NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:24 pm

Safe house and treatment center for RA victims opens in Germany.

http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/ritual-abuse-sanctuary-vielseits?utm_source=vicefbuk

Gaby Breitenbach must have seen and heard some awful things. The German psychotherapist is talking about how sometimes, from a very young age, women are systematically tortured by people seeking to split their minds into multiple identities. The desire is to control the victims, of course, but also to leave them with an identity that to strangers seems perfectly normal. While the victim's everyday identity will have no "memory" of the trauma they've experienced, Breitenbach says the abusers are able to "summon" the other identities with various triggers. This can be something as simple as a ringtone, for example.

This method of mind control is known as "ritual abuse". Most of the time the abuse is sexual in nature. Sometimes the abusers crave power, sometimes they're just being cruel. Sometimes they're pseudo-religious nutjobs, sometimes they're fascists, often they are organised crime networks. Sometimes the abusers use their victims to gain membership to a secret society; sometimes they flick a switch in their minds to make them commit suicide. The world can be an incredibly shitty place.

Last month, Breitenbach opened a safehouse to treat victims of ritual abuse in Germany. Vielseits – meaning "versatility" – is the first of its kind in Europe, and offers trauma therapy to anyone who walks through its doors. I gave her a call to find out more. ...


http://www.vielseits.de/
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Wed Apr 02, 2014 3:08 am

Ross Cheit is publishing a new book on the infamous day care cases...

http://www.providencejournal.com/breaking-news/content/20140323-in-new-book-brown-university-professor-aims-to-discredit-witch-hunt-narrative-of-child-sexual-abuse-cases.ece?fb_action_ids=641665285902632&fb_action_types=og.comments

In new book, Brown University professor aims to discredit ‘witch-hunt narrative’ of child sexual-abuse cases
March 23, 2014 01:00 AM

BY KATE BRAMSON
Journal Staff Writer
kbramson@providencejournal.com
PROVIDENCE — For decades, a view has persisted that a series of child sexual-abuse cases connected with child-care centers during the 1980s were witch hunts, fueled by social hysteria, that ended in wrongful convictions of many innocent people.
A new book by Brown University professor Ross E. Cheit, “The Witch-Hunt Narrative: Politics, Psychology, and the Sexual Abuse of Children,” explores the cases at the heart of that belief.
After 15 years of research into the history of child sexual-abuse cases, the political science and public policy professor seeks to discredit the “witch-hunt narrative.”
In an interview with The Providence Journal, Cheit said that those who believe this theory ignore even credible charges of child abuse and dismiss medical evidence that children were abused.
“I want to provoke discussion,” he said.
Much of the reason the witch-hunt narrative has prevailed, according to Cheit, is that it’s easier for people to believe that child sexual abuse doesn’t happen because the topic itself is taboo. Cheit cites the work of Dr. Suzanne M. Sgroi, who wrote in 1978 that “the sexual abuse of children is a crime that our society abhors in the abstract but tolerates in reality.”
Communities have been known to rally around people convicted of this crime, Cheit writes.
“We often minimize and deny so as to allow us to avoid seeing things we would rather not see. Turning a blind eye to the sexual abuse of children has a long history in this country.”
According to Cheit, the witch-hunt narrative often includes a “hero,” a journalist perhaps, who helps an innocent person escape a false conviction.
“We love this story,” he said. “My concern is we love it so much even when it isn’t true.”

Cheit began his research inclined to doubt the witch-hunt narrative in part because he was abused as a child by an administrator of the San Francisco Boys Chorus’ summer camp.
Repressed memories of that abuse, which took place when Cheit was 13, surfaced in 1992, after he had become a professor at Brown. He shared that experience in a Providence Journal series written by former reporter Mike Stanton in 1995.
Cheit eventually won a civil judgment in California against the man who abused him and reached a civil settlement against the San Francisco Boys Chorus, which agreed to promote awareness of sexual abuse.
“My own experience with an institution that displayed for me the depths of denial in the face of very strong evidence makes me naturally skeptical of an argument that says we’ve overreacted to child abuse, because that’s not what I saw,” Cheit said.

In his research, Cheit adhered to a practice of Charles Darwin: posting notes for himself with evidence contrary to his own theories or expectations, forcing himself to examine the cases and arguments used to build the witch-hunt narrative.
“I’m saying, ‘I’m going to force myself to look at the cases that you say prove the witch hunt was true,’” Cheit said. “I’m looking at the cases where it absolutely ought to be crystal clear that this was a false conviction because that’s what other people said.”
Labeling these cases witch hunts ignores credible evidence that children were abused, Cheit argues.
Take the famous 1983 McMartin Preschool case in Manhattan Beach, Calif., in which seven of the school’s staff members were charged with child sexual abuse. Cheit reviewed 32 boxes of court documents including transcripts of hearings and two criminal trials, 17 boxes of documents and reports before charges were filed, medical records of children and copies of videotaped interviews with 15 children.
Cheit writes that five or six of the defendants were charged with “heinous crimes they did not commit,” but the witch-hunt narrative ignores the smaller story, the one that includes “evidence of abuse and the travails of the children.” No one was ever convicted in the case.
“It was tragic for the defendants who should not have been charged, and it was tragic for the children who were mistreated and those who were never appropriately vindicated,” Cheit writes. “But only one of those tragedies has been remembered over time.”


Over the years, 81 Brown University undergraduates have assisted Cheit in conducting what he calls the “extreme research” that helped him analyze dozens of decades-old cases including the McMartin Preschool case.
“This book is based on the first systematic examination of court records in these cases,” Cheit writes. “The book argues that even though many cases have been held up as classic examples of modern American ‘witch hunts,’ none of them truly fits that description … In short, there was not, by any reasonable measure, an epidemic of ‘witch hunts’ in the 1980s.”
Cheit is not alone with this belief.
Joan Tabachnick, who has worked for the past 20 years in the field of sexual-abuse prevention, avoids the witch-hunt term, she told The Providence Journal. Her work focuses on preventing child sexual abuse.
“I learned from very early on not to call it the witch-hunt narrative, only because the witches [in America’s Puritan past] were innocent, and I would say that in many cases, there is that same sort of feeding-frenzy fury, but it doesn’t mean the sex offender is innocent, the person accused is innocent,” said Tabachnick, of Holyoke, Mass., who is co-chair of the prevention committee for the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

For the past 16 years, Cheit has taught an ethics class at the state prison to those convicted of sexual assault and child molestation crimes.
After The Journal series on Cheit’s childhood abuse ran in 1995, the director of the sex offender treatment program at the Adult Correctional Institutions, Peter Loss, invited Cheit to visit offenders in the program.
Years later, Cheit still meets weekly with those offenders, mostly men. Sometimes the class focuses on a different virtue and dilemma each week, such as the meaning of courage and how donations raised for victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks should be allocated.
“I call it the gray class because sex offenders are such black-and-white thinkers,” Loss told The Journal.
The offenders, Loss explains, have trouble seeing the complications inherent in relationships or the fact that an opposing side may present merits, something that complicates one’s thinking.
The witch-hunt narrative, says Loss, who has read several drafts of Cheit’s book, is also black and white.
But “in the end, this whole debate really isn’t about witch hunts and cases … ,” Loss said. “It’s about children. And I think [what’s] been lost in this whole witch-hunt mentality is that children are involved.”
Cheit expects to discuss his findings with a panel of professors at Brown on April 1, with a reception and book signing to follow. His book will be released this month by Oxford University Press and is expected in stores by April.


http://www.amazon.com/The-Witch-Hunt-Narrative-Politics-Psychology/dp/0199931224/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396421242&sr=8-1&keywords=witch-hunt+narrative
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Sat May 31, 2014 7:03 pm

How to talk about ritual abuse and get it on the CBC? Call it non-state torture. And that's what it is.

Two lovely Canadian activists and a survivor finally get their due.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/n-s-woman-tortured-for-years-by-her-family-speaks-out-1.2655876

There's also a radio interview, and a documentary airing this Sunday.


Exclusive
N.S. woman 'tortured' for years by her family speaks out
WARNING: This story contains graphic details that may be disturbing to some readers

By Angela MacIvor, Susan Allen, CBC News Posted: May 28, 2014 6:03 AM AT Last Updated: May 30, 2014 5:22 PM AT

Two Nova Scotia registered nurses who run a human rights advocacy group are speaking out about domestic "torture" cases with the help of a woman victim who first sparked the issue for them more than 20 years ago.

"We tried to find people to help her and no one really wanted to. About three sessions into her work, we realized she was a torture survivor because her story went way beyond abuse, so we stayed with her and we helped her heal," said Linda MacDonald.

MacDonald and fellow registered nurse Jeanne Sarson are the founders of Persons Against NST (Non-State Torture).

They say their first foray into looking at domestic torture began in 1993 when Sarson took a call from a woman in her late 20s who goes by the name Sara.

"That night, I said, 'I know I can't live with this anymore.' I had it all planned out for suicide, and I said I'll call this number in the pamphlet and if nobody answers, I know it's right," Sara told CBC News.

Sara, who is now 50 years old and uses a pseudonym to protect her identity, alleges she was starved, drugged, confined, beaten and raped by her own parents from the time she was a young child.

'I'm working as hard as I can to rise above these damn people to be the best person I can be ....'- Sara

"I remember so often being rented out and I remember the statement, 'Bring her back when you're done.' And I remember feeling like a thing," Sara says.

"But also the whole time is so confusing, because you don't understand. I was so young and ... you think it's normal."

Sara says the violence went on for years, even while she was working and living in her own apartment.

She never went to police because she says she was afraid her family would hurt her more.

"They would torture you over, and over and over again. They wouldn't just tell you — they'd do it. And they could come up with torture you can't even think of," said Sara.

Sarson and MacDonald say the violence suffered by Sara amounts to torture. They say being unable to find "torture-informed support" for Sara led them to start Persons Against NST.

Over the years, Sarson and MacDonald say they've helped more than 3,000 victims of NST around the globe, including about a dozen or so cases in Nova Scotia.

MacDonald says counselling can continue for two to three years. In some cases, they work with victims for over a decade.

Canada does not recognize "torture" under the law, unlike Michigan, California, France and Queensland, Australia, which do.
Finding help

Sarson recalls Sara's call to a Truro help line late at night in 1993.

"I picked it up and the voice on the other end was a woman who I did not know. I had no way to contact her," Sarson says.

Need help? Go to Persons Against Non-State Torture

Sara talked that night, and called again. Some days, she called dozens of times. Her story spilled out over the next decade. Sarson and MacDonald, helped Sara on the phone and in person.

Though she never went to police, Sara eventually was able to break away from her family and the abuse she alleges took place for much of her young life. She said the violence troubles her to this day and memories often leave her exhausted.

"I have so much grief, and so much loss and so much just taken from me," she says.

"I'm working as hard as I can to rise above these damn people to be the best person I can be, and hopefully, if I can't bring an end to it, I can slow it down big time."

'I'm lucky to be alive'

Because she was too afraid of the potential repercussions of reporting the alleged abuse, Sara's parents were never investigated by police.

The RCMP don't track "torture" against children, so can't say how many people suffer Sara's fate.

Sara says she owes her life to Sarson and MacDonald.

"I want to live on most days. I still have trouble, but most days I want to live. It's challenging and difficult, but I know I'm lucky to be alive. And I'm only alive because Jeanne answered the phone."

'There are brutal people all over the world. It isn't just in the past. It's present day.'- Linda MacDonald

Sarson and MacDonald say their goal is to have NST recognized as a "specific and distinct human rights violation."

"I just had to start believing that's another reality of violence that I'd never really known about, and I just went back to my knowledge about the Holocaust and knowing how brutal people can be," said MacDonald.

"There are brutal people all over the world. It isn't just in the past, it's present day. So I just had to reframe my worldview of what human beings are capable of."

CBC Investigates

She says torture goes far beyond assault.

"Torture is daily. You're tortured so much, with so many techniques — verbally, physically, sexually, methodically and it becomes part of your skin. After a while it ... well it hurts, but you think it doesn't hurt."

Sarson and MacDonald say they won't give up until police and politicians recognize that more resources are needed to help victims of torture.
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Mon Aug 18, 2014 12:07 am

New survivor account published through Colin Ross' press this spring:

http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-Evil-Control-Experiments-Vermont/dp/0981537634

Beginning at age thirteen, Karen Wetmore was subjected to horrific treatment in Vermont State Hospital and related facilities. Through years of investigative journalism, and numerous Freedom of Information Act requests, she was able do document that she was a victim of secret CIA mind control experiments as an adolescent, and of sexual abuse by one of her psychiatrists. Karen's psychiatrists included Robert Hyde, M.D., who was cleared at TOP SECRET as the contractor on CIA LSD experiments conducted under MKULTRA Subprojects 8, 10, 63, and 66. Karen calls for an investigation into the nearly 3000 deaths at Vermont State Hospital from 1952 to 1973, when CIA money was pouring into the hospital. These deaths may have provided cover for terminal experiments conducted at the hospital.


There are no poetic flourishes in the prose, but the tale is told relatively competently. It is worth acquiring for the fact that Wetmore is able to document direct connections between her experiences and CIA funded researchers, as well as to note how many authorities she's contacted who refused to aid her in any way. The book sorely needs an index and to be footnoted however. I'd really like to find the original source of this quote:

“One can safely predict techniques for controlling behavior and modifying personality will grow more effective by the year 2000. Thousands of experts at conditioning are now trying out their behavior changing techniques on tens of thousands of people in classrooms, prisons, mental hospitals , day care centers and nursing homes.” American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1967
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:39 am

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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby RocketMan » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:52 am

Thank you Willow for keeping this thread alive. :) Lots of interesting stuff here!
-I don't like hoodlums.
-That's just a word, Marlowe. We have that kind of world. Two wars gave it to us and we are going to keep it.
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby cptmarginal » Fri Nov 13, 2015 12:43 am

I overlooked this one, thanks...

Project Willow wrote:New survivor account published through Colin Ross' press this spring:

http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-Evil-Control-Experiments-Vermont/dp/0981537634

Beginning at age thirteen, Karen Wetmore was subjected to horrific treatment in Vermont State Hospital and related facilities. Through years of investigative journalism, and numerous Freedom of Information Act requests, she was able do document that she was a victim of secret CIA mind control experiments as an adolescent, and of sexual abuse by one of her psychiatrists. Karen's psychiatrists included Robert Hyde, M.D., who was cleared at TOP SECRET as the contractor on CIA LSD experiments conducted under MKULTRA Subprojects 8, 10, 63, and 66. Karen calls for an investigation into the nearly 3000 deaths at Vermont State Hospital from 1952 to 1973, when CIA money was pouring into the hospital. These deaths may have provided cover for terminal experiments conducted at the hospital.


There are no poetic flourishes in the prose, but the tale is told relatively competently. It is worth acquiring for the fact that Wetmore is able to document direct connections between her experiences and CIA funded researchers, as well as to note how many authorities she's contacted who refused to aid her in any way. The book sorely needs an index and to be footnoted however. I'd really like to find the original source of this quote:

“One can safely predict techniques for controlling behavior and modifying personality will grow more effective by the year 2000. Thousands of experts at conditioning are now trying out their behavior changing techniques on tens of thousands of people in classrooms, prisons, mental hospitals , day care centers and nursing homes.” American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1967
The new way of thinking is precisely delineated by what it is not.
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby RocketMan » Sun Nov 22, 2015 12:27 pm

I'm reading the Cheit book. It's good and clearly is based on exhaustive and solid research. However, when coming up against testimony relating satanic, ritual abuse, Cheit habitually bypasses them by saying something like "From my point of view, this testimony is impossible to believe". He otherwise looks comprehensively at the evidence, but seems to dismiss testimony regarding more outré activities out of hand, as "simply impossible to believe" without further elaborating on why he thinks this is so, other than that ritualistic abuse is completely outside of so-called normal experience.

What I'm left wondering is, how is it possible that such a wide variety of very young children, widely geographically distributed, describe such things as masks, robes, animal and even human sacrifice and trips to the graveyard. Sure, part of it could conceivably be due to contamination by inappropriate interviews which in turn were influenced by some sort of nation-wide moral panic... But Cheit hasn't yet said anything about this phenomenon. Granted, I'm only on page 150 of a 500 page book, but still.
-I don't like hoodlums.
-That's just a word, Marlowe. We have that kind of world. Two wars gave it to us and we are going to keep it.
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Elvis » Sun Dec 06, 2015 2:05 am

I wasn't sure where to post this, but heard it on BBC Radio and thought it worthwhile. It doesn't sound as if the woman is a victim of an MK-type program (rather, a "traumatic accident"), but there are some intriguing aspects to her case. Worth the short listen. Thoughts?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03921cy
Sometimes blind, sometimes sighted - the woman with multiple personalities

This unnamed woman went blind after a traumatic accident - but now some of her multiple personalities can see. Her condition gives a new perspective on how the brain processes visual information as she switches between blind and sighted states, depending on her personality.

(I don't think the BBC audio player can be embedded here.)
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Sun Dec 06, 2015 5:39 am

RocketMan » 22 Nov 2015 08:27 wrote:What I'm left wondering is, how is it possible that such a wide variety of very young children, widely geographically distributed, describe such things as masks, robes, animal and even human sacrifice and trips to the graveyard. Sure, part of it could conceivably be due to contamination by inappropriate interviews which in turn were influenced by some sort of nation-wide moral panic... But Cheit hasn't yet said anything about this phenomenon. Granted, I'm only on page 150 of a 500 page book, but still.


Thanks for that, pretty much what I've heard from everyone who's read it.




Elvis wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03921cy
Sometimes blind, sometimes sighted - the woman with multiple personalities


WaPo article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/11/24/the-blind-woman-who-switched-personalities-and-could-suddenly-see/?postshare=8051448687205448&tid=ss_fb-bottom

...
One explanation, that B.T. was “malingering,” or lying about her disability, was disproved by an EEG test. When B.T. was in her two blind states, her brain showed none of the electrical responses to visual stimuli that sighted people would display — even though B.T.’s eyes were open and she was looking right at them.
...
But Strasburger and Waldvogel say their finding is evidence that DID can unfold at a very basic, biological level. After all, it was not just high-level cognitive functions, like reading, that were affected by B.T.’s condition — even basic things like depth perception were difficult for her. And B.T.’s doctors could see all that playing out in her brain right in front of them on the EEG.
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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Thu Nov 24, 2016 1:44 am

Two items of note. The University of Manitoba has created an archive of the work of the late survivor and activist Lynne Moss-Sharman. Staci Sprout, a survivor and therapist from Seattle, has created an impressive presentation/video primer on Extreme abuse (RA/MC). Please share these resources widely, they are excellent.

Lynne Moss-Sharman Archive: http://umanitoba.ca/libraries/units/archives/collections/complete_holdings/ead/html/Sharman_Lynne_Moss.shtml#tag_bioghist

Media coverage: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/our-communities/souwester/Collection-a-community-resource-394836901.html
Collection a community resource
Recently acquired archive may be used in national inquiry
DANIELLE DA SILVA - SOU'WESTER

In trying to comprehend violence against women, child abuse and social injustice, one woman’s archival collection may help communities gain greater insight.

The University of Manitoba’s Archives and Special Collections recently acquired the clippings, photographs, journals, and documents compiled by Lynne Moss Sharman dating back to the 1970s and gathered over the past three decades.

Material contained in the Lynn Moss Sharman collection includes photographs, journal entries, newspaper clippings and more.
The fonds explore topics ranging from missing and murdered Indigenous women, child abuse and foster care, prison deaths, and community action on issues.

According to Brian Hubner, acquisitions and access archivist with the university, the impetus for Sharman’s documentation began with her research into mind control experiments and abuse performed on children. Sharman claimed to be a survivor of experiments and government-sanctioned child abuse. She died in March 2014 at the age of 66.

"She was initially interested in medical experiments," Hubner said. "Cold War medical experiments were done on her as a child and she was able to prove that. She reached out to other people who were victims of that, and that was really the origin of her research and her collecting."

Sharman, an activist, social worker and artist from Thunder Bay, Ont., used the collection as a research bank of material, Hubner said. Sharman carefully curated the collection, with sections of the archive focused on the Pickton trials, the Highway of Tears, individual cases of missing and murdered women, and the media coverage that framed it all. She was passionate about her work and added her own annotations to the information she gathered in respect of its subjects, Hubner said.

Hubner believes her motivation was to document what was happening in her community and communities across Canada and make it available to people, survivors, victims and families to use as a resource.

"I think she saw it as a real mission of hers to make it available to the community as a whole," he said.

The university came into possession of the collection after being contacted by friends of Sharman. They requested the university look into acquiring the archive in order to expand its reach and keep it accessible to the community.

From an academic and research perspective, Hubner hopes the collection will be used during the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Hubner has reached out the inquiry to make them aware of the collection and significant material it holds.

"It’s important in and of itself, but the fact that it might be used in a more formal setting and could be valuable in that setting made me think that it’s really important that we get this," he said.

Hubner also expects the nine boxes of material will be a good starting point for important academic research within the university and beyond.

"We hope the inquiry uses it and other community people (access it). Also, there will become a day when there will be academic research of this topic," he said.

"The interest will develop and the material has really only been available for a few months and collections like this are the kind of thing that it’s often years before they’re used to their potential."

For more information about the Lynne Moss Sharman fonds go to umanitoba.ca/libraries


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Re: NST, RA(T), & MC Survivor Advocacy & News

Postby Project Willow » Sun Dec 11, 2016 6:56 pm

Ellen Lacter on Ed Opperman

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