MIND GAMES: John Lennon & The Manchurian Candidate

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Re: MIND GAMES: John Lennon & The Manchurian Candidate

Postby MinM » Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:10 pm

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Graham Spanier

On 15 November 2011, Thomas H Naylor, at Counter Punch, links the Penn State child abuse scandal to the 1994 Christian Children's Fund Scandal

In 1994, Spanier was Chairman of the Board of the Christian Children's Fund (CCF).

CCF is the world's largest child sponsorship organization and is located in Richmond, Virginia.

CCF is similar to World Vision, which reportedly is a front for the CIA.

Thomas H Naylor was kicked off the CCF board for being a whistleblower...
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http://www.counterpunch.org/2011/11/15/ ... d-scandal/

viewtopic.php?p=434957#p434957
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Re: MIND GAMES: John Lennon & The Manchurian Candidate

Postby MinM » Fri Aug 19, 2016 12:34 am

@whowhatwhy Aug 16

Both John #Hinckley & Mark David Chapman had involvement w/World Vision, historically closely associated with #CIA.

cptmarginal » Wed Apr 09, 2014 1:49 am wrote:Jacquelline Fuller, Google Executive Resigns From World Vision Board Over Gay Marriage Decision

Man, until this thread prompted me to look it up I had no idea World Vision was even still around.

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Beyond Homophobia: The Even Bigger Reason To Avoid World Vision

Full article with embedded links is worth looking at, here's an excerpt:

Beyond Homophobia: The Even Bigger Reason To Avoid World Vision

Sunday, 06 April 2014 10:10

By Valerie Tarico, Away Point | Op-Ed


In a media frenzy akin to the Komen scandal, Evangelical aid organization World Vision (annual budget one billion plus) announced recently that it would allow legally married and monogamous queer Christians on its payroll. Conservative co-religionists, including Franklin Graham of Billy Graham Ministries, and Russell Moore of the Southern Baptist Convention took to the media denouncing the decision as a violation of biblical Christianity and all that is good. Thousands of Evangelicals withdrew their support from desperately poor children around the world, over $800,000 in all.

To compensate, moderate people of faith solicited donations. But then World Vision caved and reinstated its old employee conduct rules which require a commitment of abstinence for all but married straights. Questions abound: Will Evangelicals who withdrew their support return? Will the new pledges stick? (World Vision U.S. has offered to refund them, and World Vision Canada has issued assurances that it abides by Canada’s anti-discrimination laws.) How will the controversy affect World Vision coffers, grantees, and partner relationships in the long run?

One irreversible effect of the controversy is that World Vision is now out to the general public as a “para-church” entity, bound to biblical literalism and a derivative set of theological orthodoxies. When disaster strikes, World Vision solicitations rarely call attention to the Evangelical beliefs that are baked into its organizational structure. Consequently, some would be donors think they are giving to either a secular organization like Save the Children or one with distant Christian roots like the Red Cross.

The reality is that World Vision is committed to their Evangelical worldview. In 2011, World Vision fought all the way to the Supreme Court of the United States and won the right to fire warehouse workers and support staff who didn’t believe in the trinity or the unique deity of Jesus. In seeking exemption from anti-discrimination laws, attorneys for World Vision argued that the organization couldn’t fulfill its Christian mission if such internal theological differences were allowed.

This argument may seem patently specious. After all, in order to secure hundreds of millions annually in taxpayer funding World Vision has said repeatedly that the organization does not proselytize, and a liberal Christian or even a godforsaking atheist can pack medical supplies into a box as well as an Evangelical can.

But does World Vision really provide aid without a side-serving of evangelism? Their website and contents of a recent World Vision Christmas catalog would suggest otherwise. The catalog included Bibles in a child’s own language as one of the items that donors can purchase for aid recipients, along with soccer balls and musical instruments: “Share the meaning and message of Christmas,” the print exhorted. “It will mean more than you can imagine for a child who is eager to have a Bible in his or her own language. What a wonderful way to show a boy or girl God’s love.” In 2012 alone, World Vision claims to have made available 1,296,038 Bibles and New Testaments.

Keep in mind that the targets of such giving include kids who may own no other books. Soccer balls, school supplies, food and Bibles add up to a pretty persuasive argument for considering Christianity. As their website puts it, “In all ways appropriate for a local context, we seek to witness to Christ — through our deeds of love and mercy, the character and conduct of our staff, and through our words of testimony.”

One place World Vision partners with local churches and works on “child witness” is Uganda, where the influence of American Evangelicals has led to legislation that prescribes a life sentence for homosexual behavior. The bottom line is that no-one should be supporting World Vision who doesn’t hold Evangelical beliefs and desire to win souls for Jesus.


No mention of what could potentially be the even bigger reason to avoid World Vision...

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cptmarginal » Wed Apr 09, 2014 5:49 am wrote:
operator kos » Wed Mar 19, 2014 3:26 pm wrote:I know that interesting links can be found between World Vision and events as diverse as the Phoenix Program, the training of the Contras, the Jonestown massacre, the assassination of John Lennon, and the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan. But is there any single "smoking gun" that proves that they are a front for black ops?


A good question... It seems that most of the commonly repeated details about these activities trace back to the work of John Judge, and his assertions about World Vision are mostly well-sourced and seem pretty accurate but can be hard to verify sometimes.

Some of the more important sources about them include a number of articles published in National Catholic Reporter and a 1979 Christian Century Magazine article entitled "World Vision, Go Home!"

The following quote comes from this PDF, which contains more specific information about World Vision's intelligence role than any other freely available article I've managed to find. There's a lot more in it than just this one paragraph.

When it began to operate in Vietnam in the mid-60's, World Vision decided to put its large headquarters across the street in front of the U .S . Embassy in Saigon . Writing in Christian Century Magazine, Michael Lee, U .S . journalist states that World Vision was openly supportive of U .S, intervention in South East Asia and enjoyed the support of the U .S . Army as evidenced by its use of American military trucks and helicopters during its field programmes . "The CIA", Lee added, "used information obtained by the group's field workers as a part of its normal intelligence function" . (2) In fact, this was not the first time that such a strong accusation was made against World Vision . On 1 August 1975, the National Catholic Reporter (Kansas City), basing itself on a New Asia, News dispatch published in the Far East Economic Review reported that World Vision was getting "million dollar annual subsidies from the US government for highly valued political and military intelligence ."


Here's a book that has some goods on them:

http://books.google.com/books?id=VRDo9R ... 22&f=false

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Also: Alex Constantine's Anti-Fascist Research Bin: World Vision

http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Wo ... ernational
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