Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

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ex Army and served in a psychological operations unit

Postby MinM » Mon Aug 06, 2012 10:26 am

Image
CUDAHY, Wis. – The man authorities say killed six in a Milwaukee-area Sikh temple before police shot him was a heavily-tattooed, 40-year-old ex-Army soldier, sources told Fox News, but what triggered his rampage remains unclear...

According to sources in the U.S. Army, Page enlisted in April 1992 and was given a less-than-honorable discharge in October 1998. He served at Fort Bliss, Texas, in the psychological operations unit in 1994, and was last stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., attached to the psychological operations unit. The details of his discharge were not immediately clear.

Prior to starting the search at the 3700 block of Holmes Ave., police asked two blocks of residents to leave the area or remain indoors. FBI agents are there with an armored truck, a trailer and other vehicles. Other law enforcement officers are there too, along with a police dog.
...

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/08/06/au ... kh-temple/

Fort Bliss was prominent in the book Seven Days in May...

Fort Bragg is infamous for it's fake defector program and it's connections to Operation Phoenix.
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby barracuda » Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:12 am

The gunman who killed six people at a Wisconsin Sikh temple was a U.S. Army veteran, military sources said on Monday, and a monitor of extremists said he had links to hate groups.
A law enforcement source identified the tall, bald, white gunman as Wade Michael Page, 40.

The gunman shot dead six people and seriously wounded three, including a police officer, at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin on Sunday as worshippers prepared for religious services. A police officer shot Page dead.

The "name that is out there is accurate," the source said. Fox News and CNN had previously identified him.

Authorities said they were treating the attack as an act of domestic terrorism. American Sikhs said they have often been singled out for harassment, and occasionally violent attack, since the September 11, 2001, attacks because of their colorful turbans and beards.

U.S. military sources said Page had been discharged from the Army in 1998 for "patterns of misconduct" and had been cited for being drunk on duty.

Page had served in the military for six years but was never posted overseas. He was a psychological operations specialist and missile repairman who was last stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the sources said.

In June 1998 he was disciplined for being drunk on duty and had his rank reduced to specialist from sergeant. He was not eligible to re-enlist.

Page had been a member of the racist skinhead band End Apathy, based in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in 2010, said Heidi Beirich, director of the intelligence project at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama.

Page also tried to buy goods from the National Alliance, a neo-Nazi group, in 2000, she said. The SPLC describes the National Alliance on its website as "perhaps the most dangerous and best organized neo-Nazi formation in America."

In a 2010 online interview with End Apathy's record label Label56, Page said he had founded the band in 2005 because "I realized ... that if we could figure out how to end people's apathetic ways it would be the start towards moving forward."

Police were searching an apartment at a duplex in the Cudahy neighborhood near Milwaukee, presumed to be the residence of the gunman. Generators and floodlights were set up along the street and a bomb squad was on the scene.

The names of the victims were not made public pending notification of relatives, although members said the president of the congregation and a priest were among the victims.

Oak Creek Police Chief John Richards told CNN the gunman "lived in a community neighboring ours, we're doing a 24-hour backcheck, just to get any idea what he was up to, what he was doing.

"Right now there is no indication that there were any red flags."

The wounded police officer had been shot eight or nine times in the face and extremities at close range with a handgun. None of the wounds were life-threatening, Edwards said.

CNN said Page legally owned the gun that was used in the shooting.

A search of the Lexis-Nexis online records service showed that Page had lived at least 20 addresses in Wisconsin, North Carolina, Colorado, California and Texas.

9MM HANDGUN

Authorities said the gunman had used a 9mm semi-automatic pistol, which was recovered at the scene. They were trying to track the origin of the weapon.

Wisconsin has some of the most permissive gun laws in the country. It passed a law in 2011 allowing citizens to carry a concealed weapon.


http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/ ... FP20120806

A May 2010 interview Sikh Temple shooter Wade Page gave to promote his hard-core punk band End Apathy reveals a man who felt he was holding himself back when it came to accomplishing "positive results . . . in our sick society."

The interview was conducted by "Rick 56" from End Apathy's record label Label 56, which bills itself on its website as promoting "cultural change through music and activism." In the interview, Page said he started the band in 2005 "to figure out what it would take to actually accomplish positive results in society and what is holding us back."

"A lot of what I realized at the time was that if we could figure out how to end people's apathetic ways it would be the start towards moving forward," Page is quoted as saying. "Of course after that it requires discipline, strict discipline, to stay the course in our sick society.

"But I didn't want to just point the finger at what other people should do, but also I was willing to point out some of my faults on how I was holding myself back."

That sentiment, he says in the interview, inspired the song "Self Destruct."

Page also says his band's songs "vary from sociological issues, religion and how the value of human life has been degraded by being submissive to tyranny and hypocrisy that we are subjugated to."

You can read more of Page's interview at the Uprise Direct blog. The blog, as well as the Label 56 site, both promoted End Apathy men's and women's shirt, 7-inch vinyl and sticker combos last month.

Sources with the Sikh Temple shooting investigation have identified Page, 40, as the man who shot and killed six people Sunday at the Sikh Temple in Oak Creek. He served in the Army for several years and was assigned to psychological operations, or PsyOps, according to the sources.


http://www.jsonline.com/news/crime/2010 ... 32146.html
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby American Dream » Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:50 am

http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/08/06/ ... supremacy/

August 06, 2012

Shooting at the Gurdwara
The Sense of White Supremacy

by VIJAY PRASHAD

Yesterday morning the orgies of the lone gunman took hold in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, a town in the dragnet of Milwaukee. He targeted a Gurdwara, the religious home of the local Sikh community. The gunman entered the Gurdwara, and as if in mimicry of the school shootings, stalked the worshippers in the halls of the 17,000 square foot “Sikh Temple of Wisconsin.” Police engaged the gunman, who wounded at least one officer. The gunman killed at least seven Sikhs, wounding many more. He was then killed. A few hours after the shooting Ven Boba Ri, a committee member of the Gurdwara told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, “It’s pretty much a hate crime. It’s not an insider.”

The local police smartly said that this is an act of domestic terrorism. The FBI concurred.

This is the not the first act of violence against Sikhs in the United States.

That story begins in the 19th century, when Sikhs migrated to the US, fleeing British colonialism for far-flung pastures. Many landed along the western coast of the United States, working alongside Japanese, Mexican and Filipino workers to make California into a fruit-producer and Oregon and Washington into major lumber producers. But they were not welcomed. Riots in Bellingham, Washington (1907) and Live Oak, California (1908) targeted the “rag heads,” the turban-wearing Sikhs. The mob “stormed makeshift Indian residences, stoned Indian workers and successfully orchestrated the non-involvement of local police.” The Bellingham Morning Reveille ran a drawing of a “Sikh” man with the caption, “This is the type of man driven from this city as the result of last night’s demonstration by a mob of 500 men and boys.” It was a mark of pride to have cleansed the city of the Sikhs.

The Sikhs didn’t take this lying down. A decade later, one Sikh man bragged, “I used to go to Maryville every Saturday. One day a ghora [white man] came out of a bar and motioned to me, saying, ‘Come here, slave!’ I said I was no slave man. He told me that his race ruled India and I hit him and got away fast.”

Anti-Sikh violence does not reside only in the early part of the 20th century. It returned a century later, when, after 9/11, Sikh men and women were targeted once more for their turban and head-scarf. Since Osama Bin Laden wore a turban, it was the turban that attracted the racist to the Sikhs. As I note in Uncle Swami, within the first week after 9/11, a disproportionately large number of the 645 bias attacks took place against Sikhs. The statement on the Oak Creek shootings that came from the activist group South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT) drew a straight line between the post-9/11 violence and this attack, “While the facts are still emerging, this event serves as a tragic reminder of violence in the form of hate crimes that Sikhs and many members of the South Asian community have endured since September 11th, 2001.”

Two quick reactions to the Oak Creek violence raised the hackles of some of the sharp organizers in the South Asian American community:

* This was an act of senseless violence. “No,” said Rinku Sen, publisher of Colorlines magazines. This is not “senseless,” she noted, but “racist.” This is the fifty-seventh mass shooting in the past thirty years in the United States. Each one is treated as the work of a freak. Patterns are shunned. Structural factors such as the prevalence of guns and the lack of social care for mentally disturbed people should of course be in the frame. But so too should the preponderance of socially acceptable hatred against those seen as outsiders. Intellectually respectable opinions about who is an American (produced, for example, by Sam Huntington, Who Are We? The Challenge to National Identity) comes alongside the politician’s casual racism (Romney’s recent suggestion that the US and the UK are “part of an Anglo-Saxon heritage,” erased in a whip lash the diversity of the United States and Britain). Racist attacks are authorized by a political culture that allows us to think in nativist terms, to bemoan the “browning” of America. By 2034, the Census department estimates, the non-white population of the US is going to be in the majority. With the political class unwilling to reverse the tide of jobless growth and corporate power, the politicians stigmatize the outsider as the problem of poverty and exploitation. This stigmatization, as Moishe Postone argues, obscures “the role played by capitalism in the reproduction of grief.” Far easier to let the Sikhs and the Latinos, the Muslims and the Africans bear the social cost for economic hopelessness and political powerlessness than to target the real problem: the structures that benefit the 1% and allow them to luxuriate in Richistan.

* Sikhs are not Muslims. The second argument, now clichéd, is to make the case that this is violence at the wrong address. Sikhs did nothing wrong, they are peace-loving and so on. It assumes that there are people who did do something wrong, are war-mongering and therefore deserve to be targeted. The liberal gesture of innocence has within it the sharp edge of Islamaphobia. It seems to suggest that Muslims are the ones who should bear this violence, since their ilk did the attacks on 9/11 and they are, all two billion of them, at war with the United States. The attack on Sikhs is not a mistaken attack. Sikhs are not mistaken for Muslims, but seen as part of the community of outsiders who are, as Patrick Buchanan puts it in States of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America, “a fifth column inside the belly of the beast…Should America lose her ethnic-cultural core and become a nation of nations, America will not survive.” Wisconsin’s Governor Scott Walker is not far from all this, being a fan of the Arizona anti-human legislation. The Sikh Coalition, an anti-bias group, is fully aware that this is not simply a situation of mistaken identity. Its 2008 report, Making Our Voices Heard, notes that although it is not the case that Sikhs are members of the Taliban or clones of Bin Laden, it is this recurrent identification that has by now “created an environment in which Sikhs are regularly singled out for abuse and mistreatment by both private and, at times, public actors.” Strikingly, forty-one percent of Sikhs in New York City reported being called derogatory names, half of the Sikh children reported being teased or harassed because of their Sikh identity and one hundred percent of Sikhs report having to endure secondary screenings at some US airports.

Sapreet Kaur of the Sikh Coalition offered her take of the situation, “There have been multiple hate crime shootings within the Sikh community in recent years and the natural impulse of our community is to unfortunately assume the same in this case.”



Vijay Prashad is the author of Uncle Swami: South Asians in America Today (New Press, 2012).
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby 2012 Countdown » Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:57 am

Sikh Temple Massacre: Multiple Shooters and Domestic Terrorism
Kurt Nimmo | Details point to DHS “rightwing extremism” domestic terrorism narrative.

Was the Sikh Temple Shooting Suspect Also Dosed Up on Legal Drugs?
Anthony Gucciardi | It’s important that we take a serious look at the link between shootings and the abuse of ‘legal’ drugs.

Sikh Shooting Ties Into DHS ‘Veterans as Terrorists’ Narrative
Paul Joseph Watson | Lone gunman identified as US Army vet while reports of multiple shooters ignored.

Shooting at Sikh temple: who benefits big-time?
Jon Rappoport | The official and repeating scenario (“we believe there was only one shooter”) has already been contradicted.

Surrounded By Psychopaths And Sociopaths As We Approach Societal Collapse
Michael Snyder | Do you remember when America was a place where you could attend a public gathering without having to worry if a sociopath was going to set off a bomb or start wildly shooting people?

---

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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby barracuda » Mon Aug 06, 2012 12:53 pm

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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby barracuda » Mon Aug 06, 2012 1:00 pm

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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby 82_28 » Mon Aug 06, 2012 3:33 pm

Wade Michael Page called Holmes Avenue home, and use to live in Littleton, Colorado, where Columbine occurred. He was a former psychological operations specialist out of Ft. Bragg, Fayetteville, North Carolina.

Here are other random notes about Page, from a variety of sources:

Wade is of Old English and Scandinavian origin, and the meaning of Wade is "able to go; river ford," and/or "advancer."
Page is described as a "heavily-tattooed, 40-year-old ex-Army soldier." Neighbors told Fox News that he had a 9-11 tattoo. He had all kinds of symbolic tattoos.

"Page said he was born in Colorado," according to an interview he gave.

Page use to live in Littleton, Colorado, he said.

He was a former US Army "psychological operations specialist," the Pentagon confirmed.


http://copycateffect.blogspot.com/2012/ ... -page.html

Yep. I've relayed the story here before. I'll kind of tell it again.

In the 90's in Colorado, especially the well to do south end of Denver, the K*K made all kinds of inexplicable inroads to the youth. It was kinda like Mormon missionary shit, I'm talking about here. Littleton CO is my hometown. I went to Littleton Public Schools (I wonder where this asshole went to HS at -- probably in my district). All of a sudden, various friends succumbed to this weird ass white power nonsense and it was widespread. They were summarily rejected and they used this rejection as a badge of courage. Luckily, the three friends I had (and rejected like everyone else at the time), fell out of it and renounced their racism. But little ol' 82_28 had three friends he used to skate, smoke, drink with join the K*K just about my senior year of HS. I never understood how it happened. I've always known it didn't happen in a vacuum. At least back then, who knows now, there was a very strong anti-racist youth culture as well, probably in response to so much K*K recruiting and seeing people we grew up with, as I said, succumb to some concerted effort to spread it around.

Oh fuck, I just remembered one thing, but I have to run real fast. I'll tell y'all about it in a sec. . .
There is no me. There is no you. There is all. There is no you. There is no me. And that is all. A profound acceptance of an enormous pageantry. A haunting certainty that the unifying principle of this universe is love. -- Propagandhi
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby elfismiles » Mon Aug 06, 2012 4:22 pm


Wisconsin Temple Gunman ID'd, But Cops Seek Another 'Person of Interest'
By RUSSELL GOLDMAN, KEVIN DOLACK, LUIS MARTINEZ AND JASON RYAN | ABC News – 8 hrs ago..

Image
The "person of interest" in the Sikh temple shooting as identified by authorities.


Former soldier Wade Michael Page was identified today as the lone gunman who killed six people at a Sikh religious center in Oak Creek, Wisc., but police said they are also seeking a "person of interest" who was seen at the site of the massacre shortly after the shooting stopped.

Page was described by authorities today as an Army veteran who left the service with a general discharge following a "pattern of misconduct," including being AWOL and drunk while on duty. The terms of his discharge would not allow him to reenlist.

Officials said they believe Page alone was responsible for Sunday's shooting, but today distributed a photograph of an unknown man they described as "person of interest."

"This individual showed up at the scene after the shooting," said Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards. Witnesses said the man looked "suspicious" and he "left the scene before anyone could ascertain what he was doing there."

Page, 40, served in the Army from April 1992 through October 1998, during which he was demoted from sergeant to specialist.

While in the Army Wade served in Ft. Bliss in Texas and at Ft. Bragg in North Carolina. Wade's job was as a Hawk missile system repairman, and he then became a psychological operations specialist, defense official confirmed to ABC news.

The ex-soldier is believed to be the gunman who opened fire on people at the Sikh temple around 10:30 a.m. Sunday morning and killed six people. The victims ranged in age from 39 to 84.

He also ambushed police Lt. Brian Murphy, shooting him eight or nine times, Edwards said. Murphy is expected to survive. Two other gunshot victims are in critical condition, police said.

Page was shot dead by police when he was ordered to drop his weapon and began firing at them instead.

Police have not given any details on the motive of the shooter, but Teresa Carlson, the FBI's special agent in charge, said today, "We are looking at ties to white supremacist groups."

Earlier, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco; Firearms Special Agent Thomas Ahern said Page had tattoos that suggested he had ties to white supremacists.

Page is fronted a white supremacist rock band called End Apathy, according to watchdog group the Southern Poverty Law Center.

SPLC also determined that in 2000, Page attempted to purchase goods from the neo-Nazi group the National Alliance, described as America's then "most important hate group."

In 2010, Page gave an interview to white-power website Label 56. Page wrote songs with titles like "Self Destruct" and "Usefull [sic] Idiots."

"The inspiration was based on frustration that we have the potential to accomplish so much more as individuals and a society in whole," Page told Label 56.

The ATF today said Page legally purchased the 9mm handgun with multiple ammunition magazines, he used during the rampage. The weapon bought at The Shooters Shop in West Allis, Wisc., sources told ABC News.

Carlson and other officials said investigators had no "reason to believe" Page was planning Sunday's attack.

"We didn't have an active investigation into him prior to yesterday," she told reporters today.

On Sunday the FBI and a bomb squad arrived at a home in Cudahy, Wis., near Oak Creek, and ABC News Milwaukee affiliate WISN reported the action appeared to be related to the temple shootings earlier in the day.

"The officer stopped a tragic event that could've been a lot worse," Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards told reporters.

Four people were found dead inside the temple and two others were found dead outside the building.

Edwards said authorities were treating the event as a domestic terrorism incident and the FBI would be conducting a full investigation.

Individuals attending Sunday services at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin, just south of Milwaukee, fled in all directions this morning when a gunman entered and began firing. Many hid in bathrooms or other rooms within the temple while the shooter attacked, according to police.

The president of the temple, Satwant Singh Kaleka, was preparing to deliver remarks when he became one of the shooting victims. His son, Amardeep Kaleka, spoke by phone with ABC News shortly after getting a call from the priest using his father's phone.

"I picked it up immediately thinking it was my dad, but it was the priest and he was standing right next to him," Kaleka said. "He told me right away that right now my father can't speak. There's too much blood coming out of his back area and we have to get ambulances in there right away."

Soon, he heard briefly from his mother, also in hiding in the temple and asking for information about his father.

For images of the police response and ripples of shock and grief at the scene, click here.

Sikh Temple Shooting: 'Ignorance Is Not Going to Get Us Anywhere'

Members of the Sikh community in Milwaukee expressed outrage at the shooting.

"They went to church not knowing that they might die today," said Simran Kaleka, whose family was in the temple, according to ABC News Radio. "I don't know how sick you have to be to do that, and I don't know if it was directed toward the Sikh culture and them having turbans and having beards, but ignorance is not going to get us anywhere."

For images of the police response and ripples of shock and grief at the scene, click here.

The wounded president of the temple, Satwant Singh Kaleka, had recently hosted state Rep. Josh Zepnick and the county district attorney to discuss a recent rise in violence against area Sikhs at their stores and businesses, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

"It's gut wrenching," Zepnick said today in response to the shooting. "It certainly makes you wonder about how just how far this epidemic of gun violence goes, where innocent people's lives are put at risk in ordinary day-to-day situations. it makes me sick to my stomach."

On Sundays, Sikh temples, called gurudwaras, serve a community meal at which anyone is welcome as part of their community service. The meal, known as a langar, follows the morning services.

The Sikh religion originated in the Punjab region of India.

ABC News' Richard Esposito contributed to this report



http://news.yahoo.com/sikh-temple-gunma ... ories.html
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby 2012 Countdown » Mon Aug 06, 2012 4:37 pm

I have heard audio, and it was said that there were 4 shooters, fwiw.
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby justdrew » Mon Aug 06, 2012 5:07 pm

well... fyi...

the son of one of the men killed, Kaleka, is an emmy award winner working on Dr. Steven Greer's new doc called Sirius


the dad... http://instagram.com/p/N-XYysp60M/
:tear
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby elfismiles » Mon Aug 06, 2012 6:06 pm

justdrew wrote:well... fyi...

the son of one of the men killed, Kaleka, is an emmy award winner working on Dr. Steven Greer's new doc called Sirius


the dad... http://instagram.com/p/N-XYysp60M/
:tear


WHOA, six degrees (or less) of separation on everything now...

viewtopic.php?p=473337#p473337

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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby Mummy » Mon Aug 06, 2012 6:32 pm

I always worried about this town.

By Meg Kissinger of the Journal Sentinel
June 2, 2012
Darius Simmons was like a lot of 13-year-old boys - funny, boisterous and a little braggy.
Pictures show him chomping on a piece of pizza, hugging a cat and goofing with his friends.
"He was a jokester, loving and funny," said Toni Clark, who taught him sixth grade at Gaenslen Elementary School in Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood.
His friends and family gathered Saturday to remember him in front of the house he moved into 29 days before he was gunned down while retrieving a trash can from the street.
John Henry Spooner, his 75-year-old next-door neighbor, is charged with first-degree murder in the boy's death. Spooner, a widower who has been diagnosed with cancer, had complained to Ald. Bob Donovan about a break-in at his home earlier in the week, blaming the family next door.
Spooner admitted to police that he shot Darius on Thursday morning, even as the boy had held up his arms and ran away.
"It's very disturbing," Donovan said Saturday. "John lived in the neighborhood a long time. I never knew him to so much as loiter or spit on the street."
The houses sit 15 feet apart on the 1900 block of W. Arrow St., a traditional south side neighborhood of modest wood-framed houses, small lawns and tall ash trees. A prayer service and news conference drew more than 50 people Saturday afternoon.
"The violence has to stop," said Leondis Fuller of New Covenant Holistic Ministries, who said his three sons have been murdered in Milwaukee since 1993. "We are taking lives away too lightly. God's people are suffering. The suffering has to stop."
Patricia Larry, Darius' mother, sat on a chair on the front lawn, sobbing as family members fanned her and wiped her forehead with a wet cloth.
Betty McCuiston, Darius' aunt, said the boy was in school Tuesday when someone broke in to Spooner's house and stole some guns. She said police searched Darius' house after he was shot but did not find any of Spooner's guns.
"He was gunned down for something he did not do," she said.
McCuiston said her sister moved to the neighborhood on May 1 from the north side because she wanted something quieter and safer than her old neighborhood.
Darius talked about going to Milwaukee Tech high school, said Clark, the teacher.
"He was determined to get a good education," she said, noting that he often rode his bike more than seven miles each way to go to school.
"Once he had me watch him on the playground to show me how far he could throw a football," she said, smiling.
On the day of the shooting, Darius was home from school because he did not feel well, McCuiston said. She said he went outside to bring the trash can back in from the street when Spooner confronted him about the stolen guns. The boy denied stealing them, and his mother, who was also outside, told Spooner to leave them alone.
Spooner then pulled out a gun and shot the boy twice, the criminal complaint alleges. Darius died a few hours later.
McCuiston said the family is angry - at the police for not being more responsive to Spooner's original complaint about the break-in at his house, at Donovan for not doing more, and especially at Spooner.
"No mother should have to sit in a hospital and wait for the doctor to come out and say that she is sorry but he did not make it," McCuiston said.
Some of Darius' sixth-grade friends decorated a wooden cross with stuffed animals and planted it on the front step, the precise spot where Darius stood as he was shot. They tied a balloon to the top with the word "LOVE" written on the front. The balloon swirled in the late spring breeze.
"We have to talk to each other as neighbors," said Jose Perez, an alderman for the area. "We need to do a better job communicating with one another. One neighbor is dead, another is in jail."
McCuiston said she agreed with that.
"I don't think God designed for a mother to bury her 13-year-old son," she said.
Spooner was arraigned in Milwaukee County Circuit Court on Saturday morning, where he was told that he is charged with first-degree intentional homicide, use of a dangerous weapon.
A court commissioner found there is probable cause to hold Spooner on the charge and set cash bail at $300,000.
No representative for Spooner could be reached for comment Saturday.
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby wordspeak2 » Mon Aug 06, 2012 9:12 pm

Some of the usual crowd are pointing to the death of Stephen Greer's co-producer's father and saying likely psy-op. Sounds like a stretch... the father of a UFO film producer? Is he going to stop making the movie because his dad died? On the other hand, seems like quite a coincidence, as it were. That's some WOO. The fundraising promo Kaleka and Greer have out there for their 2012 UFO disclosure film:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9QPDQI4XU8
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby Freitag » Mon Aug 06, 2012 9:29 pm

All the news I've heard pronounces "Sikh" as "sick", which is annoying ("shooting at the sick temple"). There are a lot of Sikhs in my area, and I've only ever heard it pronounced "seek".
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Re: Shooting at Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

Postby MacCruiskeen » Mon Aug 06, 2012 9:34 pm

wordspeak2 wrote:Some of the usual crowd are pointing to the death of Stephen Greer's co-producer's father and saying likely psy-op. Sounds like a stretch... the father of a UFO film producer? Is he going to stop making the movie because his dad died? On the other hand, seems like quite a coincidence, as it were. That's some WOO. The fundraising promo Kaleka and Greer have out there for their 2012 UFO disclosure film:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9QPDQI4XU8


Six degrees of separation. In any mass murder, especially in the USA, at least one of the victims is very likely to be in some way related to someone who is in some way opposed to the government, or who in some way works for the government, or who in some way is interested in UFOs, or who in some way is involved in the movie business.

Certainly I can think of easier ways of deterring someone from making a film.
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