"Secret society" of prominent Australians: The Brotherhood

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"Secret society" of prominent Australians: The Brotherhood

Postby cptmarginal » Sat Mar 12, 2011 6:36 pm

http://www.smh.com.au/victoria/inside-t ... 1be5p.html

Inside The Brotherhood, where Chatham rules apply
Megan Levy
March 2, 2011

Is it a lunch forum for gentlemen to wax lyrical about sport and politics? Or a secret society founded on the old police boy’s network designed to trade black market information?

Differing accounts have been offered today of the workings of The Brotherhood, a secretive group of up to 350 prominent men - including police officers, state government officials and lawyers - which has been meeting in inner-city Melbourne for the best part of a decade.

In a report tabled to parliament today, Ombudsman George Brouwer paints a worrying picture of the secret organisation, which he says was established to serve the interests of its mysterious founder.

‘‘The culture of the organisation ... encourages exclusivity and secrecy, with the potential for illegal and improper exchanges of information or favours,’’ Mr Brouwer said in his report.

He found that a police officer on The Brotherhood list used his position at the traffic camera office to wipe $2000 worth of the founder’s speeding fines.

A senior police officer may have also disclosed the identity of a prosecution witness in a high profile murder investigation during a Brotherhood lunch, in breach of a Supreme Court suppression order.

The whistleblower who sparked the ombudsman’s investigation was also damning of the group, describing it as a secretive organisation that ‘‘engages in unlawful information trading’’, such as criminal record checks.

But those views are hotly contested by The Brotherhood’s founder, a former police officer and now company director who compares his organisation to Apex or Rotary.

Indeed, he is now even considering changing the name of the group from the Brotherhood, with its connotations of exclusivity and secrecy, to MOGI - Men of Good Ilk.

Victoria’s police chief Simon Overland today said he had ‘‘deep concerns’’ about the group.

The report says The Brotherhood began in 2003 when the founder, who is not identified in the reportbut has has been named in previous media reports as John Moncrieff, and an unidentified police inspector arranged a function for friends and business associates. Six to eight people, including lawyers, attended the first lunch.

The group has grown since then, with about 300 to 350 people on its circulation list - including a former Victoria Police officer with alleged links to an organised crime figure, a former Australian Wheat Board executive accused of involvement in the Iraq kickbacks scandal, and the manager of a table-top dancing club regulated by the police.

Two state MPs are also on the circulation list, however Mr Brouwer said he was confident they were added without their agreement.

Members of The Brotherhood are permitted to join the group at the discretion of the founder, who is described as a former Victoria Police officer who joined the force in 1988 before resigning in 1999 at the rank of senior constable. He now works as the managing director of two proprietary companies.

His record shows he came to the attention of the Victoria Police Internal Investigations Department on several occasions for disciplinary matters.

These included an assault on a member of the public, for which he was fined $200; negligence in the discharge of duty and providing a false and misleading statement to a police inspector during a disciplinary interview, for which he was fined $150; and engaging in paid secondary employment without approval, for which he was officially admonished.

The founder claims members of The Brotherhood are ‘‘men of good ilk’’, and could join the group if they were a ‘‘good bloke’’.

Until recently, The Brotherhood met at an inner-city venue about every six weeks. The founder invited a range of people to speak at lunches to entertain and purportedly provide an insight into their respective fields of expertise.

The founder organised the lunches, he claimed, to bring ‘‘business associates and businessmen together to have a common goal in relation to business networking and business insight and business information’’.

When interviewed in September last year, the founder said there was ‘‘nothing at all’ in it for him.

The group was not secretive and had donated to the Victorian Bushfire Appeal and breast cancer research, he said, comparing the organisation to Apex and Rotary.

During lunches, he said, The Brotherhood members talked about issues ranging from sport to politics, and no unlawful information trading took place.

But a witness who attended lunches said the founder would state at the beginning of a lunch: ‘‘We’re all members of The Brotherhood and we must assist each other’’.

The founder admitted he told those at the lunches that ‘Chatham rules’ apply– that is, ‘‘What’s said in the room stays in the room’’.

Mr Brouwer said he did not believe The Brotherhood had approached the dimensions of the so-called Information Exchange Club, which was founded on the old-boy police network in NSW and was the subject of an Independent Commission Against Corruption inquiry into the unauthorised release of confidential information by government authorities in the 1990s.

However he recommended that public sector agencies advise their employees of the risk of ‘‘attending meetings or functions of organisations, such as The Brotherhood, which are designed to support the business aspirations of the organiser or controller of the organisation’’.


'Secretive' Brotherhood has nothing to hide

Image

We're not secretive: The Brotherhood founder John Moncrieff. (Lateline)
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Re: "Secret society" of prominent Australians: The Brotherho

Postby vanlose kid » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:56 pm

read OP, went google, found this:

Brotherhood founder defends men's club

The founder of a Melbourne men's club known as The Brotherhood says there is nothing sinister about it, despite the ombudsman describing it as secretive with the potential for illegal activity.

Current and former police officers, two state MPs, members of private organisations and public servants who have access to databases containing sensitive information regularly meet for lunch in the name of The Brotherhood, according to Ombudsman George Brouwer.

Mr Brouwer says the group has an emphasis on exclusivity and secrecy and has the potential for illegal information trading.

In a report tabled to parliament on Wednesday, Mr Brouwer says there are up to 350 men on The Brotherhood's circulation list.

The report says men on the list have been the subject of criminal and corruption investigations.

They include a former Victoria Police officer with alleged links to an organised crime figure, a former Australian Wheat Board executive accused of involvement in the Iraq kickbacks scandal, and the manager of a table-top dancing club regulated by the police.

Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Simon Overland has told Mr Brouwer he is deeply concerned about The Brotherhood's activities.

The founder, former police officer John Moncrieff, says there is nothing clandestine about the gatherings of "men of good ilk", for lunch at The Kelvin Club in Melbourne's CBD.

"We're not secretive and we're certainly not corrupt and we have nothing to hide," he told Fairfax Radio on Wednesday.

"I certainly don't wear a white hood and have a couple of holes cut out.
"I'm just an easygoing Australian man that's a businessman.

"I live by a simple creed that you can't go wrong doing the right thing."
Mr Brouwer said the culture of The Brotherhood was evident in its name.

"In this context of police culture it is commonly used to emphasise exclusivity, secrecy and a culture that requires police at all levels to do whatever is required to protect their fellow police," he said.

"This culture protects police officers who break the law and strongly discourages others from blowing the whistle on corruption."


Mr Overland said he had "deep concerns" over The Brotherhood's activities and the direct involvement of serving and retired police.

"Such gatherings, even when totally benign, have the potential to undermine confidence in public institutions - especially policing," Mr Overland states in the report.

But Police Association secretary Greg Davies said unless any improper behaviour had been proved, The Brotherhood was just a group of men having lunch.

"If that's all it is, no I don't think there's anything to worry about," Mr Davies told reporters.

Mr Brouwer said The Brotherhood, which was formed in 2003, was established to serve the interests of the founder, who controls membership of the group.

He said he was satisfied the MPs had no involvement with The Brotherhood and had been placed on circulation lists without their agreement.

Mr Moncrieff denied Mr Brouwer's assertion a police officer on The Brotherhood list used his position at the traffic camera office to wipe $2000 worth of the founder's speeding fines.

A Victoria Police investigation into the officer involved was under way, the ombudsman said.

Mr Brouwer also found a senior police officer may have disclosed the identity of a prosecution witness in a high-profile murder investigation during a Brotherhood lunch, in breach of a Supreme Court suppression order.

Mr Moncrieff denied using The Brotherhood meetings to secure contracts for his security company MONJON, which lists among its clients Thiess, the design and construction contractor for Victoria's Wonthaggi desalination plant.

Government MP Richard Dalla-Riva admitted he was one of the two MPs put on The Brotherhood's list without their knowledge.

"I confirm the statement in the ombudsman's report that I had no involvement with the Brotherhood and my name was placed on the circulation list without my agreement or knowledge," Mr Dalla-Riva said in a statement.

"I also confirm the Ombudsman's statement that I did not attend any Brotherhood lunches nor respond to any requests for assistance.".

aap 2 Feb 2011


Anglo - Masonic rule has been in Australia from its very foundations.


This is nothing new to legal, business, political and medical criminal and other communities.


Deals are done from within the walls of the Masonic Lodge.


Court cases are decided on the basis of Mason vs Non-Mason amongst other pre-requisites.


To publicly say that this is not true is nothing more than a blatant farce.

http://corpau.blogspot.com/2011/03/brot ... -club.html



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Re: "Secret society" of prominent Australians: The Brotherho

Postby wintler2 » Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:12 pm

Relevant context is that witnesses testifying to police corruption have a habit of being killed before trial in Victoria (3 come immediately to mind, am sure there are more), and theres been no significant successful prosecutions of police in over a decade, despite all sorts of stinky links and associations coming to light (on former Police Assoc. Pres. Paul Mullett particularly). Apparently there are over 2 dozen relevant suppression orders in force, restricting much of what can be said or asked by the media.

I often wonder what happened to long-gone poster Biothanatoid, they'd be my first source of choice on the issue. I PM'd an offer of help many years ago, might have been what scared them away :/
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Re: "Secret society" of prominent Australians: The Brotherho

Postby vanlose kid » Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:24 pm

^^ there must be an aussie website/blog that covers this, no?

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Re: "Secret society" of prominent Australians: The Brotherho

Postby wintler2 » Sun Mar 13, 2011 6:10 am

vanlose kid wrote:^^ there must be an aussie website/blog that covers this, no?

*

Not that i'm aware of, no.

To substantiate my 'dead whistleblowers' claim:
Carl Williams, jailed hitman in max security, outed by News Corps Melbourne Herald Sun as receiving $ from cops, killed same day.
Terence & Christine Hodson, TH was revealed as an informer by leaked police docs via Police Association president Paul Mullett, they were executed inside their fortified home.
Another police witness who backed out after claiming insufficient support and protection
Shane Chartres-Abbott, male prostitute about to go to jail, said have turned informer.

See also this wikipedia page, broadly accurate except that the 'gangland war' is not over, bodies keep stacking up.
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Re: "Secret society" of prominent Australians: The Brotherho

Postby cptmarginal » Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:06 pm

Thanks wintler2, for that fascinating information!

I'm reminded also of Michael McGurk:

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=25093

SYDNEY (AFP) – A millionaire Australian property developer who once tried to sue the sultan of Brunei was gunned down in front of his young son outside their exclusive Sydney home, police said Friday.

Scottish-born Michael McGurk, 45, was shot once in the head by a lone gunman as he stepped from his luxury Mercedes in the harbourside suburb of Cremorne with his 10-year-old son on Thursday night, said Superintendent Geoff Beresford.

Beresford would not confirm claims McGurk had feared a hitman was on his trail and had approached police to ask for protection, but said the developer appeared to be the victim of a callous and "very targeted" act.

"We are very open-minded at the moment but what I can confirm is the deceased is very well-known to the police," he said.

"This gentleman did have a lot of associates that are also known to us, and those inquiries are well and truly under way."

Beresford said McGurk's young son was "very close" to his father as he was shot, and though unhurt, had been "very traumatised" by what he saw.

McGurk's mother-in-law Noreen McDonald said her grandson had come running into the house screaming "Mummy, mummy, mummy, quickly, daddy".

"She raced out. He was bleeding all over the place and passed away," McDonald said.

McGurk, who in 2007 unsuccessfully tried to sue the Sultan of Brunei over an alleged eight million US dollar agreement to buy a 400-year-old gold-lined miniature Koran, was alive when police arrived but died a short time later.

McGurk claimed to have bought the matchbox-sized Islamic artefact from a former colonel in the KGB secret police, and said the sultan reneged on a deal to buy it as a gift for his third wife.

The well-known developer was due to appear in Sydney's Supreme Court on Friday over a property dispute, and lawyer Mark Johnson told the judge his client had been murdered.

"He was a charismatic, intelligent, generous bloke," Johnson said outside the court, adding that the murder was "awful, unspeakable."

Local media said McGurk had, until two weeks ago, been facing assault and arson charges related to the fire-bombing of a waterfront mansion on Wolseley Road, Point Piper, which is Australia's most expensive street.

Prosecutors dropped the billionaires' row case against McGurk last month, but he reportedly told journalists there was a hitman on his trail.

Warren Mallard, a private investigator who had worked for McGurk, said he had worked a number of "bizarre" cases for the developer, involving people who did not play "by the rules".

"I would imagine ... that there are a lot of people that may have had what they thought was reasons to do him in because of the nature of the work and the business that he was involved in," Mallard told commercial radio.

"I'd imagine it's a bit of a needle in the haystack in relation to the cast of suspects," he added.

Neighbours said McGurk's home had been under sporadic police surveillance.


Without going into the details of the now-concluded investigation into this incident & the conviction of Ron Medich, this was one hell of a strange story right from the start.
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