A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Moderators: DrVolin, 82_28, Elvis, Jeff

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:44 am

User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Wed Jan 31, 2018 3:30 pm




In this clip from "The Murder of Fred Hampton," Fred Hampton participates in a mock people's trial. In it, he articulates why the Black Panther Party, and he as a leader within the party, are being viciously targeted, even over and against other political movements of his day.

The central issue is that the BPP was not focused specifically on the issue of racism against black people but against oppression. Hampton and others were for people of any color who were oppressed and against any oppressor regardless of their color as well. They were even willing to take up arms of the oppressor illegally bothered the people. This represented a very direct challenge to the state and was an attitude that refused to fall into the "divide and conquer" trap many oppressors use against oppressed people.

Perhaps my favorite part of this scene is where Hampton succinctly explains how the oppressor has divided the oppressed along racial lines (among others) to keep people fighting against each other instead of recognizing their common interest and rising up together against the true threat and injustices they are all victims of.

Hampton was assassinated by the U.S. Government at the age of 21 for his political beliefs.
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Fri Feb 16, 2018 5:51 pm

The Othered Oscars: Some Favorite Films of 2017

By Eve Mitchell

[SPOILER ALERT!!! The endings to all films are ruined in this article.]

Get Out

Image

Much has been written about 2017’s best film, Get Out. Many have argued that Get Out expresses contemporary black lived experiences in subtle and direct forms, from interpersonal micro-aggressions to systemic white supremacist violence (and the direct connections between the two). Chris, a talented black photographer visits the family home of his white girlfriend, Rose, in suburban upstate New York––against the warnings of his best friend, Rod. The other black people who Chris encounters upstate have a robotic / Stepford Wives quality to them and don’t react to Chris’ attempts to share black cultural social cues.

On his first night in the house, Chris is hypnotized by Rose’s mother and sent to a “sunken place” where he is no longer in control of his body but can see from afar the things he is being made to do. Rose’s mother pushes him into the sunken place by forcing him to relive his darkest memories, his own mother’s death and his deep-seeded belief that it was his fault (she bled to death in the street while he sat watching TV).

Throughout the film there are foreboding subtleties that build the racial tension: early on, we encounter an explicitly racist cop and grow to question Rose’s well meaning but potentially dangerous interventions. An implicit link is made between deer overpopulation and black genocide. Chris is called “boy,” and “my man” and comments are made about it being a “privilege to be able to take part in someone else’s culture,” and about Chris’ “genetic makeup” and ability to be a “beast” fighter, and that “black is in fashion,” etc. Chris’ racial othering is evoked in nearly every scene.

As the story unfolds, Chris is auctioned off to a blind art dealer who will use Chris’ body, and his eyes in particular, via brain transplant. Chris realizes he is not the first black person to be colonized in this way; he learns that his experience is part of a larger conspiracy with aging white people warding off death by taking over black peoples’ bodies. Here, white subjectivity becomes a literal negation of black people’s life force. As Chris discovers this fact, his friend Rod uncovers the plot and comes to get him. In the end, Chris escapes, killing Rose’s family. He refuses to leave one of the black servants to die in the street but decides to leave Rose in that state––not dead but dying and bleeding out. This is significant because it was the state in which Chris’ mother died. He makes a deliberate choice to do the worst thing he can possibly think of to Rose; it is racial revenge in its sweetest form.

Director Jordan Peele blends horror, comedy and thriller, referencing a variety of films, including most notably, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner and Stepford Wives, updating their political content. By constructing a horror story about the theft of black lives in the liberal suburbs, the film makes an explicit critique of so-called “post-racial” society and liberal white supremacy. It uncovers the shady racism, anchored to explicit and systemic white supremacy, that permeates the everyday life of black people in the U.S. There are many increasing examples of hardcore, direct white supremacists. However, the white supremacist structures which would remain under President Oprah Winfrey, for example, are equally dangerous for black people in America, even they are not as flagrant as confederate flags and Nazi salutes. Get Out gestures at this. Before Chris figures out what is going on, and as Rod is investigating what’s happening, it is implicit that there are some black upper class, or upwardly mobile, people who have “internalized” whiteness, engaging with white people in ways that they would not if their primary community was working class black people. Chris is weirded out by the other black people in Rose’s family’s social circles, but it isn’t until he actually recognizes one of them that he entertains the idea that they are being controlled. So the film contains a warning: don’t get caught up in white people world, because you will lose yourself in the process and become part of the system that oppresses you and others like you.

Get Out is a brilliant example of the horror of the everyday we experience in our moment. It illuminates a master-slave dialectic––white people absorb black people’s essence, longing to physically embody black people, while at the same time destroying black people’s very existence. Afro-pessimists define this experience as “social death,” a lack of access to full humanity, historically rooted in slavery. Similarly, Fanon describes an objectification where a black person exists only for a white person’s use. White people find their subjectivity (meaning their ability to decidedly act upon the world around them) through the negation of black people; through absorbing their human creative potential. This process is quite literal in Get Out, as Chris is being auctioned off not only because “black is in fashion,” (fashion being a form of labor) but because of his photography talents. Similarly, the sunken place expresses what Fanon conceives as “triple consciousness.” From this space, Chris watches his oppressors watch him; he is acutely aware of his reduction to an object, and he is unable to intervene. These are the material conditions of racialized capitalism: black people (young men in particular) are imprisoned en masse, un- and under-employed, murdered in the streets by police and other white supremacist forces. The economic crisis is deepening and continues to slough off the most devalued, abject layers of society. This everyday horror can feel like being buried alive, isolated in a hole, a dark and depressed underworld where you lie suspended and frozen.

It is interesting that Peele chose to end the film on a hopeful note (he entertained other, more pessimistic endings). Through violence, Chris is able to reclaim his subjectivity, something that Fanon argues for in Wretched of the Earth. This implies that a fight and struggle is necessary, and that it is possible for black people to assert their humanity and be victorious. This tug of war between pessimism and optimism very much represents today’s social consciousness. On the one hand, today’s fractured and precarious working class lacks a clear “common interest,” and a clear political vanguard (in the way that Black Power organically rose to the forefront of class struggle in the 1960s); on the other hand, we are pressed to seek out global struggles that pose new and interesting solutions to the class formation problem. Similarly, the debate between afro-pessimism and black optimism highlights this black negation and potentials for the negation of black negation. Get Out simultaneously holds both sides of this debate, highlighting nihilistic and gross social death alongside a sense of comic hope.


https://blindfieldjournal.com/2018/02/1 ... s-of-2017/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:42 am

Black Panther’: The masking of Oakland’s Panthers
February 21, 2018
by The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey


Many in my generation remember the ‘83 classic movie “Scarface,” which was one of the biggest commercials promoting the selling of cocaine ever made. Black and Brown young people wanted to be Al Pacino in “Scarface” until “New Jack City,” thus fueling the psychology behind the crack explosion of the ‘80s-‘90s.

But “Scarface” was also important because the movie started off with an unnecessary scene of a Fidel Castro speech with scenes from the Mariel boatlift of 1980. The story included Fidel’s speech because it was important for the government through Hollywood to get the youth in the U.S. and around the world to identify with Alpha 66 and the treacherous Gusano Cubans who worked with the CIA in the Bay of Pigs and lost against Castro’s forces, resulting in their capture and release years later to Miami. Remember, that is how “Scarface” starts.

In ‘71 at the height of the Panther revolutionary phenomenon, “Shaft” is released, a movie about a Black police officer who dresses like the Panthers. When people are talking about changing the conditions in the community in a revolutionary way, Hollywood tries to introduce a cool cop. Coincidence?

The Black Panther Party and Huey’s image specifically was again attacked through the medium of Hollywood with the ‘73 movie “The Mack.” Was it a coincidence that the character the Mack was from Oakland, looked like Huey, sounded like Huey, had problems with the Ward brothers like Huey and had a mentoring relationship with the children in the neighborhood like Huey did, with the Panther liberation school. Coincidence?

In 2001, Spike Lee wrote and directed another hit piece on Huey, in a “A Huey P. Newton story,” where he profiled Huey as a chronic cigarette smoking lunatic who co-founded the Black Panther Party. Hollywood’s attacks have proceeded to this very day.

In 2013, Coogler’s “Frutivale Station” was a good movie. It just wasn’t about what made the Oscar Grant anti-police terrorism movement start, which is what blew the name up for Hollywood to want to make the movie in the first place.

On Jan. 7, 2009, downtown Oakland erupted because after seven days then Mayor Ron Dellums refused to call for the indictment of the Oakland police officer Johannes Mehserle, the triggerman who shot the fatal bullet into Oscar Grant. For the most part, the rally-protesting movement and the street rebels were two different groups except for a few people protesting the police murder. I was among that few.

I went to Santa Rita, fought a trumped up arson case for 13 months, while also continuing to report on what was going on with the Mehserle trial for KPFA, KPOO and the SF Bay View among other outlets around the country, from the Bay to LA for over a year. The people were fighting on both fronts, not because they knew of how “angelic” Oscar was, as he was portrayed in the “Fruitvale Station” film, but because he was another nameless and faceless Black man murdered by the police. The people’s fight was not portrayed at all.

Consciously for some and perhaps unconsciously for others, it was a million dollar attempt by Hollywood to distract the people worldwide, those too young to understand, and those soon to come, as to the scope of what the Oakland rebels of ‘09 were fighting against: state sponsored police terrorism. Ask children under 12 who Oscar Grant is, and they will tell you a fictional Hollywood story instead of about the three street rebellions and the hundreds of protesters, including Lovelle Mixon murdering four Oakland police officer two months after Oscar was killed. Is it a coincidence that none of those things made it to the movie?

The overall political message of “Black Panther” tells you that since you cannot be the Black Panther character, king of Wakanda, you can be a CIA agent like T’Challa’s right hand man, the next best thing. How is it that people who are against police terrorism have become pro-CIA in this case, when the CIA is simply one of many international police agencies for white supremacy?

Some would say that it’s only a movie, and I would respond that corporations spend millions on advertisements at the Superbowl for a reason. The military, intelligence and law enforcement agencies work with Hollywood to convince you that they are our friends and they are not killing us by the millions around the world.

Look at “CSI,” “Mission Impossible,” “James Bond,” “The Avengers,” “Batman,” “The First 48,” “Ride Along,” “21 Jump Street,” “Top Gun,” “Black Panther” and the rollcall is endless. They are always selling you something.

It may be a product; it may be a political idea. In most cases it’s both. If you don’t catch the subliminals and sometimes even if you do, psychology tells us it can be lodged in your subconscious without you or your children even knowing.

The military, intelligence and law enforcement agencies work with Hollywood to convince you that they are our friends and they are not killing us by the millions around the world.

Now when you type “Black Panther” into YouTube, there is no Huey, Bobby, Lil Bobby, Assata, Sekou, Kathleen, Ericka, Mumia, Sundiata, Herman, Jalil, Afeni or any of the others that gave up their lives and freedom for us; there are only comic book characters for the first few hundred videos. What a brilliant COINTELPRO* move.

“There will never be another Black messiah unless we create him,” predicted J. Edgar Hoover, former director of the FBI and chief architect of COINTELPRO.


Image
Here are some of the real Black Panthers, most of them still in prison for having the courage to serve their people. Will “Black Panther,” the movie, bring them and their decades-long struggle for justice for themselves and their people to the public eye? Will we organize to free them at last so they can bring their wisdom back to the streets and the people they love?


http://sfbayview.com/2018/02/black-pant ... -panthers/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Tue Feb 27, 2018 5:37 am

FBI Tracks & Arrests ‘Black Identity Extremist’ and Hardly Anyone Is Talking About It

David Love
February 5, 2018
Atlanta Black Star


Six months after the FBI issued a report inventing from whole cloth the term Black Identity Extremists — claiming this group poses a terrorist threat to police — the first apparent case of the prosecution of a BIE has emerged. The BIE designation has created concern in the Black community that the FBI is launching a new COINTELPRO program targeting Black activists who have committed no crimes, with more arrests and prosecutions of those involved in racial justice movements to follow.

Image
Facebook posting,
My son says I dress like an African War Lord.


This latest chapter represents the FBI that has been familiar to Black people for decades. While the bureau only recently created the term Black Identity Extremist, its methods, tactics and orientation remain the same with regard to Black activists. The FBI has a long tradition of treating Black political movements as terrorists and enemies of the state, and a threat to national security and public safety. A conservative, white-male-dominated organization, the FBI always has taken its cues from anti-Black, right-wing propagandists.

On December 12, 2017 in Dallas, Christopher Daniels, also known as Rakem Balogun, was arrested during a raid on his home and charged with the unlawful possession of a firearm, the result of more than two years of FBI surveillance, as Foreign Policy reported. Federal agents held Daniels outside in his underwear and seized two firearms the government claims he is barred from owning due to a 2007 misdemeanor domestic assault conviction in Tennessee. Among other items FBI agents took from Daniels’ home was a copy of the book “Negroes With Guns” by civil rights activist Robert F. Williams.

Williams was the first Black leader of his era to support armed resistance to racial oppression. Following the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, Williams had revived the Monroe, North Carolina, chapter of the NAACP amid Ku Klux Klan violence. In response to assaults on Black women that were ignored by police, he organized Black workers and veterans, filed for a charter from the NRA and formed the Black Armed Guard. The group repelled Klan violence against integration and protected the Freedom Riders. Williams also internationalized the Black struggle, as he and his family lived in Cuba — where he wrote his book and produced Radio Free Dixie — and China for a number of years. “I advocated violent self-defense because I don’t really think you can have a defense against violent racists and against terrorists unless you are prepared to meet violence with violence, and my policy was to meet violence with violence,” said Williams, a forefather of the Black Power movement and the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense.

The Huey P. Newton Gun Club, a pro-open-carry group of which Daniels is a founder, tweeted that Black political activists are being criminalized.

According to Foreign Policy, the FBI became interested in Daniels in 2015 from a video of him participating in a police brutality protest, which was posted on the right-wing conspiracy theory website InfoWars. Alex Jones, the Austin, Texas-based radio and TV show host who runs InfoWars, is a “valuable asset” to the Trump administration. Trump uses the conspiracy theorist as a news source, reportedly called Jones three times in recent months, and has praised Jones and his “amazing” reputation. Jones has claimed the Sandy Hook elementary school mass shooting and the Boston Marathon bombing were inside jobs and hoaxes, that President Obama was not born in the United States, and the government is making people gay. Jones was the source of Trump’s claim that millions of people voted illegally in the 2016 election. “I talk to the CIA, FBI connections, Army intelligence connections, former technical head of the NSA and a bunch of other people that talk to the president,” said Jones on his TV program. “I’m gonna leave it at that.”


Continues: http://atlantablackstar.com/2018/02/05/ ... e-talking/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Thu Mar 01, 2018 7:44 pm

Alex Jones: Africans “recede back to into total barbarism” without whites

ALEX JONES (HOST): Rhodesia, then Zimbabwe, all these other places, the Congo, first they nationalize, then they make the whites keep working on the land, then they kill them, then everything collapses, then they have multi-billion famous inflation. Why is Africa so corrupt once the evil colonists are kicked out? Then you should have Wakanda, it should be like spaceships and the vibranium and everything, which would be great.

I love Africa. It’s a beautiful country, I mean continent. A lot of beautiful countries. I want them to do well. Fellow humans. But this thing about get the whites out that brought the civilization. Why does it then recede back to into total barbarism, everybody starving, but the president’s son has 100 Lamborghinis.


https://www.mediamatters.org/video/2018 ... tes/219536
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Thu Apr 05, 2018 1:44 pm

The Strange, Tangled Web of Assassination Plots Against MLK

Before he was actually murdered, the civil rights legend was targeted for at least a decade by vile racists of all stripes, according to a new account.

Seth Ferranti
Apr 4 2018, 4:22pm


Image
Left Image: Mugshot of Samuel Bowers, head of the Mississippi White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Photo courtesy the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Center Image: MLK the year of his death. Photo by Bettmann/Contributor. Right Image: James Earl Ray months before his death.

One character who stands out here was Reverend Wesley Swift, the leader of Christian Identity crowd. Who would you compare him to in the annals of American life?
Stuart Wexler
: Thanks in part to Henry Ford and the Dearborn Independent, [this ideology] was sort of cemented after World War II, and it basically said that Jews and people of color were not really human beings worthy of Christian consideration. In fact, they were Satanic, the tools of Satan, and were part of a cosmic conspiracy against white Christians.

The person who made this popular was Wesley Swift: a very charismatic west-coast minister who was a combination of Rush Limbaugh and Father Coughlin. He had an enormously popular radio show that espoused Christian Identity beliefs that circulated in an informal social network of these racist radicals across the country. A big part of what he was talking about was that the end of times was coming. For the Christian Identity folks, the end of times is a race war. His followers were trying to make that race war happen.

Along with Swift’s Identity crowd and Bowers’s White Knights, there was at least one more, wackier sect in play here, right?
Larry Hancock
: The White Knights of Mississippi, Samuel Bowers’ folks, had been involved with people from the Dixie Mafia for a number of years. They used them to obtain weapons and would contract bombings from Dixie Mafia folks. They'd had those kind of connections for a number of years, but in 1964 that they ramped it up with a contract to kill Dr. King. The Dixie Mafia was only a mafia to the extent that they were a social and criminal social network that would farm jobs out to each other. If for some reason they weren't available, they had contact points where they could actually circulate the jobs and get a percentage or get the next job on the table. The White Knights worked with Dixie Mafia figures for of years. That shows up in the FBI files.

One thread here is your argument that the FBI uncovered leads that established the conspiracy, but failed to pursue them. Could they really have stopped this, though?
Stuart Wexler
: The FBI gets a tip in the summer of 1967 from a former prisoner, Donald Nissen, about a bounty offer on Martin Luther King's life. The FBI might not have had access to the same kind of data mining that we have access to now, but they should've at least asked some basic follow up questions that they did not ask. That’s a big problem. Remember that King's assassination created mass chaos in the country and the Attorney General came out with the party line that it was one lone nut, in part to try and pacify the county. Once they get their minds wrapped around the idea that it's James Earl Ray, it's only a matter of time before they start shutting down leads too.

They should've been giving serious follow up consideration to the person that we looked into, Donald Nissen, whose story was a pre-assassination story. They should have given it, not only more time pre-assassination, but they could have given it more time post-assassination. In the pre-assassination phase, they simply were at times quite frankly incompetent, and in the post-assassination phase there's quite a bit of pressure all around for them to close down conspiratorial angles and focus solely on Ray as the shooter.


More at: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/evqb ... gainst-mlk
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby MacCruiskeen » Thu Apr 05, 2018 3:36 pm

American Dream » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:44 pm wrote:
The Strange, Tangled Web of Assassination Plots Against MLK

Before he was actually murdered, the civil rights legend was targeted for at least a decade by vile racists of all stripes, according to a new account.

Seth Ferranti
Apr 4 2018, 4:22pm


Image
Left Image: Mugshot of Samuel Bowers, head of the Mississippi White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Photo courtesy the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Center Image: MLK the year of his death. Photo by Bettmann/Contributor. Right Image: James Earl Ray months before his death.

One character who stands out here was Reverend Wesley Swift, the leader of Christian Identity crowd. Who would you compare him to in the annals of American life?
Stuart Wexler
: Thanks in part to Henry Ford and the Dearborn Independent, [this ideology] was sort of cemented after World War II, and it basically said that Jews and people of color were not really human beings worthy of Christian consideration. In fact, they were Satanic, the tools of Satan, and were part of a cosmic conspiracy against white Christians.

The person who made this popular was Wesley Swift: a very charismatic west-coast minister who was a combination of Rush Limbaugh and Father Coughlin. He had an enormously popular radio show that espoused Christian Identity beliefs that circulated in an informal social network of these racist radicals across the country. A big part of what he was talking about was that the end of times was coming. For the Christian Identity folks, the end of times is a race war. His followers were trying to make that race war happen.

Along with Swift’s Identity crowd and Bowers’s White Knights, there was at least one more, wackier sect in play here, right?
Larry Hancock
: The White Knights of Mississippi, Samuel Bowers’ folks, had been involved with people from the Dixie Mafia for a number of years. They used them to obtain weapons and would contract bombings from Dixie Mafia folks. They'd had those kind of connections for a number of years, but in 1964 that they ramped it up with a contract to kill Dr. King. The Dixie Mafia was only a mafia to the extent that they were a social and criminal social network that would farm jobs out to each other. If for some reason they weren't available, they had contact points where they could actually circulate the jobs and get a percentage or get the next job on the table. The White Knights worked with Dixie Mafia figures for of years. That shows up in the FBI files.

One thread here is your argument that the FBI uncovered leads that established the conspiracy, but [b]failed to pursue them. Could they really have stopped this, though?
Stuart Wexler[/b]: The FBI gets a tip in the summer of 1967 from a former prisoner, Donald Nissen, about a bounty offer on Martin Luther King's life. The FBI might not have had access to the same kind of data mining that we have access to now, but they should've at least asked some basic follow up questions that they did not ask. That’s a big problem. Remember that King's assassination created mass chaos in the country and the Attorney General came out with the party line that it was one lone nut, in part to try and pacify the county. Once they get their minds wrapped around the idea that it's James Earl Ray, it's only a matter of time before they start shutting down leads too.

They should've been giving serious follow up consideration to the person that we looked into, Donald Nissen, whose story was a pre-assassination story. They should have given it, not only more time pre-assassination, but they could have given it more time post-assassination. In the pre-assassination phase, they simply were at times quite frankly incompetent, and in the post-assassination phase there's quite a bit of pressure all around for them to close down conspiratorial angles and focus solely on Ray as the shooter.


More at: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/evqb ... gainst-mlk


This is what happens when that execrable hipster-fasho rag VICE is one of your go-to trusted sources for political analysis: You get a version of the MLK assassination in which the poor innocent FBI is doing its level best, but golly gee, it just keeps tripping over its own gosh-darned feet.

Yet again, and so very predictably, "American Dream" regurgitates deliberate misdirection under a pseudo-"progressive" guise.
User avatar
MacCruiskeen
 
Posts: 9243
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2006 6:47 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:19 am

Right-Wing Media Promote An Anti-Semitic Extremist To Mock Starbucks Controversy

Image

Bryan Sharpe, who uses the moniker “Hotep Jesus” online, has acquired overnight support from right-wing media, but on the author page linked to his Twitter account, Sharpe, who is black, has aligned himself with the racist alt-right movement, expressed anti-Semitic beliefs and argued that “black culture is sure to create nothing but failure.”

On Sunday, Sharpe entered a Starbucks coffee shop to demand a free drink in response to outrage after two men were arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia after a manager called the police. The men were reportedly waiting for a business associate to arrive, did not order drinks, and had refused to leave when asked. In response, Starbuck announced it would close 8,000 stores in the United States for a day for racial-bias training.

Since Sharpe posted the video, it has been shared by conservative media sites like Drudge Report, Infowars, Independent Journal Review, TheBlaze, talk radio host Rush Limbaugh, WorldNetDaily, and Milo Yiannopoulous’ site Dangerous. Conservative commentators boosted the video because they believe it proved, as right-wing writer Ian Miles Cheong states, “the foolishness of Starbucks’ virtue signaling and white guilt.”

But none of these outlets mentioned Sharpe’s anti-Semitic views, his affiliations with white nationalists, or his belief in insane conspiracy theories.

In blog posts on his Hotep Nation website, Sharpe has aligned himself with the white nationalist alt-right movement. In a blog post last year, Sharpe wrote that the alt-right was “tired of hearing blacks cry about racial oppression,” adding, “You know it’s bad when I’d rather align with a racist white than a cry baby black.”

Later that year, after the white supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last year that resulted in the violent murder of Heather Heyer, Sharpe wrote in an update to that post that he believed the alt-right was “now under the control of the ‘deep-state’ or whomever is also controlling Black Lives Matter.” The post claims that “Hotep Nation does not and has never had an official alliance with Alt-Right,” yet also states that it “did not (still does not) have a problem with White Nationalists.”

Last year, Sharpe appeared on Red Ice TV, which is the video offshoot of a white nationalist radio station. On air, he told host Henrik Palmgren that he blamed Jews for promulgating the idea of white supremacy, which he believes is a myth.

“The only thing that makes white supremacy a thought in people’s minds is the media, and the media is controlled by who? The only thing that makes white supremacy a thing is music, and it’s controlled by who? The movies, Hollywood, who controls that? Black people don’t control that. White people don’t control that. Our banking system, when we talk about ‘people got sold out, banks got bailed out,’ well who controls these banks?”

He added, “The minute you say, ‘gay, trans, Jew,’ it’s off limits. So I already know that my country, United States of America, is going to become an Islamic, Jewish, LGBT dominant state. So I’m out of here. I’m going back to Africa.”

After the white supremacist Unite the Right, Sharpe wrote about the rally:

The African American community is in a frenzy. They’re crying about racism, slavery and everything else they can pull out of their toolbox of victimhood.

But what they do not realize is that this is not a demonstration against blacks. This is a dispute between right and left – Liberal versus Conservative. Maybe even White vs Jew.

Blacks are so far removed from reality and misled by fake news, they don’t see this. The demonstration was called “Unite the Right”, not Unite the White. Lol

[…]

The truth is, Alt-right is the victim here. These people chose to exercise their freedom to assemble and they were viciously attacked by ANTIFA goons. This group ANTIFA is probably being funded by the same people that were funding Black Lives Matter.

Why would an outside entity fund ANTIFA and BLM? To keep the race war going. To keep the United States people divided by race instead of class.


More: http://www.rightwingwatch.org/post/righ ... ntroversy/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Wed Apr 25, 2018 3:57 pm



Sisters
Brothers and the whiteys
Blacks and the crackers
Police and their backers
They're all political actors

Hurry
People running from their worries
While the judge and his juries
Dictate the law that's partly flaw

Cat calling
Love balling, fussing and a-cussing
Top billing now is killing
For peace, no one is willing
Kind of make you get that feeling

Everybody smoke
Use the pill and the dope
Educated fools
From uneducated schools
Pimping people is the rule
Polluted water in the pool
And Nixon talking 'bout, "Don't worry"
He say, "Don't worry"
He say, "Don't worry"
He say, "Don't worry"
But they don't know
There can be no show
And if there's hell below
We're all gonna go
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Wed May 16, 2018 1:09 pm

Neo-Nazi Radio Host Suggests Framing Black People For Crimes As A ‘Prank’

Image

On the May 13, 2018 episode of their Third Rail podcast, Spectre and Lauritz von Guildhausen addressed the recent, high-profile incidents in which white people called the police on African-Americans for incredibly petty reasons.


CONTINUE READING
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Wed May 16, 2018 4:07 pm

Eva Díaz
We Are All Aliens

Image


As important as Fuller to artists today is the influence of musician and impresario Sun Ra (1914–93) and his influential space fascination in the 1960s and 1970s, a project that can be summed up as “We are all aliens.” Ra’s landmark afrofuturist works such as the 1972/74 film Space is the Place, and his albums and performances with his band the Arkestra, continue to be immensely popular, often-cited works in contemporary art, his experiments with modal polytonality and polyrhythmic beats looms large in contemporary culture. Space is the Place, scripted in part from lectures Sun Ra gave while teaching a course in 1971 at UC Berkeley titled “The Black Man in the Cosmos,” follows Ra’s attempts to recruit African-Americans to a distant planet he hopes to settle. The plot centers on the menace of white scientists eager to obtain Ra’s interplanetary travel technology. Journeying back in time to a strip club in Chicago where he played piano in the 1940s, Ra meets a black “Overseer,” a Cadillac-driving pimp played by Ray Johnson, who proposes a wager to offer black Americans “earthly delights” against Ra’s hopes for their “altered destiny” in space. Ra eventually wins the bet and he raptures much of the black population of Oakland, California to join his space colony on Saturn.

In promoting a separatist vision of African-American culture as anticapitalist and technologically savvy, Sun Ra turned the function of black music and culture, traditionally exploited as entertainment, into a conduit for black advancement beyond white domination. For Ra, outer space became a utopian outside to segregation and white supremacy, a parallel dimension in which to model a life beyond discriminatory histories of colonization and injustice on Earth.

Image
Sun Ra, ca. 1969. Photo: Thomas Hunter.

Just as access to technology is always fraught with power inequalities (when a Theremin refused to work, Ra joked, “Even machines can be racist. We got to be ready for the space age”), to Ra the many injustices committed against African-Americans by scientists, including unethical scientific studies on black bodies, also extended to dominant culture’s diminishment of black accomplishments in acts of historical whitewashing. Ra led others to question the claims of universality in exploratory space travel and to make links between the history of slavery, the scarce resources available to the oppressed, and hopes for interplanetary travel: “What we never had for so long, space, outer space. Or no space at all. Squeezes so tight. From the slave ship to the shack to the tenement. No space to really move. No space to really function. Sun Ra & Co. herald Space to Come, Freedom, to move, to live again as ourselves. Expansion.”


https://www.e-flux.com/journal/91/19788 ... ll-aliens/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Wed May 23, 2018 10:40 pm

Black Eyed Peas - Street Livin'


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EC8lBwroOc


Prison Industrial Complex. Immigration. Gun Violence. Police Brutality. These issues are critical for our families, friends, communities, and world. Stay Woke, Take Action Now.
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:55 pm

Image

I think most black people in general
Are really not interested in dialogue at this point from white people
I think most black people see "dialogue" or the request of white people for dialogue
As being basically analogous to stalling, okay
Stalling for time, like they say in the hostage dramas



Basslines & Ballistics (feat. Eagleheart Singers)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUkd6oO7L7Q
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: A Short History of “Black Paranoia”

Postby American Dream » Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:40 am

Is The Revolution Your Religion?

Image



We’re All In This Together

Image

Gregory was on disability leave from a Coca-Cola warehouse. He probably figured if he wasn’t going to be working he might as well enjoy himself. He turned on some music, had a few drinks, and relaxed in the small sliver of paradise he’d carved out for his self and his family.

Gregory has a fiancee, Monique Davis. They have three children together.

There is a knock at the door. Innocuous. Gregory doesn’t know it but somebody from the school across the street has called in a noise complaint. Gregory goes to the garage door, where the sound is coming from, and opens it to see who it is.

It’s the police.

Gregory closes the door. He may have wanted to grab his wallet, change his clothes. Maybe turn down the music. The police, after all, were responding to a noise complaint.

He didn’t realize he’d committed a grave error: even alone, inside your own home, it is a fatal condition to be black in America. At this moment, though he never knew it, there was no future for Gregory.

Christopher Newman, a white Florida sheriff’s deputy, shot him three times through that door. This killed him. Every dream, every hope, every project that Gregory put off was lost like rain puddles under the Florida sun. Officer Newman would claim Gregory pointed a gun at him. A gun was indeed found on Newman.

Unloaded. In his back pocket.

Odd thing for a dead man, falling back from being shot, to have the muscle memory to unload his gun and tuck it safely in his back pocket. Even odder the placement–no gun owner carries a pistol in their back pocket. You can’t draw it worth a damn in that position. Why would you sit on your gun anyway?

We know Gregory was executed for no reason. We know the cops maintain a system of white supremacy and brutal exploitation. This isn’t a story about a Black man being lynched by the police. That is as common as swimsuits at Cocoa Beach. This is a story about what came after, when “the people” have to decide if he deserved to die.

Four years ago a grand jury declined to indict Officer Newman, the usual response. Grand juries, often made up of the same “revolutionary” class destined to overthrow capitalism, frequently decline to indict law-enforcement officials who kill their fellow workers.

Gregory’s mother filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Newman and his boss, St. Lucie County Sheriff Ken Mascara. The hope was if “the people” weren’t willing to put a cop in prison for murder, perhaps they were at least willing to provide a small amount of resources for his widow and children. This wouldn’t harm officer Newman or the Sheriff at all: research from Joanna Schwartz of UCLA Law School found that governments, not individual officers, paid 99.98 percent of damages in the case of wrongful death.

The case finally came to a close just recently. The jury deliberated for 10 hours.

The “people” said Gregory was almost entirely at fault because he was drunk. The blame had shifted from “pulling a gun” to simply being black and intoxicated in front of a cop.

It was then time to determine what the city owed Gregory’s family for his lynching.

The jury awarded $1 for funeral expenses to Hill’s mother, and $1 each to Hill’s three children, aged 7, 10 and 13.

The people had been empowered. They came to a consensus. To them a black man’s life wasn’t worth a pine box to bury him in, his children’s pain equitable to a box of chicken Mcnuggets.

The family’s lawyer, John Phillips, was flabbergasted. The jury could have awarded nothing, but instead they chose to further humiliate and denigrate the grieving family. “Either it was punitive,” said Phillips, “or they viewed these children’s pain as virtually worthless.

The jury went home and back to their lives. They joined the nondescript faces we pass in the store or eagerly explain Marx’s ideas to. Gregory’s family was left alone, to struggle and descend into poverty. In the eyes of at least a segment of the Florida population this is exactly what they deserved.


https://godsandradicals.org/2018/06/14/ ... -religion/
User avatar
American Dream
 
Posts: 18950
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Previous

Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests