1999: Human bones used in Masonic ritual

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1999: Human bones used in Masonic ritual

Postby biaothanatoi » Thu Aug 24, 2006 3:00 am

The West Australian (Perth) July 23, 1999<br>by Anne Buggins<br><br>MASONIC BONE RITUAL SHOCKS ABORIGINES:<br>Freemasons give police human skulls for forensic testing<br><br>Aboriginal activist Clarrie Isaacs, who is a former member of the WA Freemasons, says he is surprised and disappointed to discover <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Aboriginal bones had been used in masonic secret rituals</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->.<br><br>A skull and crossbones belonging to the Newman Masonic Lodge was identified as Aboriginal, prompting Freemasons to surrender up to 60 such skulls to police for forensic testing.<br><br>"I wouldn't like to see the use of human bones in any ritual," he said. "I don't think it is a Christian sort of thing to have bones hanging around."<br><br>Mr. Isaacs, who is a Muslim, said he was a member of the Concorde Lodge in Stirling Highway for about three years, but left in 1988. "I somehow felt it didn't really fit my style," he said. "<!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>It was a lot of big businessmen and tons of police</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->."<br><br>"Some of them were doing good things -- not all of them were police. I was just working for the Water Authority, I couldn't keep up with all their donations. I don't think they objected to me, maybe it was a novelty to say they had the only Aboriginal in the lodge." <br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Despite entering the third masonic degree and attaining the title of Master Mason, Mr. Isaacs had never seen a set of bones used for any ceremonial ritual.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> He said he may not have been eligible to see them. "As you join among men and want to be their equal, you would hope they don't have such<br>dastardly things going on," he said.<br><br>Mr. Isaacs said he became fed up with the amount of time masons spent memorising things and reading them out. "I thought, 'How am I ever going to apply this stuff'. It was a bit like nonsense," he said.<br><br>Yesterday, Coroner's Court manager Glenn Spivey said police had handed in a few skulls for testing in recent weeks. Forensic tests normally took up to 10 days, but there could be a delay if lots came at once. <br><br>Other Aboriginal spokesmen have reacted strongly to the news. The Perth Noongar Regional Council chairman, the Rev. Cedric Jacobs, said he was devastated to think the bones of any human had been used in such a manner and believed the Masons should be prosecuted. He said the matter would be<br>raised at a council meeting next month.<br><br>But Manguri Aboriginal Corporation director Dean Collard said he saw practical difficulties with any move to prosecute. "I don't think it can be done," he said. "Just in a practical sense who do you prosecute?" He applauded the Masons' decision to hand other skulls in for forensic examination. He said it showed respect for Aboriginal beliefs.<br><br><br>FREEMASONS HAND OVER 60 SKULLS FOR POLICE TESTS<br>The West Australian (Perthy) July 22, 1999 page 1<br>by Anne Buggins<br><br>WA Freemasons could be forced to reveal details of their secret ceremonies after a skull and crossbones belonging to the Newman Lodge were identified as Aboriginal. The discovery has prompted Freemasons to surrender up to 60<br>such skulls for forensic testing and to begin using photographic<br>transparencies instead of human remains in rituals.<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Aboriginal elder Ken Colbung, who likened Freemason rituals to those of a witches' coven, wants the masons to be prosecuted.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> "It makes your blood run cold really," he said yesterday. "I am not against them using skeletal<br>remains as long as they have got permission, but <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>when they become grave robbers we would tend to think they shouldn't be doing that."</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>But South Hedland Det Sgt. Ron Clarke said prosecution was not an issue. The masons had not contravened a section of the Criminal Code which dealt with "misconduct with regard to a corpse."</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>Irene Stainton, assistant director of Aboriginal heritage and culture at the Aboriginal Affairs Department, said it was "hugely significant" to all Aboriginal people that human remains be returned to a person's country or place of origin. But pathologists could confirm only the remains were those of an Aboriginal man, aged 30 to 35.<br><br>The masonic ritual came to light in February when three boys, aged six and seven, took a box containing the bones from an unlocked storeroom of the Newman Masonic Lodge. After ruling out any suspicious circumstances, South Hedland detectives sent the bones to Perth for forensic testing. They were found to be Aboriginal, placed in the custody of the Aboriginal affairs Department, and are now stored temporarily at the WA Museum.<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Peter Bloor, grand secretary of the Grand Lodge of WA Freemasons, yesterday insisted the bones, covered with a cement-like substance and some yellow paint and kept in a box equipped with an electric light, were nothing more<br>than a simple teaching aid.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>"We use them as teaching aids in much the same way as a university uses a human skull," he said. "The show the inevitability of death and the fragility of life." <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>He said about 60 of the 180 masonic lodges across the state had a similar set of remains.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> <br><br>Some were made of ceramic or plaster, but most were human and came from the Indian sub-continent, as did those used in universities. He said records did not show where the bones were from, but it was possible they had been transferred from a lodge in Cue to one in Newman earlier this century. The remains were viewed by candidates for the third and highest masonic "level of understanding" known as the third degree.<br><br>Mr. Bloor acknowledged that the switch to using transparencies in rituals could be seen as forcing the masons into the 20th century. He said the bones were not touched or interfered with in any way. In a lodge such as Newman, this type of ceremoney would occur about once a year. He said the masons had not known the remains were Aboriginal. The decision to surrender all skulls was made to ensure any other Aboriginal remains could be dealt with properly.<br><br>Ms. Stainton said the Freemason's decision to surrender other remains was a responsible attitude which showed they respected Aboriginal culture. She said if the remains predated the 1972 Aboriginal Heritage Act a prosecution would not be possible. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: 1999: Human bones used in Masonic ritual

Postby bvonahsen » Thu Aug 24, 2006 5:36 am

So here is the question:<br><br>How many of those "innocent" Masonic Lodges in just about every city and town in America have real human remains that they use in their rituals? <p></p><i></i>
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Re: 1999: Human bones used in Masonic ritual

Postby Gouda » Thu Aug 24, 2006 6:03 am

Remember the story alleging that Prescott and boys stole Geronimo's skull and smuggled it into their inner lair at Yale for generations of skull'n'bones initiatory ritual? <br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.yaleherald.com/article.php?Article=2523">www.yaleherald.com/articl...ticle=2523</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.petitiononline.com/Geronimo/petition.html">www.petitiononline.com/Ge...ition.html</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>And a skeptical take: <!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://www.straightdope.com/columns/051111.html">www.straightdope.com/columns/051111.html</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The outraged Apache traveled to New York to meet with S&B representatives and demand that Geronimo's S&B be returned. In one account of the meetings the S&B people admit, "We have a skull that we call Geronimo." Alexandra Robbins, in Secrets of the Tomb: Skull and Bones, the Ivy League, and the Hidden Paths of Power (2002), says S&B offered to give the Apache the abovementioned display case and a skull. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>But they also said they'd had the skull examined and found it wasn't Geronimo's but rather that of a ten-year-old boy. </strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->Suspicious, the Apache refused the offer, and there's been no progress to speak of since. The story still surfaces occasionally, playing into rants about the perfidy of the Bush family, S&B as an arm of the Illuminati, callous treatment of Native Americans, and so on.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> Oh, ten year old boy, that's ok then. <br> <p></p><i></i>
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very educational

Postby blanc » Thu Aug 24, 2006 10:27 am

teaching aid!!! <p></p><i></i>
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Re: very educational

Postby rocco33 » Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:07 pm

Isn't is said that Skull and Bones also has Pancho Villa's skull? It is missing after all. If not at Yale, I would imagine it isn't too far away from these lizards. <br><br>By the way, what was the outcome of this? I'd been hearing more and more Aussies complain about the government using Aboriginal's plights to inact all kinds of ridiculous hate crime laws. No doubt, the ADL and the Masons aren't too far behind on that global "hate crime" goal. <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=rocco33>rocco33</A> at: 8/24/06 10:10 am<br></i>
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Re: 1999: Human bones used in Masonic ritual

Postby AlanStrangis » Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:22 pm

Just juxtaposing a couple of quotes from the articles...<br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Mr. Isaacs, who is a Muslim, said he was a member of the Concorde Lodge in Stirling Highway for about three years, but left in 1988. "I somehow felt it didn't really fit my style," he said. "It was a lot of big businessmen and tons of police."<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br>and...<br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>But South Hedland Det Sgt. Ron Clarke said prosecution was not an issue. The masons had not contravened a section of the Criminal Code which dealt with "misconduct with regard to a corpse."<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>We dun do no bad, mate!<br><br><!--EZCODE EMOTICON START ;) --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/wink.gif ALT=";)"><!--EZCODE EMOTICON END--> <br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Postby FourthBase » Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:38 am

Bump.
“Joy is a current of energy in your body, like chlorophyll or sunlight,
that fills you up and makes you naturally want to do your best.” - Bill Russell
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Postby lunarose » Sat Mar 08, 2008 7:23 pm

all u.s. citizens should feel proud of the huge number of aboriginal remains in the collections of universities, colleges, museums, and of course the smithsonian. the last institution was famous for paying a 'reward' on receipt of any set of aboriginal remains, the fresher the better - no questions asked.

wait! oops! - none of those are 'secret societies', my bad.
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Postby FourthBase » Sat Mar 08, 2008 8:18 pm

That's right, those universities and museums use the bones in rituals.

Oh wait, no they don't.
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Postby Joe Hillshoist » Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:34 am

Its almost as bad tho, cos they don't allow those remains to be used in the rituals they should be used in.

IE whatever those aboriginal cultures did in the way of funerals and honouring their dead.
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Postby lunarose » Sun Mar 09, 2008 11:13 am

here in the states, it is even worse, because the universities, museums, etc. know and are sure of the provenance of the remains and that is the reason they refuse to relinquish them - in the australian case, this knowledge prompted the relinquishing of the remains so they would find their proper rest.

'A skull and crossbones belonging to the Newman Masonic Lodge was identified as Aboriginal, prompting Freemasons to surrender up to 60 such skulls to police for forensic testing.

"I wouldn't like to see the use of human bones in any ritual," he said. "I don't think it is a Christian sort of thing to have bones hanging around."'

don't lose hope, though, i'm sure there are/were masons involved in the university/med school/museum cabal.
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Postby Joe Hillshoist » Mon Mar 10, 2008 1:08 am

Australian aboriginals are still fighting universities worldwide for the return of their ancestors' remains.
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Postby chiggerbit » Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:29 pm

I wonder if that's why Chief Blackhawk's head was stolen:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iavanbur/Facts ... ckHawk.htm

".....When he died, he was buried on the James Jordan farm in the northwest corner of Van Buren County at his request. In a sitting position, he was adorned with a battle uniform and all his medals (worth several thousand dollars.) Although his grave was guarded, Dr. James Turner of Lexington robbed the gravesite of Black Hawk’s head on July 3, 1839, which he claimed was for research purposes.

Sarah Welch witnessed Dr. Turner’s return early that morning with the head and says that the flesh was boiled off the skull that same afternoon. Dr. Turner and his family fled to the St. Louis area but kept in contact with the Welch family. Later in 1840, it is thought that Dr. Turner returned and stole the rest of the body. The skeletal remains under the care of Iowa’s governor were later found and placed in a museum, but the building unfortunately burned.

According to Sarah Welch, this assumption is not true. She says that members of the chief’s family in Iowaville probably reported that the rest of Black Hawk’s skeleton had been stolen in order to keep additional looters away from his gravesite. According to her, the skeleton that was later attached to Black Hawk’s skull could not have been that of the old chief, but was the skeleton of a shorter man. Black Hawk had stood five feet eleven inches tall, a man of considerable height in his day! Consequently his skeletal remains, (minus the head) might still be found in the Iowaville Cemetery at the gravesite that marks his burial place."


More here:
http://iagenweb.org/history/annals/oct1922.htm
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