The Brexit thread

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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:26 am

MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:11 am wrote:
MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 8:59 am wrote:^^Harding. Luke fucking Harding, Christ, he's shameless. When he did crawl back to the Groaniad? Who released him from under his stone?

Luke "Assange met Manafort" Harding, the notorious fucking liar and definite spook.


Why are you copypasting Harding's screeds here? This is at least the second time you've done that, this week alone.


alloneword » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:15 am wrote:
Harding wrote:The committee’s report is based on analysis from Britain’s intelligence agencies, as well as third-party experts such as the former MI6 officer Christopher Steele


:rofl:

Seriously, this is the best Harding can come up with?

It's standard drivel from MI6 sock-puppet - and all round shitweasel - Luke Harding, well known for his lies regarding Assange/wikileaks - being promoted by a poster known for their lies regarding Assange/wikileaks.

I'm still waiting for the 'report' into foreign interference in the Brexit referendum that got us into this clusterfuck in the first place.


Seemslikeadream just continues burying my question and your response in giant copypasta dumps,. In the latest dump, above, she has even spammed her own Brexit thread with a giant off-topic article-plus-photos about Cambridge Analytica.
Last edited by MacCruiskeen on Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:28 am

Last edited by seemslikeadream on Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:30 am

MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:26 am wrote:
MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:11 am wrote:
MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 8:59 am wrote:^^Harding. Luke fucking Harding, Christ, he's shameless. When he did crawl back to the Groaniad? Who released him from under his stone?

Luke "Assange met Manafort" Harding, the notorious fucking liar and definite spook.


Why are you copypasting Harding's screeds here? This is at least the second time you've done that, this week alone.


alloneword » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:15 am wrote:
Harding wrote:The committee’s report is based on analysis from Britain’s intelligence agencies, as well as third-party experts such as the former MI6 officer Christopher Steele


:rofl:

Seriously, this is the best Harding can come up with?

It's standard drivel from MI6 sock-puppet - and all round shitweasel - Luke Harding, well known for his lies regarding Assange/wikileaks - being promoted by a poster known for their lies regarding Assange/wikileaks.

I'm still waiting for the 'report' into foreign interference in the Brexit referendum that got us into this clusterfuck in the first place.


Seemslikeadream just continues burying my question and your response in giant copypasta dumps,. In the latest dump, above, she has even spammed her own Brexit thread with a giant off-topic article-plus-photos about Cambridge Analytica.


And now she's done it yet again.
Last edited by MacCruiskeen on Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:30 am

Inside the World of Cambridge Analytica
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:32 am

WTF?
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:33 am

Brexit: More than 1,000 people call for 'changing Ireland' forum
By Mark Devenport BBC News NI Political Editor
Leo VaradkarGetty Images
The letter to Leo Varadkar was organised by the group Ireland's Future
More than 1,000 Irish citizens have written to Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister) Leo Varadkar calling for a citizens' assembly or forum to discuss constitutional change in Ireland.

They have expressed concern about the "negative repercussions" on Ireland and the peace process from Brexit.

The open letter was organised by the group Ireland's Future.

It argued the "constitutional, political, social and economic status quo on the island" was "in flux".

UK and Ireland ‘could provide NI funding deal’
Brexit deal could spark loyalist disorder, says PSNI
Those who signed the letter said that after Brexit Irish citizens should continue to enjoy the rights they accrue from EU membership.

The group believes it is the Irish government's responsibility to defend those rights, regardless of where its citizens live on the island.

'Mutual, inclusive conversation'

Prominent figures from the arts, business, sport and the professions have signed the letter.

They include the actor Adrian Dunbar, the economist David McWilliams, the footballer James McClean and the boxer Michael Conlan.

The concert promoter Peter Aiken and musicians and writers such as Christy Moore, Sharon Shannon and Martina Devlin have also put their names to it.

A sign on the Irish border that reads: Welcome to Northern IrelandGetty Images
Unionists should have a say about how a "new Ireland" would look, says Niall Murphy
Ireland's Future spokesman Niall Murphy, a lawyer from Belfast, told BBC News NI his group does not consider that a vote on Irish unity "should happen today, tomorrow, this year or... next year".

He said it should not happen "until... all of the economic modelling has occurred and until there has been a mutual inclusive conversation about how a new Ireland would look".

The letter to the taoiseach is the latest in a series from civic nationalists.

The group behind it said it did not want to replicate the "reckless madness" in which the Brexit debate has unfolded in the UK.

Instead it argued it was better to prepare and converse for what it regarded as the "demographic inevitability" of constitutional change in Ireland.

Mr Murphy said a conversation about the potential consequences of an Irish border poll could only happen with what he describes as the "appropriate input from the unionist community".
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-50295291


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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:36 am

What does Cambridge Analytica have to do with Brexit?



seemslikeadream » Sat Jul 27, 2019 8:17 pm wrote:
Carole Cadwalladr

...story here. We still know only a tiny fraction about what CA did worldwide..
Image

In times as dark as these, it’s the small things that give me hope. @podehaye was vital force behind Cambridge Analytica investigation. And he’s still at it. These are screenshots from #TheGreatHack. A day later & an Israeli journalist has already tracked down one of the leads...https://twitter.com/carolecadwalla/stat ... 8245041159


Paul-Olivier Dehaye

Image


i got the date for what s on the top right for me incorrect: it's from nov 2017. so the months are aug, sept, nov 2017.


Replying to @podehaye @annmarlowe @carolecadwalla
Leave EU, Florida, NRA on the same day.

Image

Is that in 2017? Per the photo shots of the diary on screen form @podehaye ?

What was she doing meeting up with Leave EU in August/ September 2017, well over a year AFTER the Brexit referendum was done?

no, the doc jumps around in time, shows 2017 then 2015. the shot you posted is from 2015, as stated

August/Sep 2015 is interesting as Kaiser (in the Great Hack) suggested they did not work with them until Nov 2015. However emails produced by Kaiser to @commonsCMS suggest the end of October.
https://twitter.com/podehaye/status/1154538643614138368


seemslikeadream » Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:29 am wrote:Image

Cambridge Analytica 'privatised colonising operation', not a 'legitimate business', says whistleblower


Chris Wylie makes explosive allegations in session with MPs

By Rebecca Hill 28 Mar 2018 at 05:58
Working for Cambridge Analytica "felt very much like a privatised colonising operation," the former staffer at the centre of the scandal around Facebook data slurps and Vote Leave's alleged overspend has said.

Speaking to MPs today, Chris Wylie, the pink-haired whistleblower with a knack for flamboyant and quotable phrases, made a series of explosive allegations that ranged from the believable to the stuff of conspiracy theorists.

It was less than 10 minutes into a three-hour hearing in front of the UK's House of Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee before the session descended into what can only be described as lurid gossip about the death of Wylie's predecessor, Dan Muresa.

Wylie, who acknowledged he was repeating no more than pure speculation, told MPs that Muresa was poisoned in his hotel room after a deal went sour and that police were bribed not to enter for 24 hours.

The session - which committee chair Damian Collins said was the longest single-panel hearing they’d held - was part of the committee's inquiry into fake news, but has become subsumed by the ongoing controversy surrounding apps' use of Facebook users' data for military-style psy-ops.

The encounter, held just as the committee was knocked back by Zuck, saw star witness Wylie level a series of allegations about his the former company, its parent biz SCL Group and another political advertising biz, AggregateIQ, which he broadly accused of behaving unethically.

He also claimed that a coordinated effort between groups campaigning for the UK to leave the EU (which have been accused of over-spending) had swayed the result of the referendum.

Wylie said his reasons for coming clean was that he didn’t think “military style information operations is conducive for any democratic process, whether a US presidential or a local council race.”

When asked if he wanted to bring the companies he had worked for down, he replied: "Frankly, yes. Nothing good has come from Cambridge Analytica. It's not a legitimate business. SCL is not a legitimate business. So, yes, I don't think they should remain in business."

Summarising his feelings about the companies and execs, Wylie said that they don’t care whether or what they do is legal, as long as it gets the job done.

'There are a lot of reasons I find the company problematic'

His politically charged statements included that the business was “an example of what modern-day colonialism looks like,” alleging that it uses coercion and methods well beyond simple psychological profiling of Facebook users, to influence campaigns around the world.

Wylie said that Nix had a standard pitch that relied on his company’s Mayfair offices and his Eton education, which presents a very posh veneer and plays well in the Commonwealth countries the business targets.

“[It’s] a wealthy company from a developed nation going into an economy or democracy that’s still struggling to get on its feet on the ground and taking advantage of that to profit from it,” he said. “There are a lot of reasons I find the company problematic… It’s not just the data.”

Later in the session, Wylie said that part of SCL’s business model was to “capture a government” in such a way that it had access to ministers.

After that, they could start exploiting relationships and the fact that there’s not a lot of oversight in some African countries to introduce minsters to a company, so they made a deal and get a cut of that deal, Wylie recounted. The key thing, he said, was “you have to have your guy in power first.”

Cambridge Analytica has already denied allegations of wrongdoing in other nations. The firm has been accused of setting up ‘honey traps’ and sub-contracting former spies to help swing elections, after Nix was caught on Channel 4’s cameras bigging up what his firm could offer beyond data crunching to a person posing as a Sri Lankan businessman.

After suspending Nix, the biz issued a statement to say instead that it “undertakes conversations with prospective clients to try to tease out any unethical or illegal intentions”.

AggregateIQ, GSR, Palantir… Any more firms to mention?

The web of organisations and people getting sucked into the scandal is growing rapidly, and MPs used the session to try and tease apart some of the who-knew-what-when, although Cambridge Analytica has tried to argue that Wylie doesn’t have the knowledge he claims.

“Christopher Wylie was a part-time contractor who left in July 2014 and has no direct knowledge of our work or practices since that date,” the biz said during its live-tweeted rebuttals to his evidence.

Nonetheless, Wylie offered up his view of how things had gone down, including that Canadian political ad firm AggregateIQ - who official Brexit campaign Vote Leave spent £3m (about 40 per cent of their campaign budget) on - could be linked to CA’s parent biz SCL.

Wylie claimed that he had introduced Jeff Silvester, co-founder of AIQ, to Nix, and that this resulted in AIQ being set up as what the whistleblower referred to as a Canadian franchise.

AIQ, he said, built the Ripon platform that CA then used for its data analytics work, citing as evidence recent reports that code uploaded to GitHub showed SCL had asked for the code to be transferred to AIQ.

AIQ has issued a statement saying it has “never been and is not a part of Cambridge Analytica or SCL”, has “never entered into a contract with Cambridge Analytica” (although it makes no mention, or denial, of a contract with SCL) and has “never knowingly been involved in any illegal activity.”

Wylie, though, said it is farcical to say AIQ didn’t have access to this data. He insisted that the biz must have had access to the data in question, arguing that this would have been a necessity if it was to develop the targeting software for SCL and CA.

“Cambridge Analytica would have the database, and AIQ would be able to access that, or the software doesn’t work,” he said.

Elsewhere in the session, Wylie claimed that Peter Thiel’s data analytics biz Palantir - whose largest client is the NSA - helped build the models they were working on at Cambridge Analytica.

Wylie said that the firms were introduced because Sophie Schmidt - daughter of Google’s Eric - worked with Nix and introduced him to Palantir; a claim Nix has previously refuted.

Sponsored: Balancing consumerization and corporate control

Page 2 of 2
The academic connection

The MPs also asked Wylie about the relationship between CA and Global Science Research, the firm set up by Cambridge academic Aleksander Kogan, who devised the This is Your Digital Life app that is alleged to have sucked in 50 million Facebook users’ details to develop psychological profiles to target ads against.


Wylie said that the relationship began as a very small pilot to ask if data was matchable to an electoral register, followed by a bigger one to make sure it could actually acquire the data in the speed that he said and then a much larger contract in June 2014.

He described this data as the foundational dataset that CA modeled its algorithms on, and claimed that the biz had signed a $1m contract to get its hands on it - claims CA denied.


Cambridge Analytica

@CamAnalytica
It was far from a $1M project. We paid $500K for the GSR data. Once Facebook told us it breached their terms, we deleted the data and we pursued GSR for damages.

17
5:34 AM - Mar 27, 2018
Twitter Ads info and privacy

35 people are talking about this


Cambridge Analytica

@CamAnalytica
It was far from a $1M project. We paid $500K for the GSR data. Once Facebook told us it breached their terms, we deleted the data and we pursued GSR for damages.

17
5:34 AM - Mar 27, 2018
Twitter Ads info and privacy

35 people are talking about this

The biz said that once Facebook had said that it had breached their terms it had deleted the data and was able to move on without the GSR data by commissioning new surveys and investing in commercial datasets. “Our algorithms and models bear no trace of it,” CA said.

Influencing Brexit

Wylie was also quizzed about the EU referendum, saying that he was absolutely convinced that there was a common plan between Vote Leave and the grassroots BeLeave and the Veterans for Britain groups, which Vote Leave allegedly funnelled money to AIQ through, along with the Democratic Union Party - which also used AIQ in the campaign.

“All of these companies somehow, for some reason, all decided to use AIQ,” he said, adding: "Why is it that all of a sudden, this company that has never worked on anything but Cambridge Analytica projects... somehow became the primary service provider to all of these supposedly independent campaign groups?"

Arguing that the concerted action was in breach of election law and was effectively cheating, he concluded: “It is completely reasonable to say that there could have been a different outcome in the referendum had there not been, in my view, cheating.”

He likened this to doping in the Olympics, saying that there is “not a debate about how much illegal drug you took… if you’re caught cheating you lose your medal”.

'I wasn't so devastated... I went on a vendetta'

Although Wylie was happy to opine on the importance of a true democratic process, he was comfortable when it came to his own involvement in the campaign, as MPs asked him about his approaches to Vote Leave campaign director Dominic Cummings.

Wylie - who said he is in favour of Brexit, but not at the expense of the "integrity of the democratic process" - admits to having approached Cummings to offer his services ahead of the referendum (after he had left CA), but told MPs his proposal was a pilot" and nothing more.

Cummings has issued a number of rebuttals to Wylie's claims in recent days, with one arising as the committee hearing went on, which described Wylie as a charlatan.

The committee said perhaps this was unfair, but asked whether Wylie had tried and failed to follow in Nix's footsteps in setting up a similar firm "hawking your wares" to Vote Leave, but didn't get the deal.

"Yes, but I wasn't so devastated... you have lots of meetings and it doesn’t [always] work out," said Wylie, appearing at his most flustered.

"Sorry, Dom, I wasn't so devastated that I couldn’t work with you that I've spent a year and a half on a vendetta to get back at you for a pilot project that didn't work out."

The MPs also pressed Wylie on when he deleted his copy of the data, which he said he did in 2015, and then confirmed this to Facebook in 2016.

Wylie also said that - although Facebook only changed its policy to stop apps being able to suck up info on users' friends in 2015 - he believed Facebook knew about the situation back in 2014, when he said Kogan “was delayed for a couple of days because Facebook had throttled the app so it couldn’t pull as much data”.

This is in line with Facebook’s developers’ blog, which shows the firm was aware of the privacy issues related to the Graph API loophole, but gave developers a year’s grace period before closing the tap

Wylie also claimed that Facebook didn’t want to make a big deal about the data that Kogan’s app had gathered when it was first made public in 2015 for fear of a PR backlash. He added that the most legal pushback he’d had was not from CA, but from Facebook.

“It’s Facebook that’s most upset about this story,” he said. “They sent some fairly intimidating legal correspondence. They haven’t taken action on that… They have gone silent, they won’t talk to me anymore.”
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/03/2 ... tleblower/


Carole Cadwalladr Retweeted

TED Talks

Verified account

@TEDTalks

"We are what happens to a western democracy when a hundred years of electoral laws are disrupted by technology. Our democracy is broken, our laws don't work anymore." @carolecadwalla


In an unmissable talk, journalist Carole Cadwalladr digs into one of the most perplexing events in recent times: the UK's super-close 2016 vote to leave the European Union. Tracking the result to a barrage of misleading Facebook ads targeted at vulnerable Brexit swing voters -- and linking the same players and tactics to the 2016 US presidential election -- Cadwalladr calls out the "gods of Silicon Valley" for being on the wrong side of history and asks: Are free and fair elections a thing of the past?
https://www.ted.com/talks/carole_cadwal ... _democracy



Wendy Siegelman

There may be news soon on the opaque Cambridge Analytica company - Emerdata Ltd

Total exemption full accounts made up to 31 Aug 2018 filing to be posted in a few days

We'll see if it sheds light on what Mercers & other shareholders/directors are up to
https://twitter.com/wendysiegelman?lang=en



Jennifer Cohn

Per ⁦@chrisinsilico⁩, “Peter Thiel’s data analytics biz Palantir...helped build the models they were working on at Cambridge Analytica.”

(Palantir’s analytics are used by ICE. Cambridge Analytica came up w/ Trump’s “Build that wall” slogan.) 1/

2/ “It was in those early days of 2014, Wylie says, that he and Bannon began testing slogans like “drain the swamp” & “the deep state” & “build the wall,” & found a surprising number of Americans who responded strongly to them. All they needed was a candidate to parrot them.”

Image

3/ The quote in post 2 came from this @suehalpernVT piece in the New Yorker:

4/ So it seems that Trump was Cambridge Analytica’s and Bannon’s “parrot.”

5/ Meanwhile, “Palantir Said It Had Nothing to Do With ICE Deportations. New Documents Seem to Tell a Different Story.”

6/

Building the wall is not to stop immigrants, it's to embody separation. If you can embody "us vs them", you have won that culture war. It's just a concept, it doesn't have to be built. - @chrisinsilico at the @frontlineclub


7/ Thread.

... they tested lots of images of walls, people scaling walls. Considered German experience with the Berlin Wall and what worked psychologically and in culture change... “building the wall is not to stop immigrants - most come on a plane - it’s to embody separation”...


8/ Thread.

... initially they’d just felt they had unlimited money to research what they liked... but then they started to see what the research was being used for... and who it was helping. He’d be in a room hearing how evangelical Christians could use CA to oppress gay rights...

Jennifer Cohn

... so the mission was to get America feeling more separated. You just had to build the wall in peoples heads, you don’t need to actually build it. It becomes enduring to create psychological difference...
Bannon very good at using exclusion and identity politics like this...

...CA is more of a concept rather than a company, it’s really the london office of SCL elections. Most staff are paid by SCL. CA is just branding so it wasn’t seen that a military contractor was getting involved in elections...

Trump is Steve Bannon’s parrot. Bannon tested all of Trump’s hateful rally cries in 2014 and just needed a candidate to parrot them. See thread. https://johannadwinells.wordpress.com/2 ... animals-i/ … 11/

“Parscale Digital, a San Antonio-based digital marketing firm best known for its namesake and former owner Brad Parscale, President Donald Trump’s 2020 campaign chairman, is now being run by a former executive at Cambridge Analytica.”

Always thought Trump was Bannon’s puppet. Sarah Palin first. Watch PBS Congressional testimony of Chris Wylie? Eye opening. The wall & deep state practiced on segments of pop w/racial bias & paranoia. When I hear deep state & trump supporters,just shake my head. Gross way to win
Here We Go Again...

Which brings me back to the question I keep asking:

Where did ALL that state level voter data end up after Trump/Kobach voter fraud scam was over?

Who is accessing it as we speak?

What are they using it for?

Who has had their paws on it since 2017?

Foreign and/or domestic?
https://twitter.com/jennycohn1/status/1 ... 0812648449
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby Belligerent Savant » Tue Nov 05, 2019 11:48 am

^^^^^^^^^^^^


Let it be known that when you claim, "NO ONE here is obligated to discuss ANYTHING with you", you are being dishonest: as demonstrated over the last 2 pages, you ARE actually "replying" directly to Mac, but NOT with your own typed words, or with a response addressing Mac's comment. Instead, you opt to reply (almost always within minutes) with YET MORE COPY/PASTED Material. Again, and again. NOT as a means to address Mac's counterpoint, but as a means to DROWN out his reply with more flooding/copy-pasted content. This is your standard operating procedure, for years.

THIS IS BAD ACTOR/DISHONEST BEHAVIOR.
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 12:20 pm

If Russia meddled in the Brexit vote we need to know – before the election
Gaby Hinsliff
Tue 5 Nov 2019 11.05 EST
Did Russia meddle in the outcome of the Brexit referendum, or didn’t it? It’s hard to think of a question more pertinent to this general election, and not just because some fear there may be dirty tricks this time too. Boris Johnson’s entire campaign strategy hinges on arguing that Brexit must be done, because it’s the will of the people.

The prime minister cannot admit any whisper of doubt about the legitimacy of the referendum, partly because leave voters would eat him alive for it, and partly because Brexit is his only really big idea. Without it, what is the great Conservative mission to change the country? All that would be left is a row about who should put right the damage his party did over nine years, and a promise not to be Jeremy Corbyn for those who find the idea of a Corbyn government terrifying. Without Brexit, the abyss beckons. And that’s the context in which Downing Street is declining to publish until after the election a parliamentary report expected to shed light on how we ended up with Brexit in the first place.

Since nobody can read the findings, it’s hard to know whether the intelligence and security committee’s conclusion is actually worrying or not, although the Tory-turned-independent MP Dominic Grieve has taken the unusual step as its chair of insisting voters need to see it. (The first rule of ISC, the only parliamentary committee cleared to operate within the intelligence services’ ring of confidence, is not to talk about ISC.)

As with other shady tactics, from Vote Leave’s illegal overspending to the lies that the outgoing EU president Jean-Claude Juncker this week accused Johnson and others of telling, it’s impossible to know if they actually changed the result: remainers are prone to underestimating how strongly many leavers felt, and my own suspicion is that claiming the vote was fixed may be easier than facing up to the real anger in some communities or the political failures that led here. But that’s the whole point of the ISC examining it.

Sitting on its findings until after the election has dangerous consequences for public trust in democracy. This is the first election I can remember where it’s possible to imagine people simply not accepting the result, especially if it’s close. No matter how disappointed we are in the outcome of an election, British voters generally grumble and get on with it. The unwritten rule is that losers accept they’ve lost, so long as winners promise to govern in everyone’s interest. But the smooth transition of power on which democracy depends is conditional on voters trusting that the process was fair. It is reckless beyond belief for governments to risk undermining that trust.

Election law badly needs overhauling. The Electoral Commission is struggling to follow the money, sometimes only identifying breaches of campaign funding rules long after the event. Tech companies are now worried enough about spreading misleading campaign material that Twitter has banned political advertising and Facebook is requiring greater transparency about who is behind it, although the latter still won’t fact-check ads.

Back in February, the Commons select committee on culture, media and sport released a landmark report on disinformation and fake news, arguing that electoral law “is no longer fit for purpose and needs to be changed”. Its chair, Damian Collins, is no conspiracy theorist but a Conservative alarmed by the evidence. We badly need an overhaul of the law to protect the integrity of our democratic process but instead what we’re getting is another snap election with no time for all that, a report withheld and an assumption that voters will just take all this in good faith. The prime minister should stop banking on a trust he has done nothing to earn.

• Gaby Hinsliff is a Guardian columnist
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... tee-report
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby RocketMan » Tue Nov 05, 2019 1:32 pm

SLaD, I used to think you're just self-serving, slightly obsessed and unable to handle criticism. Now I as well believe you are A BAD ACTOR.

Why do you cite Luke Harding, a known liar and promoter of malicious state propaganda?


Why are you unable to calmly answer a direct question?

MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 5:30 pm wrote:
MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:26 am wrote:
MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:11 am wrote:
MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 8:59 am wrote:^^Harding. Luke fucking Harding, Christ, he's shameless. When he did crawl back to the Groaniad? Who released him from under his stone?

Luke "Assange met Manafort" Harding, the notorious fucking liar and definite spook.


Why are you copypasting Harding's screeds here? This is at least the second time you've done that, this week alone.


alloneword » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:15 am wrote:
Harding wrote:The committee’s report is based on analysis from Britain’s intelligence agencies, as well as third-party experts such as the former MI6 officer Christopher Steele


:rofl:

Seriously, this is the best Harding can come up with?

It's standard drivel from MI6 sock-puppet - and all round shitweasel - Luke Harding, well known for his lies regarding Assange/wikileaks - being promoted by a poster known for their lies regarding Assange/wikileaks.

I'm still waiting for the 'report' into foreign interference in the Brexit referendum that got us into this clusterfuck in the first place.


Seemslikeadream just continues burying my question and your response in giant copypasta dumps,. In the latest dump, above, she has even spammed her own Brexit thread with a giant off-topic article-plus-photos about Cambridge Analytica.


And now she's done it yet again.
-I don't like hoodlums.
-That's just a word, Marlowe. We have that kind of world. Two wars gave it to us and we are going to keep it.
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 1:48 pm

The Guardian is not on the list of banned links at RI I just checked the rules again

I will keep keep linking to The Guardian since as of 11-5-19 The Guardian is not on the banned list

I am fully aware there are members here that disagree with what I post/how I post and I accept that and I will follow all RI rules


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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby MacCruiskeen » Tue Nov 05, 2019 2:04 pm

seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 12:48 pm wrote:The Guardian is not on the list of banned links at RI I just checked the rules again

I will keep keep linking to The Guardian

I am fully aware there are members here that disagree with what I post and I accept that


Unbelievable. Your dishonesty and evasiveness are off the chart.

You know perfectly well that this is not about "linking to the Guardian".

You know perfectly well that this has zero to do with any "list of banned links".

You know perfectly well that this has nothing to with "the rules".

Why are you doing this to RI? Why won't you answer a straight question? Why are you repeatedly copypasting the writings of Luke Harding, a now-notorious liar, disinformationist and spook?

This is a Discussion Board.
There sawe I fyrst the derke ymagynyng
Of felony [...]
The pyckpurse and eke the pale drede,
The smyler, with the knyfe under the cloke.
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby seemslikeadream » Tue Nov 05, 2019 2:10 pm

I will continue to post anyone that is allowed to be linked here I can not help that it troubles you so much feel free to keep complaining, it's who you are. I am resigned to it. Have a lovely day

and it was fantastic to see all three of you together in a matter of minutes, kinda like a warm and cozy family reunion

I can not help that you do not understand Cambridge Analytica connection to Brexit

RI members linking to The Guardian since 2006


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Litvinenko's widow Marina said General Nalobin was her husband's boss in the 1990s when Litvinenko was an FSB agent.

Sergey Nalobin
Suspected Russian spy pictured with his 'good friend' Boris Johnson
https://www.businessinsider.com/suspect ... son-2018-2



Thread by @karolcummins: "Sergey Nalobin & Boris Johnson Suspected Russian spy Sergey Nalobin pictured with his 'good friend' Boris Johnson So who is Nalobin? He […]" #Sanctions #SergeyNalobin #BorisJohnson #VoteLeave
Jun 22nd 2019, 23 tweets, 9 min read Read on Twitter
Sergey Nalobin & Boris Johnson
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Suspected Russian spy Sergey Nalobin pictured with his 'good friend' Boris Johnson
So who is Nalobin?

He is a key figure in the reported Russian programme to deepen the "co-operation" between senior Conservative politicians and the Russian government under the umbrella of the CONSERVATIVE FRIENDS OF RUSSIA group.
The Conservative Friends of Russia group's diplomatic contact inside the Russian embassy, Sergey Nalobin, has family ties to Russia's intelligence agencies.
His father, Nikolai Nalobin, is a former KGB general. Nalobin Sr worked in a top role with the FSB, the successor to the KGB, which the government believes was involved in the murder of Alexander Litvinenko.
Litvinenko's widow Marina said General Nalobin was her husband's boss in the 1990s when Litvinenko was an FSB agent.
"Sergey Nalobin's brother also worked for the FSB, according to the Russian press.

Vladimir Putin, a former KGB spy, was head of the FSB before becoming Russian president in 2000.
"Sources suggest it was Sergey Nalobin who invited Richard Royal, the chairman of Conservative Friends of Russia, and other members, to visit Moscow and St Petersburg in September on a 10-day trip paid for by the Russian government.
The diplomat also set up meetings there with politicians from Putin's United Russia and other Kremlin-approved parties.
Nalobin also arranged the launch event in the ambassador's Kensington garden and is pictured under the organisation's banner."
Sergey Nalobin was accused of running a “front group” to promote the Kremlin's interests in the Conservative Party two years ago, he had been in Britain for five years and three months before sent packing back to Russia
The Kremlin instructed its diplomats in London to deepen their "co-operation" w/ the Conservative party in an apparent attempt to mute criticism of RU abysmal human rights record & to rebuild ties following the murder of Alexander Litvinenko.#Sanctions
Circa 2012: Russian diplomats were "instructed by Moscow" to explore how the Conservatives and United Russia could co-operate in the Council of Europe.
The two parties belong to the same faction in the council's parliamentary assembly, with Tory members frequently voting with their Russian colleagues against motions condemning Moscow.
In an April 2011 email, Nalobin wrote to Cristo: "We've received instructions from Moscow – to discuss the perspective of co-operation between British Conservatives and United Russia in the parliamentary assembly of the Council of Europe.
Nalobin also inquired if there were young Tories who might be interested in travelling to Moscow to attend a Kremlin-sponsored youth forum.
He was subsequently in contact with Royal, the group's chairman, and with other activists who went on to form Conservative Friends of Russia.
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RU has multiple reasons for seeking to influence the Conservatives.

The increasingly Eurosceptic (Anti-EU) Tory party has shunned its traditional center-right allies in Europe in favor of a pact with Putin's party

RU: exploit the extreme R & L
The two are pillars of the European Democrat Group (EDG), which can only function if they cooperate. Russia has forged ad hoc alliances with the Tories and others to see off motions it regards as hostile – over its 2008 war with Georgia, for example.
Magnitsky Act

Moscow's priority is to prevent the UK and other EU countries from introducing the Magnitsky Act, named after the Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, who was beaten to death in prison in Russia in 2009.
Russian interference in elections in the EU & US always circles back to the Kremlin’s goal of preventing the adoption of the Magnitsky Act or repealing it if already adopted.

Russia’s Crime of the Century
How crooked officials pulled off a massive scam, spent millions on Dubai real estate, and killed Magnitsky when he tried to expose them.
If there remains any pretense that justice and rule of law exist in Moscow today, that notion should now be counted as pure fantasy. The case of Sergei Magnitsky

Russia = Transnational Organized Crime Hub = Mafia state.
https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1142 ... 17248.html


Dan Sabbagh

Deep into the Russia report debate and so far only one MP - Steve Baker - has spoken up to defend No10's decision to sit on the controversial document. Tory after Tory urges publication...but no sign of Downing Street yielding

Christopher Pincher, junior minister, repeatedly accuses Labour MPs indulging in conspiracy theories about the suppressed ISC Russia report. But has the lecturing minister actually seen it himself?

Dominic Grieve says ISC Russia report could be delayed by *six months* if No10 doesn't do a U-turn and allow it to be published today because ctte has to be reformed after an election....

As the Commons gears up to hear an urgent question from Dominic Grieve on the suppression of a parliamentary report on Russian infiltration - read the already public conclusions of the Commons DCMS committee on Russia and British elections. "The UK is clearly vulnerable".
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https://twitter.com/dansabbagh
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby Elvis » Tue Nov 05, 2019 6:09 pm

Straw Man Fallacy : Thou shall not misrepresent or exaggerate a person's argument in order to make it easier to attack.


Hasty Generalization : Thou shall not use small numbers to represent the whole.
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
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Re: The Brexit thread

Postby Elvis » Tue Nov 05, 2019 7:35 pm

Backfire effect
The reaction to disconfirming evidence by strengthening one's previous beliefs. cf. Continued influence effect.


Continued influence effect
The tendency to believe previously learned misinformation even after it has been corrected. Misinformation can still influence inferences one generates after a correction has occurred. cf. Backfire effect


Confirmation bias
The tendency to search for, interpret, focus on and remember information in a way that confirms one's preconceptions.



None of us are immune to cognitive biases, but we can all try to avoid them! :basicsmile
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
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