over his hiring of an undocumented immigrant housekeeper and other issues.
Image
Acosta, 48, has previously won Senate confirmation as Miami US attorney, head of the Justice Department's civil rights division and the National Labor Relations Board.

Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002. The president is now on the witness list in the Florida court battle over how federal prosecutors handled the allegations against Epstein. But lawyers said it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case
+4
Trump once called Epstein a 'terrific guy' in 2002. The president is now on the witness list in the Florida court battle over how federal prosecutors handled the allegations against Epstein. But lawyers said it's very unlikely Trump will be required to testify in the case

He declined comment when asked about the Epstein case this week.

Epstein, now 64, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison, of which he served 13 months.

He was also required to register as a sex offender and pay millions of dollars in restitution to as many as 40 victims who were between the ages of 13 and 17 when the crimes occurred.

According to court documents, Epstein paid underage girls for sex, sexual massages and similar acts at a Palm Beach mansion he then owned as well as properties in New York, the US Virgin Islands and New Mexico.

Prosecutors say he had a team of employees to identify girls as potential targets.

After an investigation by local police, Palm Beach prosecutors decided to charge Epstein with aggravated assault, which would have meant no jail time, no requirement that he register as a sex offender and no guaranteed restitution for victims.

Unhappy local investigators went to Acosta's office, which opened a federal probe and eventually drafted a proposed 53-page indictment that could have resulted in a sentence of 10 years to life in prison for Epstein, if convicted.

With that as leverage, a deal was worked out for Epstein to plead guilty to state prostitution solicitation charges and the federal indictment was shelved.

Acosta has defended his decisions as the best outcome given evidence available at the time. 'Some may feel that the prosecution should have been tougher. Evidence that has come to light since 2007 may encourage that view,' Acosta wrote in a March 2011 letter
Jeffrey Epstein
Acosta has defended his decisions as the best outcome given evidence available at the time. 'Some may feel that the prosecution should have been tougher. Evidence that has come to light since 2007 may encourage that view,' Acosta wrote in a March 2011 letter

It didn't stop there. Epstein's lawyers worked out an unusual and secret 'non-prosecution agreement' to guarantee neither Epstein nor his employees would ever face federal charges.

'This agreement will not be made part of any public record,' the deal between Epstein and Acosta says, according to the Tribune. The document was unsealed by a federal judge in a civil lawsuit in 2015.

In his 2011 letter, Acosta defended his decisions as the best possible outcome.

'Our judgment in this case, based on the evidence that was known at the time, was that it was better to have a billionaire serve time in jail, register as a sex offender and pay his victims restitution than risk a trial with a reduced likelihood of success,' Acosta wrote.

'I supported that judgment then, and based on the state of the law as it then stood and the evidence known at the time, I would support that judgment again.'

In the letter, Acosta acknowledged that 'some prosecutors felt that we should just go to trial, and at times I felt that frustration myself.'

Epstein, now 64, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison, of which he served 13 months
+4
Epstein, now 64, pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida charges of soliciting prostitution and was sentenced to 18 months in prison, of which he served 13 months

He said that Epstein 'received highly unusual treatment while in jail,' including being allowed to serve much of his sentence in the county jail rather than a state prison, and being permitted to leave the jail six days a week to work at home before returning to jail to sleep, according to the Tribune.

'The treatment that he received while in state custody undermined the purpose of a jail sentence,' Acosta said.

Well-known Miami defense lawyer Joel DeFabio, who has represented numerous defendants in sex cases, said he had never heard of such an agreement before Epstein's came to light.

DeFabio said he has had clients with far less egregious sex charges — and far less wealth — who were sentenced to 10 or 15 years behind bars. DeFabio tried to use the Epstein case to argue for more lenient sentences.

'There still has been no clear explanation as to why Epstein received such preferential treatment,' DeFabio said. 'This thing just stinks. The elite take care of their own.'

The non-prosecution agreement became public in a related civil case, leading two Epstein victims — identified only as Jane Does No. 1 and 2, to file a victims' rights lawsuit claiming they were improperly left in the dark about the deal. The lawsuit, which is still pending, seeks to reopen the case to expose the details and possibly nullify the agreement.

Other victims have come forward, including one woman who claimed as a teenager that Epstein flew her around the world for sexual escapades, including encounters with Britain's Prince Andrew. Buckingham Palace has vehemently denied those claims.

The Justice Department's position in the victims' rights lawsuit is that since no federal indictment was ever filed, the victims were not entitled to notification about the non-prosecution agreement. Settlement talks last fall went nowhere.

'There will not be a settlement. That case will eventually get to trial,' said Bradley Edwards, attorney for the two Jane Doe victims.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z4cGuqtlPq


SAY WHAT?
Trump Nominee: Lax Deal for Billionaire Pedo Jeffrey Epstein Was ‘A Good Thing’
Trump’s labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta defended his record as a U.S. Attorney and his secret non-prosecution deal with perverted billionaire and Trump pal, Jeffrey Epstein.
Brandy Zadrozny

03.22.17 12:20 PM ET

Image
At his senate confirmation hearing Wednesday morning, labor secretary nominee Alexander Acosta generally described the secret non-prosecution deal he oversaw as U.S. Attorney with billionaire pedophile Jeffrey Epstein as “a good thing.”
According to law enforcement officials and alleged victims, between the years 1998 and 2007, financier and playboy Jeffrey Epstein—who socialized with the likes of Donald Trump and Bill Clinton—ran a kind of sexual pyramid scheme in Florida, New York, and on his private island in the U.S. Virgin Islands where he paid minors as young as 13 years old to perform sexual massages and recruit other girls for the same. Police eventually caught up with Epstein—after his alleged serial abuse of some 50 girls—but a secret agreement with federal prosecutors, overseen by Acosta, resulted in an unusual sentence that critics, including the alleged victims and local police, felt was far too lenient and allowed a member of the rich elite to evade appropriate punishment for his crimes.
After a round of questions from senators about overtime, worker protections, department budgets, and job training, Democratic senator Tim Kaine got right to it on Wednesday, pulling out a recent Washington Post story that rehashed all of the Epstein ugliness.
Asked whether he had worked to keep the plea deal quiet, and whether he declined to indict Epstein on federal charges despite his own office’s desire to do so, Acosta said, “That is not accurate.”
Acosta went on to say that a difficulty in the Department of Justice is that it “does not litigate in the public record or the media, but in court.” Acosta said that Epstein case was originally a state matter and disputed the notion that he hadn’t acted aggressively, noting that had he not stepped in, Epstein could have been charged even more leniently under a local grand jury.
“The grand jury in Palm beach county recommended a single count which would have resulted in zero jail time, zero registration as a sex offender and zero restitution.”
Declining to discuss specifics of the Epstein case, Acosta called his office’s sealing of the draft indictment “pretty typical,” and defended the deal in general terms.
“At the end of the day, based on the evidence, professionals within a prosecutor’s office decide that a plea that guarantees someone goes to jail, that guarantees he register generally, and guarantees other outcomes is a good thing.”
“That was a broadly held decision,” Acosta said.

Police in Palm Beach County, Florida arrested Epstein in 2008, after a months-long investigation that included stakeouts and interviews of local girls whom they determined to be victims. They took that evidence to prosecutors and suggested the billionaire be charged with several felonies, including lewd and lascivious molestation and multiple counts of unlawful sexual activity with a minor. If federal prosecutors had charged him according to police suggestions, the man with a little black book full of princes, presidents, and prime ministers could have faced 15 years in prison.
But after a meeting with Epstein’s high-priced and high-powered lawyers, including Gerald Lefcourt and Alan Dershowitz—who defended their client by reportedly having witnesses followed and discrediting alleged victims by offering their social media profiles as evidence that they weren’t as innocent as they claimed to be—state prosecutors recommended that Epstein be charged with a single misdemeanor. In response, the Palm Beach police chief wrote a letter to the Department of Justice asking that it step in.
It seemed to have little effect.

As an U.S. Attorney, Alex Acosta did get involved, but as he claimed in a 2011 letter, the state had been outmatched by Epstein, whose attorneys launched "a year-long assault" on prosecutors “more aggressive” than any Acosta had previously encountered.
“Our judgment in this case, based on the evidence known at the time, was that it was better to have a billionaire serve time in jail, register as a sex offender, and pay his victims restitution than risk a trial with a reduced likelihood of success,” he wrote in the letter.
In the end, Epstein paid settlements to dozens of accusers, and plead guilty to a single count of soliciting a minor. He served 13 months of an 18-month sentence in a Palm Beach county jail instead of state prison—16 hours of which, on every day but Sunday, he could spend at his home or in his office, due to a work release provision in the deal. Since 2008, Epstein has quietly paid settlements to scores of his alleged victims, and must register as a sex offender for life. Meanwhile, the women who allegedly procured girls for Epstein, referred to as “potential co-conspirators,” in the non-prosecution agreement, also received immunity from prosecution.
In the same 2011 letter, Acosta conceded that the work release and county jail location of his state sentence seemed like "highly unusual treatment" that "undermined the purpose of a jail sentence."
In 2016, several of Epstein’s alleged victims decried the plea deal, filing a civil lawsuit against the federal government and alleging Acosta’s office had violated their rights as victims by not notifying them of the secret agreement. The two sides have been in settlement talks since last summer, according to court documents. Brad Edwards, the attorney on behalf of the Jane Does, declined to comment on Acosta when reached by The Daily Beast, but has suggested he hopes the government will admit wrongdoing or perhaps pay a fine to resolve the case.
Federal prosecutors did offer some additional insight into Acosta’s decision during a 2015 hearing, were Assistant U.S. Attorney Dexter Lee suggested the alleged victims may have complicated any prosecution by the fact that they in turn became recruiters—finding additional victims, Lee said, for Epstein’s pyramid scheme in exchange for money.
"Your Honor, we believe there's an issue about whether or not Jane Does 1 and 2 may have been complicit in the offenses,” Lee said. “Specifically, that they themselves procured additional young women for Mr. Epstein and were paid commissions or referral fees for it.”
Epstein wasn’t the only scandal the labor secretary nominee was asked to address on Wednesday.
Senator Patty Murray questioned Acosta on his time as head of the civil rights division of the Department of Justice during the Bush administration between 2003 and 2005. During his tenure, the Department of Justice Inspector General found he relied on a subordinate, Bradley Schlozman, to make hiring decisions. Under Acosta’s watch, Schlozman illegally sought to purge liberal attorneys in favor of hiring more conservative, “real Americans” (as Schlozman put it). The Inspector General report never implicated Acosta himself in the department's politicization, but did determine he “took no action to investigate, bring the matter to the attention of their supervisors, or change Schlozman’s role in hiring for the Division.”
On that controversy, Acosta had little defense.
“That conduct should have never happened,” Acosta answered. “I deeply regret it.”
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... thing.html


President Trump on Witness List in Case Involving Pedophile Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein
by Rachel Stockman | 5:46 pm, March 14th, 2017

President Donald Trump is on the witness list for a civil trial, involving a Florida attorney, who represents convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein‘s alleged victims, and the disgraced billionaire himself.

“President Donald Trump has been identified as an individual who may have information relating to these allegations,” attorney Jack Scarola told LawNewz.com in an interview. Scarola is representing attorney Bradley Edwards, a party in the case.

Scarola told LawNewz.com that they have evidence that at least one of the now (former) employees at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club were recruited by Epstein’s agent to become involved in a pattern of alleged molestations.

The civil trial, which is expected to begin soon, is a complicated one and dates back to 2009. It involves allegations of malicious prosecution, and defamation filed by Florida attorney Bradley Edwards. Edwards also represents several of Epstein’s alleged victims who brought separate civil cases against Epstein. But, what is particularly interesting about this latest case is that it now appears to involve President Donald Trump himself.

In 2007, federal prosecutors, ironically under the leadership of Trump’s current Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta (who was a U.S. Attorney at the time), quietly entered into a secret non-prosecution agreement with the billionaire which ensured that Epstein and his ‘co-conspirators’ would not be prosecuted federally in exchange for Epstein’s guilty plea to state charges. Basically, Epstein got a slap on the wrist and served 13 months in a Florida prison and home detention for solicitation and procurement of minors for prostitution .

Court records in the civil case claim that Epstein repeatedly sexually assaulted more than 40 young girls on numerous occasions between 2002 and 2005 at his mansion in West Palm Beach, Florida.

While there is no evidence that Trump was involved in Epstein’s scheme, Bradley’s attorneys claim that “Trump and Epstein have acknowledged that they were friends, that they have socialized together. We have reason to believe that Trump was a guest in Epstein’s home during the period of time that Epstein was engaged in molestation.”

Trump is included on a witness list filed on August 31, 2016 along with Bill Richardson, the former governor of New Mexico.

In Bradley Edwards’ affidavit filed in support of the civil case, he claims that Mark Epstein (Jeffrey Epstein’s brother) testified that Trump flew on Jeffrey Epstein’s plane with him (the same plane where multiple young girls say they used to have sex.) Former President Bill Clinton is also said to have flown on that same plane.

“Epstein’s phone directory from his computer contains 14 phone numbers for Donald Trump, including emergency numbers, car numbers, and numbers to Trump’s security guard and houseman,” the affidavit claims.

“The likelihood is very low that he is deposed or called as a witness at trial,” Scarola explained in a story first reported by The Florida Bulldog, an investigative nonprofit. “There are, as you might imagine, substantial hurdles in calling a sitting U.S president and we don’t want any further delays on this case.”

The civil trial has been delayed several times, and a judge is expected to set a trial date shortly. We’ve reached out to Trump’s personal attorney for comment, and will update the story if we hear back.

This post has been updated to include a link to the Florida Bulldog website.
http://lawnewz.com/uncategorized/presid ... y-epstein/
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby stillrobertpaulsen » Thu May 04, 2017 5:33 pm

Sex slavery lawsuit links Trump’s Mar-a-Lago to pedophile ring: report
Noor Al-Sibai
04 May 2017 at 16:45 ET

Image
Jeffrey Epstein (left, via YouTube screengrab) and President Donald Trump (right, via Creative Commons)

Last fall’s allegations of sexual assault against President Donald Trump failed to stop his presidency, but one of the more explosive of those allegations is once again making headlines.

POLITICO reported that a new lawsuit reveals details linking Trump to billionaire pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, a convicted sex offender. The reports indicate that one lawsuit contains information about Virginia Giuffre who alleges that she met Epstein while working as a towel girl at Mar-a-Lago when she was 15 before being recruited into “sexual slavery”.

Giuffre’s case is set to appear before a judge on May 15, and although her accusations against Epstein have been public for some time, this is the first time the detail about her employment at Mar-a-Lago has been included.

Last summer, the Trump-Epstein connection made headlines when Trump was slated to win the Republican nomination, and just before the election, a woman came forward alleging that Trump raped her when she was 13 at one of Epstein’s parties — only to drop suit a few days later.

In 2015, Trump lawyers denied claims of the then-candidate’s involvement with Epstein by saying their only relation was that Epstein was “one of thousands of people who has visited Mar-a-Lago”. Those claims that fly in the face of a 2002 New York Magazine interview in which Trump claimed to have known Epstein for 15 years.

“He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side. No doubt about it — Jeffrey enjoys his social life,” Trump told reporters.
"Huey Long once said, “Fascism will come to America in the name of anti-fascism.” I'm afraid, based on my own experience, that fascism will come to America in the name of national security."
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Re: Billionaire Pedophile Goes Free

Postby seemslikeadream » Sun Jul 30, 2017 6:38 pm

ALEXANDER ACOSTA, DONALD TRUMP’S LABOR NOMINEE, GRILLED ON SECRET DEAL FOR BILLIONAIRE SEX OFFENDER JEFFREY EPSTEIN
BY NINA BURLEIGH ON 3/22/17 AT 6:44 PM
Image
Alexander Acosta holds a news conference in Miami in June 2006. President Donald Trump has nominated Acosta to be labor secretary.
MARC SEROTA/FILE PHOTO/REUTERS

“Wealth has great privileges,” writer Honore Balzac once observed, “And the most enviable of them all is the power of carrying out thoughts and feelings to the uttermost, of quickening sensibility by fulfilling its myriad caprices.”

A Florida mother first brought billionaire Jeffrey Epstein’s peculiar caprices to the attention of Palm Beach police in 2005 when she reported that her teenage daughter had been given $300 at an Epstein party to strip to her underwear and massage the mogul. Eventually, federal investigators and prosecutors built a case against Epstein (who started out as a teacher of seventh graders at a New York private school before striking it rich in finance) that involved 17 witnesses and five other underaged women.

Related: Jeffrey Epstein, the Sex Offender Who Mingles With Princes and Premiers

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But in September 2007, a Florida federal prosecutor named R. Alexander Acosta cut a secret plea deal with Epstein’s lawyers giving him what lawyers and police thought was an unusually lenient part-time, eight-hours a day county jail sentence, rather than the ten years or more in prison that a less powerful person might have gotten for repeated sex with minors.

Acosta also deviated from legal norms when he granted the deal without first notifying the young women who had spoken to investigators about their experiences with the billionaire. Details of the deal were not made public until a federal judge unsealed it as part of a civil lawsuit brought by four women in 2015.

Epstein was allowed to plead guilty to a single charge of soliciting prostitution from girls as young as 14. He ultimately served only 13 months in prison. After his sentence ended, Epstein returned to life in one of the homes he owns in Manhattan, Paris, a New Mexico ranch and a private Caribbean island.

On Wednesday, Acosta—now in private practice—testified in front of the Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee as Donald Trump’s nominee to be Secretary of Labor. Asked about the Epstein deal, he characterized it as within the bounds of normal prosecutorial behavior. "At the end of the day, based on the evidence, professionals within a prosecutor's office decide that a plea—that guarantees that someone goes to jail, that guarantees that someone register generally and that guarantees other outcomes—is a good thing," he said.

The civil suit against Epstein includes sensational charges involving the names of a Who’s Who of powerful men, including Bill Clinton and the Duke of York, who associated with Epstein, flew on his jet and allegedly cavorted with his stable of young women. That suit is pending.

In 2002, Donald Trump told New York magazine: “I've known Jeff for fifteen years. Terrific guy. He's a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side. No doubt about it—Jeffrey enjoys his social life.”

According to documents filed by victims’ attorneys Bradley Edwards and Paul Cassell, on the day the deal was signed, an attorney for Epstein sent an email to the prosecutor handling the case which read, “Please do whatever you can to keep this from becoming public.”

Epstein was defended by a pack of America’s top criminal lawyers, including Jay Lefkowitz, Kenneth Starr, Alan Dershowitz, Roy Black, and Gerald Lefcourt. Starr, a conservative Christian who served as president and chancellor of Southern Baptist Baylor University, was the independent prosecutor whose office interviewed Monica Lewinsky for twelve hours in 1998, and used her testimony and the evidence of a semen-stained blue dress to prompt the impeachment of Bill Clinton.

Jeffrey Epstein
Jeffrey Epstein pleaded guilty in 2008 to soliciting prostitution with a minor.
AP

Starr was also Acosta’s mentor at the Washington office of Kirkland & Ellis, a large law firm where Acosta worked as a newly minted lawyer in the 1990s. A former prosecutor suggested Epstein’s addition of Starr to his defense team was key to Acosta’s decision to putting the kibosh on the federal prosecution. “Acosta is pretending the failure to prosecute was routine,” the former prosecutor told Newsweek, asking for anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter. “But that’s bullshit. What happened here was completely and totally out of the main. Prosecutors wanted badly to prosecute this guy because he was an unrepentant perpetrator and child molester who was not going to stop absent significant incarceration. That Acosta overruled his prosecutors and didn’t notify the victims cannot be justified.”

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump was ensnared in the scandal when a woman filed suit claiming he raped her when she was underage during at one Epstein’s parties. The plaintiff dropped her case hours before she was due to appear at a news conference in California with her lawyer, Lisa Bloom.

“I think it is absolutely appalling that he gave Jeffrey Epstein such a sweet deal in light of the number of accusers that were out there,” Bloom told Newsweek while Acosta was testifying on Wednesday. “I think it should disqualify him for any other government job. If you don’t take the sexual exploitation of minors seriously, you don’t have the fundamental decency to be working for us.”

Citing press reports, Bloom says there appeared to be more than five women who came forward to talk to prosecutors about Epstein. “For him to say they came out after the conviction, that’s passing the buck. What efforts did you make to find them? These cases don’t just happen. They happen because prosecutors do the hard work to shore up victims who are always scared.”
http://www.newsweek.com/epstein-sex-off ... bor-572559


Venture Capital‏
@kelly2277

About Epstein's recording room under the stairs that was remodeled to be a tech room. Details from a deposition.
Image



Venture Capital‏ @kelly2277 2h2 hours ago
Were there were witnesses to Epstein’s abuse Yes Alfredo Rodriguez, his employee took a Journal from his computer- The Holy Grail

Image



Venture Capital‏
@kelly2277

Jeffrey Epstein continually threatened harassed and intimidated victims of his abuse to attempt to scare them into silence.
Image


Epstein Full flight logs
https://www.documentcloud.org/documents ... fests.html

Venture Capital‏ @kelly2277 9h9 hours ago
Tiffany Doe and Joan Doe we’re recruiting and planning events for Epstein. I believe Tiffany, very likely may be Ghislaine Maxwell...
Image
Mazars and Deutsche Bank could have ended this nightmare before it started.
They could still get him out of office.
But instead, they want mass death.
Don’t forget that.
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