Masculinities of the far right

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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Tue Sep 11, 2018 1:54 pm

Despicable': blogger must do 200 hours community service for defacing memorial to slain comedian

Andrew Nolch must pay more than $19,500 in restitution for the damage to a memorial to Melbourne woman Eurydice Dixon

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The blogger who defaced the Melbourne memorial to slain comedian Eurydice Dixon must do 200 hours of community service for his crime, but has not been sentenced to jail.

Andrew Nolch, 29, pleaded guilty last Thursday to criminal damage for painting a 25-metre long penis at the Princes Park memorial in June.

Nolch committed the act just days after Dixon was raped and murdered, and the night before a public vigil was held. He said he was making “a statement for men’s rights”.


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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Thu Sep 13, 2018 8:29 pm

http://blog.iblamethepatriarchy.com/pat ... y-way/mra/

MRAs


Q: What’s an “MRA”?

A: Massively [W]rong Asshole. Or ‘men’s rights activist’.

Q: Why don’t the Odd Lady want none of them in her car?

A: MRAs are patriarchy-deniers. The ideologies of this violent and knobbish subset of the Male Dominion spring from male fear of women’s personal sovereignty, and manifest in practice as active misogyny. Men suffer, O how they suffer, at the hands of subhuman conniving bitches who seek world domination through insane women-are-human propaganda and the misguided attempt to claim their own internal organs as private property. The MRA imagines that women’s interests control and abuse him in an ever more feminized world; he erroneously sees himself as a battered victim of women’s agency, rather than what he actually is: a moron.

The goals of the men’s rights “movement” include, but are not limited to:

• supporting legislation that would give men an edge in child custody battles.
• the right to hijack another human being’s personal uterus if the MRA suspects his sacred genetic material is involved in an embryo contained therein.
• promulgating baseless claims that men are in constant danger of physical assault by legions of villainous females, and that there exists some kind of vast matriarchal conspiracy to cover this up.
• the practice of beating up women, kidnapping her kids, going on the lam, convincing family court judges that the woman is crazy, and summarily escaping jail time.


Anyone who cries “what about the men?” in a radical feminist forum is, whether he likes it or not, an MRA sympathizer.

If you’re ever bored of a rainy afternoon, and feel that an inundation of hate mail and death threats would be just the thing to break up the ennui, try dropping this factbomb at an MRA forum:

“Abusive fathers are far more likely than nonabusive parents to fight for child custody, not pay child support, and kidnap children.”[cite]
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Fri Sep 14, 2018 5:19 pm

Russian and American Christian fundamentalists join forces to further their shared agenda

Welcome to Moldova!

CASEY MICHEL
SEP 14, 2018


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MOLDOVA, HEADED BY PRESIDENT IGOR DODON (LEFT), WILL BE HOSTING A SERIES OF RUSSIAN AND AMERICAN CHRISTIAN FUNDAMENTALISTS THIS WEEK.

The conference is organized by the World Congress of Families (WCF), the most prominent Russian-American Religious Right group extant, and widely considered one of the foremost anti-LGBTQ organizations in the world. Among those slated to speak in Chisinau are the Vatican secretary of state, the deputy chair of the Russian Duma, and the wife of a prominent, and sanctioned, Russian oligarch — as well as Moldovan President Igor Dodon himself.

“Being the leader of the country, in which for many centuries Christianity played a key part, I tend to support all initiatives related to the the unification of society and its return to true values, written in the Bible,” Dodon, who did not respond to ThinkProgress’ interview requests, said in a statement.

The origin of WCF dates back to 1995, when an American named Allan Carlson flew to Moscow, meeting a handful of Russian sociologists and, as Mother Jones described, an “Orthodox mystic.” As Carlson told ThinkProgress earlier this year, he never expected anyone in Russia to reach out to him, or to discuss his research on the so-called “natural family.” But the trip planted the seed for the creation of WCF and, in the two decades since, it has become the primary unifying force between anti-LGBTQ advocates and proponents for rolling back abortion rights worldwide.

It has also evolved into the primary bridge between members of the American Religious Right and higher-ups in Russia — including those close to Kremlin leadership — seeking to unwind social progress in the U.S. and across the world.

Indeed, WCF has grown so prominent that it’s attracted Russian oligarchs who have played key roles in Russia’s neo-imperial, anti-democratic aims. Vladimir Yakunin, one of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s oldest confidants, is currently sanctioned by the U.S. — but that hasn’t stopped him from allegedly becoming one of WCF’s primary sponsors. Another sanctioned Russian oligarch allegedly sponsoring WCF activities is Konstantin Malofeev, a man dubbed “God’s oligarch” and with conspicuous links to Russian-backed forces in eastern Ukraine. For good measure, WCF’s official Russian representative, Alexey Komov, happens to work as the director of Malofeev’s far-right St. Basil the Great Foundation.

For years, WCF has looked to Putin’s leadership as a model to bear in the U.S. — especially as it pertains to advancing socially conservative pieces of legislation across the country. As WCF’s Larry Jacobs once said, “The Russians might be the Christian saviors of the world.” Jacobs later added that he “think[s] Russia is the hope for the world right now.”

While WCF’s 2014 plans to host its annual conference in Moscow fell through — thanks, namely, to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine — the group has continued its international expansion, and continued hosting large-scale gatherings of Christian fundamentalists at conferences in Georgia and Hungary.

This year, WCF opted to host its annual conference in Moldova, a country, like Georgia and Ukraine before it, whose NATO- and European Union-leaning aspirations have been stymied thus far largely due to Russian military and economic pressure. (Moldova’s breakaway province of Transdnistria has been propped by Russian armed forces, and Russian financing, since the early 1990s.) In the interim, Moldova has become a key hub in post-Soviet money-laundering operations, swiping billions from the country along the way.

Dodon has also made a recently play to get in the good graces of Christian fundamentalists in the U.S. and Russia both — even going so far as to pose late last year with Russian neo-fascist Alexander Dugin, a favorite of American white supremacists.

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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Thu Sep 20, 2018 1:18 pm

World Congress of Families ‘Gender Ideology’ Panel Targets Feminism, ‘Perverts,’ Transgender Identity

By Peter Montgomery | September 20, 2018 12:01 pm

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FRC's Peter Sprigg speaking at World Congress of Families summit in Moldova
(Photo: Peter Montgomery/Right Wing Watch)

Among the breakout sessions at the World Congress of Families global summit in Moldova last Friday and Saturday was a panel on “Gender Ideology – The Latest Attack on the Family and the Legal Challenges It Poses.” Like the conference as a whole, the “gender ideology” panel brought U.S. Religious Right activists together with counterparts from Russia and Europe to denounce “myths” about what they portrayed as an authoritarian liberal political ideology around sexuality, sexual orientation, and gender identity.

The Family Research Council’s Peter Sprigg walked the audience through a PowerPoint presentation on “Five Myths of Gender Identity,” which argued that transgender identity is unscientific. He denied that gender transition is ever medically necessary or that discrimination on the basis of gender identity is a form of sex discrimination.

Sprigg’s final “myth” was that the transgender movement is a progressive movement—an odd topic to take on in a setting where “progressive” is a dirty word. Sprigg claimed that many self-identified gays and lesbians are “concerned about the T” because “masculine girls and feminine boys who at one time might have grown up to identify as lesbian women or as gay men are now being told that they are actually the opposite sex.” He also positioned himself, as others on the Right have done, in alliance with some feminists—so-called TERFs—who argue that trans activists are not trying to overcome gender stereotypes but instead are “trying to conform to rigid gender stereotypes of the opposite sex.”

“It would seem more progressive,” said Sprigg, “to simply say that there are different ways to be a boy or a man, and different ways to be a girl or a woman, and none of them require changing your gender or mutilating your body.”

The other American on the panel was Stephen Baskerville, a professor of government at Patrick Henry College, which was founded in 2000 by homeschooling activist Michael Farris, who now heads the Alliance Defending Freedom while remaining chancellor emeritus and professor of government at Patrick Henry.

Baskerville is promoting his book, “The New Politics of Sex: The Sexual Revolution, Civil Liberties, & the Growth of Governmental Power.” After the panel, I picked up a copy. While I haven’t had time to read it yet, I note that among those providing back-cover blurbs is anti-gay activist Austin Ruse, who resists international recognition of the rights of LGBTQ people. Ruse’s blurb reads: “In this new and vitally important contribution to the analysis of the Sexual Revolution, Stephen Baskerville shows how we have become a nation of beta-male Pajama Boys; how it was intentional, where it has taken us, what it portends, and how even conservatives have missed it.”

At the WCF, Baskerville said that sexuality has become a political ideology that is neither about freedom nor equality, but power and authoritarianism. He warned of “dangerous consequences” to the conservative movement’s failure to identify what it is up against.

“The ubiquitous demand for power and empowerment indicates that what we are up against here is something very similar to the movements such as communism or fascism in the last century, and more recently Islamism…”
Baskerville’s comments took a detour into Men’s Rights Activist territory when he declared, “The divorce machinery is the most authoritarian governmental machinery ever created in the English-speaking democracies … It is the model for every other form of authoritarianism that is being used against Christian activists and pro-family activists.”

A speaker who had not been listed on the program was Andrei Tsyganov, an anti-gay activist from St. Petersburg who runs a website called Katyusha. He called “anti-family ideology” a threat to human civilization, and he defended the “propaganda” law adopted in St. Petersburg and then nationally, which has been used against LGBT activists and organizations.

Tsyganov bragged that officials in St. Petersburg have been able to use the propaganda law, and a law against civil society organizations deemed to be foreign agents, to stop pro-LGBT activities. Demonstrating the propensity of some anti-gay activists to equate homosexuality and pedophilia, he accused Great Britain of funding Russian organizations that he said promoted pedophilia.

Christians, he said, have been told a “myth” that they need to be tolerant and obedient. Evil should be opposed, he said, because only if it opposed will it be defeated.

Tsyganov’s website has run its own report on the WCF, which calls Moldovan President Igor Dodon a “hero” for promising to “ban the parade of pederasts” and promoting other “measures to support the family.” Tsyganov calls Russia “the sole guarantor of traditional values and morality in the world,” language similar to that used by American Religious Right figures enamored of Putin’s anti-gay policies.

Another Russian speaker, Olga Letkova, warned that feminist ideology is “very dangerous” because it is the first step toward eliminating boundaries and blurring the borders between male and female that were created by God. She talked about mobilizing parent organizations to fight a proposed law on gender equality, and about resisting sex education in schools, which she said is meant to impose tolerance of “perversions.” She called for people to fight against “ideology aggressively imposed by globalist international structures.”

Xavier Blandin, a Frenchman representing WCF’s parent organization, the International Organization for the Family, cited feminist Simone de Beauvoir’s statement that “one is not born, but rather becomes, a woman” as the root of recent feminist currents. He quoted from the book of Genesis to argue on behalf of the complementarity of the sexes, and to explain why he, “as a Christian as well as a citizen,” fears gender theory and gender studies. It is painful, he said, for Christians to see marriage, a “pillar of our faith,” attacked. If you destroy filiation, he said, you pave the way for medically assisted procreation for homosexual women, and for women gestating babies for others, which is a moral threat to society.

“We have to remain strong on our principles,” he said, as well as open and merciful, to “save our humanity” from “the disaster of individualism” and “aggressive liberalism.”

The session’s moderator, Patrick Byrne, is president of the National Civic Council in Australia and author of a new book, “Transgender: ne shade of gray,” about “the political ideology of transgenderism.”

The book argues that laws that “prioritise the transgender world view” come “at the expense of the inherent rights of those who recognize the biological reality of male and female sex as inherent and immutable.”

“Today, in the name of equality, transgender laws create inequalities and divisions,” concludes Byrne. “In the name of diversity, uniformity is imposed. Under the banner of protection from discrimination, authoritarian laws are imposed.” At WCF, Byrne decried what he described as the medicalization and industrialization of the social construct of transgender identity.


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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Sat Sep 22, 2018 7:58 am

Sammy Feldblum, September 21

Myth Appropriation

Classics scholars confront poorly read pillagers

Greco-Roman antiquity has long had a powerful allure for any charlatan who would drape himself in garments of Serious Thought. Today classical references abound among white nationalists, men’s rights groups, and alt-right leaders, who are especially prone to intellectual pretension. White supremacist sites like National Vanguard and American Renaissance tout Greece and Rome as the “heritage” of the “white race.” Here are alt-right agitators wearing Spartan helmets to free speech rallies in Berkeley; there they are using antique statuary in recruitment flyers on campuses nationwide. One of the most widely cited of academic justifications for supporting Trump for president was penned by the pseudonymous “Publius Decius Mus,” a name taken from a Roman soldier who ritually sacrificed himself in battle to save the nation.

As groups further afringe have lately looted the relics of Greece and Rome, classical scholars have stirred themselves to respond. Since the fall of 2017, the classics blog Pharos has been documenting and challenging misappropriations of classical iconography, inviting classicists to qualify and contextualize claims that, say, a black actor playing Achilles is an affront to everything Homer held dear.

That controversy, over the BBC casting David Gyasi as Achilles in this year’s Troy: Fall of a City, offered a high-profile glimpse into the battle over classical representation. Grievance Politics Twitter pounced on the opportunity to decry political correctness run amok (in much more pointed terms). This May, a bevy of classicists—fifteen in all—wrote in to Pharos to discuss the questions of race in antiquity, including the vagueness in how Homer approached coloration, the attested presence of Ethiopian warriors in the Trojan war, and the idea that Greek views on race were, in fact, less yoked to color than are modern Anglo-American views.

“It was a big moment for us,” says Curtis Dozier, a professor of Greco-Roman history at Vassar and publisher of Pharos. His site had by then been documenting and responding to misappropriations of the classics for six months. Dozier launched the site, he explains, thanks to “a growing realization that all forms of knowledge are implicated in political structures in one way or another. If the people who actually have expertise in that form of knowledge are not the ones activating it politically, then someone else is going to do it for them.”

The site’s hundreds of pageviews per week hardly revolutionize the public understanding of antiquity. But its presence indicates a wider shift in the field’s orientation toward race and politics.

In the nineteenth century, the field of classical studies came under the spell of racial pseudo-science: it was the time of phrenology and human typology, ad hoc justifications for the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and colonialism. Thus did the discipline get carried by the currents of its time, taking a consciously Eurocentric view of a more pan-Mediterranean story. This was the thesis, anyway, of Martin Bernal’s three-volume work Black Athena, whose first installment was published in 1987. Bernal, a British scholar of Chinese history, posited that early classicists ignored evidence of the Phoenician and Egyptian roots of early Greek cultural life. (The Phoenicians were Semitic seafarers and alphabet-toters from what is now Lebanon.) Bernal’s scholarship was sloppy, much of his specific linguistic evidence bunk. But his critique of the discipline’s history hit a nerve, exacerbated, perhaps, by his outsider status. And his thesis has continued to resonate.

Denise McCoskey, professor of classics at Miami University of Ohio and author of Race: Antiquity and Its Legacy, believes the aftershocks of Athena still brace the discipline. “When I got my degree in the ’90s, no one wanted to use the word race,” she recalls. “So it just disappeared. In my opinion, even though people don’t really talk about Black Athena a lot, it really still haunts this whole moment. It was an opportunity for classics to become fundamentally different. And it never really did. You know, talk about the return of the repressed.”

Early classicists traced out a story of antiquity with Europe in a near-solo starring role, and Greece—Athens, particularly—as the starting point of what would become Western Civilization. “But the idea that somehow everything sprung out of the head of Greece, like Athena from the head of Zeus—we know now, we should know, that all civilizations learn from each other,” says Gregson Davis, a professor at Duke. (Davis is a longtime colleague of my mother, herself a historian of classical Rome.) “The Greeks thought that the Egyptians were the source of great wisdom. They didn’t think they invented civilization, by any means. So all the people who have appropriated Greece, you know, have completely distorted the narrative.”

“For people who want to cloak themselves in the Greeks and Romans, I think it’s important to say, ‘they would not recognize you.’”


The idea of an unmixed Europe still holds sway. Steve Bannon has pivoted from American domestic politics to whip up white resentment and resistance to immigration throughout Europe. A year ago, a BBC cartoon that included a dark-skinned man in Roman Britain stirred up a minor firestorm on social media, despite classicists’ support of the historical facts at hand. In envisioning the ancient world, even the color of statuary has an impact, argues Sarah Bond, classics professor at the University of Iowa. In a 2017 essay for the arts publication Hyperallergic, Bond suggests that the popular presentation of Greek and Roman statuary as white marble, rather than in its original polychrome, allows for its use as ammunition by white supremacists who celebrate the blanched marble statuary as “the quintessence of beauty” and “a symbol of white male superiority.” Perhaps predictably, she was mocked and then threatened online, even as Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group, used those statues in recruitment flyers.

But seeing the ancient Mediterranean in full color is far from historical revisionism, says McCoskey of Miami University—not least because Greeks and Romans did not consider themselves white. “From the Romans’ point of view,” she says, “the Germans as people who live in the north are as racially different as the Ethiopians, who live in the south.” The Romans and Greeks, meanwhile, were from the middle of their particular world, and came in an assortment of hues appropriate for their sunny environs.

“For people who want to cloak themselves in the Greeks and Romans, I think it’s important to say, ‘they would not recognize you,’” McCoskey says. “They would not acknowledge that they are anything like you, despite your deep desire to affiliate with them. That doesn’t mean that we can’t talk about them, or think about them, but it does mean that the connection you’re forging is one-way. Because they’re not anticipating you.”

That one-way connection can be built on unlikely foundations. Dozier, Pharos’s publisher, cites Return of Kings, a site that started as a forum for pick-up artists and has edged into white nationalism. “What it says to me is that the white supremacists are always on the lookout for anyone who feels kind of disaffected for any reason, and they see those people as their natural allies,” he says. “They figure out a way to relate whatever local prejudice is there to some kind of racial animus.”

For lost boys in the digital wilderness, disaffection and resentment can offer the bridge into a white supremacist reading of history. Certainty feels good, and rootedness grants a sense of historical place. McCoskey notes, with some trepidation, that this yearning for connection to deep histories is common across groups. Her efforts to disentangle the way that Greeks and Romans thought about race—with no such idea as “whiteness,” and with less emphasis on skin color—from current views are sometimes received by students as a claim that “blackness doesn’t matter today,” she says. “To me, if there’s one part of the project I struggle with the most—one of the figures that I’ve written about is Cleopatra. That’s where a lot of that comes out. Because there are a lot of black women in particular who are deeply invested in a black Cleopatra. For me to say ‘well, she’s racially different from the Romans sometimes, but never for skin color’—that can come across as extremely callous. When you try to rewrite things, you also really have to be careful not to make students think none of it matters.”

That fits with the thrust of Pharos’s project: deconstructing the narratives of white nationalists and men’s-rights groups without throwing out lucid classical scholarship. Readings too explicitly beholden to contemporary concerns can smack of presentism, a heavy-handed application of modern politics onto ancient affairs. Dozier recognizes a certain irony in his site’s self-consciously progressive responses: “I think it can look like what we’re doing is the opposite version of what the white supremacists are doing. I’m actually okay with that. I think there’s some truth to that. It’s probably true of any history, but especially a fragmentary history like ours can be made to mean whatever you want it to mean.”

Yet not all appropriations are created equal. Pharos recently documented white nationalists calling homosexuality in ancient Greece a “myth,” for example—an enormous distortion of settled history. “My appropriations, or Pharos’s appropriations of antiquity, fit better with the evidence and the current state-of-the-art way of interpreting the evidence than the white supremacists’ do,” Dozier says. “From a scholarly or academic point of view, our appropriations are better than theirs. They’re politically better, but they also rely much less on distortions, omissions, and inaccuracies than the ones that you find from the hate groups.”

While Pharos works to counter online misinformation from the digital right-wing, other scholars are following in Bernal’s footsteps and reckoning with the history of the discipline itself. That is a chief aim of Donna Zuckerberg, founder of the progressive journal Eidolon, which writes about classics in a tone accessible to laymen. Dozier recalls dreaming up Pharos after reading a post-election call to action by Zuckerberg, “How to Be a Good Classicist Under a Bad Emperor.” In the essay, she extols classicists to think critically about the political implications of their work on ancient Greece and Rome, since poorly contextualized classical scholarship can become, she writes, “fodder for [the] ludicrous theory that white men are morally and intellectually superior to all other races and genders.”


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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Sun Sep 23, 2018 3:51 pm

A feminist philosopher makes the case against Jordan Peterson

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Sean Illing
Peterson has been called a “sexist” and a “misogynist.” To be honest, I’m not sure this is a fair characterization of his work, but I haven’t read his book, and I haven’t listened to all of his lectures. I’m curious what you think.

Kate Manne
As we’ve chatted about before, I draw a theoretical distinction in my own work between sexism and misogyny (though they are often tangled up in practice). Peterson’s book has numerous sections which I would characterize as sexist because they naturalize and rationalize a patriarchal social order.

Sean Illing
Can you cite specific passages as evidence of this?

Kate Manne
Sure. Here’s a passage that conveys what I’m talking about:

Boys are suffering, in the modern world. They are more disobedient — negatively — or more independent — positively — than girls, and they suffer for this, throughout their pre-university educational career. They are less agreeable (agreeableness being a personality trait associated with compassion, empathy and avoidance of conflict) and less susceptible to anxiety and depression, at least after both sexes hit puberty. Boys’ interests tilt towards things; girls’ interests tilt towards people. Strikingly, these differences, strongly influenced by biological factors, are most pronounced in the Scandinavian societies where gender-equality has been pushed hardest: this is the opposite of what would be expected by those who insist, ever more loudly, that gender is a social construct. It isn’t. This isn’t a debate. The data are in.


This is based more on sexist stereotypes than compelling scientific evidence. And even in the gender progressive environment of Scandinavia that Peterson mentions, it’s not as if all sexism and misogyny has been eradicated overnight; many patriarchal norms linger and are sometimes enforced, or whose breakdown has led to backlash.

As a result, there is currently no control group of people raised in a truly non-patriarchal culture, which is what we’d need to investigate claims that men “naturally” prefer masculine-coded activities and women “naturally” prefer feminine-coded ones.

I also suspect that for many of Peterson’s readers, the sexism on display above is one tool among many to make forceful, domineering moves that are typical of misogyny. And I define misogyny as hostility certain women face because they are women in a man’s world, rather than the hatred men harbor in their hearts toward all or even most women.

Misogyny, to me, is more about policing and controlling women’s behavior. Belittling her intellect or acumen in competitive domains is certainly one way of doing that — especially when backed by the sense that it’s in her womanly nature to be oriented to people rather than abstractions. But that’s a false contrast: You can be both.

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Read more: https://www.vox.com/conversations/2018/ ... philosophy
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Tue Sep 25, 2018 9:18 am

Tweet of the Day: Women not wanting to be slapped on the ass is “identity politics BS” at its worst

Image
Oof.


This guy is an ass, man.

Image

Damn these women and their uppity butts!

Can’t we just go back to the good old days in which men could just go around slapping all the asses they wanted to slap and the women attached to these asses would just giggle and flutter their eyes. Because that was a totally real thing.

But now “identity politics” has gone and ruined this innocent male pleasure, what with women insisting on bodily autonomy and so forth. Because everyone knows that identifying as a person who has the right to control what other people do to their body is the WORST kind of identity politics of all.

I would add more, but as you can see from that tweet’s amazing ratio, plenty of other people have already said plenty to this ass-slapping enthusiast.

Here’s the best rebuttal to non-consensual ass-grabbers that I’ve seen so far.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVefrEkP7Vw


http://www.wehuntedthemammoth.com/2018/ ... its-worst/
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby Karmamatterz » Tue Sep 25, 2018 6:32 pm

• supporting legislation that would give men an edge in child custody battles.


An edge? No, just "equality" and fairness.

Hey American Dream, if you've got a problem with having equality and fairness in family courts for the sake of the children then that's just tough shit buddy. How f*cking moronic. Seriously, I don't give a rats ass if a mod wants to ban me. That is really some ass backwards messed up crap. This kind of drivel continues to be posted in page after after page in this thread. It's a not so clever way to use a broad brush to call all men who expect and deserve fairness in courts to be misogynists, pigs, rapists, sexual harassers, abusers etc...etc...

You ever heard of parental alienation AD? Do you have any idea how it's a tactic used and blindly accepted in the courts? Do you have any idea how family courts function? Ever been divorced? Have any kids?
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Tue Sep 25, 2018 6:37 pm

Context matters- not sure why you excluded it:

American Dream » Thu Sep 13, 2018 7:29 pm wrote: http://blog.iblamethepatriarchy.com/pat ... y-way/mra/

MRAs


Q: What’s an “MRA”?

A: Massively [W]rong Asshole. Or ‘men’s rights activist’.

Q: Why don’t the Odd Lady want none of them in her car?

A: MRAs are patriarchy-deniers. The ideologies of this violent and knobbish subset of the Male Dominion spring from male fear of women’s personal sovereignty, and manifest in practice as active misogyny. Men suffer, O how they suffer, at the hands of subhuman conniving bitches who seek world domination through insane women-are-human propaganda and the misguided attempt to claim their own internal organs as private property. The MRA imagines that women’s interests control and abuse him in an ever more feminized world; he erroneously sees himself as a battered victim of women’s agency, rather than what he actually is: a moron.

The goals of the men’s rights “movement” include, but are not limited to:

• supporting legislation that would give men an edge in child custody battles.
• the right to hijack another human being’s personal uterus if the MRA suspects his sacred genetic material is involved in an embryo contained therein.
• promulgating baseless claims that men are in constant danger of physical assault by legions of villainous females, and that there exists some kind of vast matriarchal conspiracy to cover this up.
• the practice of beating up women, kidnapping her kids, going on the lam, convincing family court judges that the woman is crazy, and summarily escaping jail time.


Anyone who cries “what about the men?” in a radical feminist forum is, whether he likes it or not, an MRA sympathizer.

If you’re ever bored of a rainy afternoon, and feel that an inundation of hate mail and death threats would be just the thing to break up the ennui, try dropping this factbomb at an MRA forum:

“Abusive fathers are far more likely than nonabusive parents to fight for child custody, not pay child support, and kidnap children.”[cite]
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:38 pm

Police intervened to stop a Proud Boy from becoming violent at a 'Free Alex Jones' event in Austin
September 26, 2018

Rachel Janik


Image

At a "Free Alex Jones" demonstration in Austin they claimed was all about free speech, Patriot Prayer and the Proud Boys fell back on their typical playbook: threats and physical intimidation.

Patriot Prayer, a reactionary right-wing group best known for instigating street violence in the Pacific Northwest, traveled to Texas last weekend to protest Alex Jones’ expulsion from various social media platforms, including YouTube and Facebook, for repeated terms of service violations. The small demonstration failed to attract any local attention, but that didn’t stop a leading figure in Patriot Prayer from trying to pick a fight.

An Infowars livestream hosted by Owen Shroyer captured Tusitala “Tiny” Toese — who is an active member of the hate group the Proud Boys in addition to his prominence in Patriot Prayer — screaming at and threatening a small group of young African American men attending Austin’s Pecan Street Festival. According to Shroyer’s commentary, Toese went after them because they were wearing Obama hats.

After a poorly attended rally of about 60 to 70 people earlier in the day, which featured Alex Jones himself as a last-minute surprise guest, right-wing demonstrators took their signs, their message and a bullhorn to the Pecan Street Festival and began, as one organizer put it on Facebook, “trolling 6th” street. Soon after they arrived, Toese, Patriot Prayer leader Joey Gibson and others in the group began what appears in Shroyer's video to be an animated discussion with three young men. According to commentary in the video, demonstrators were upset by their Obama hats, which Shroyer insisted they wore on purpose “just to trigger you,” and they also objected to one man’s sweatshirt, which featured the name and likeness of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“I have a dream to have all-black college graduations at Harvard,” Patriot Prayer supporter Jason Lo can be heard saying on the video, “I have a dream for white genocide.” An unseen person laughs, and he continues. “I have – no, no, no – I have a dream for all police to die!”

“That’s what he said, huh?” someone asked off-camera.

“No, but when you wear an Obama hat and a Martin Luther King sweater, that’s what it means,” Lo said. “Obama is literally a treasonous bastard.”

When two of the men retreat into the store behind them to escape the confrontation, Toese flies into a rage. “You think you a badass? You think you a badass? Get out here!” he yells. “Why you standing there like a little bitch? Bring your ass here, then! Let’s see, let’s see who the little bitch is!”

Gibson reached for Toese’s shoulder, and a demonstrator said, “We come in peace, guys,” but Toese thundered on.

“You won’t survive in my world, boy!” he roared. “You won’t survive in my world!”

“I’ll blow through your fuckin window!” he said, and then two police officers intervened and removed him from the fray.

Toese, who stands at 6 foot 3 inches tall and weighs more than 300 pounds, has developed a reputation for responding with explosive anger when confronted with opposing views. At a Patriot Prayer rally in May 2017, he was caught on video punching a man half his size in the face. Later that summer, he caught a disorderly conduct citation from Portland police for brawling at another protest, and later failed to appear in court on the misdemeanor. In December 2017, he was arrested at yet another demonstration on charges of disorderly conduct, harassment and assault. This June, he and Donovon Flippo, fellow member of the Proud Boys, allegedly violently confronted a man at a Portland area mall. According to the accuser, the men called him a “faggot,” and then Toese punched him in the face, knocking him to the ground.

A man like Toese may seem out of place with a group that claims to “come in peace.” But when Patriot Prayer holds a demonstration, the outcome is rarely peaceful, and Toese is far from the only one throwing punches. Ethan Nordean, aka Rufio Panman, achieved a dubious celebrity on the radical right last June for his participation in an extremely violent Patriot Prayer rally during which one counter-protester was attacked by a group of men, suffering a skull fracture and a brain hemorrhage. Elsewhere that day, Nordean, who is also a member of the Proud Boys (and was wearing the trademark Fred Perry polo for this particular display of violent extremism), decked a man so hard in the face that he apparently knocked him unconscious.

At the Austin rally this weekend, Toese recalled Nordean’s punch fondly and in vulgar detail. “This fool, he literally turned fruit into vegetable that day,” Toese said. “It was amazing!”

Toese went on to articulate Patriot Prayer’s philosophy on free speech far more sincerely than any of his comrades, who prefer lofty platitudes about patriotism and the Constitution.

“My daddy always tell me, you know, ‘If you can’t talk sense into them, smack some sense into them,’” he said.

“Shout out to all my Proud Boys over here,” he continued. “Proud of your boy! Uhuru!”


https://www.splcenter.org/hatewatch/201 ... ent-austin
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Wed Sep 26, 2018 4:48 pm

Josh Bernstein: Christine Blasey Ford Was ‘The Aggressor,’ Brett Kavanaugh Was ‘The Victim’

By Kyle Mantyla | September 26, 2018 10:56 am

Right-wing commentator Josh Bernstein posted a video yesterday baselessly asserting that Christine Blasey Ford was not a victim of sexual assault by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh when both were in high school, but was rather the “aggressor” who is now lashing out at Kavanaugh for rejecting her advances.

“Brett Kavanaugh is not only innocent, but he, in fact, is the victim,” Bernstein said. “It sounds to me as if maybe this is a situation where maybe these girls liked Brett Kavanaugh when he was a youngster and he didn’t like them for whatever reason—maybe he could see through the type of people that they truly are. And it sounds to me as though they were jilted [by] Brett Kavanaugh and now, all these years later, they’re jealous of him because he’s on the way to the Supreme Court and they’re still stuck in academia. I think that that could be a big part of this.”

After reading excerpts from the yearbook from the private all-girls Holton Arms School that Blasey Ford attended, Bernstein concluded that she was likely “the aggressor” in any encounter she had with Kavanaugh.

“Brett Kavanaugh was likely a victim—that’s right, a victim—of Christine Blasey Ford and her Holton Arms sexual culture,” he added. “If anything happened back then, 36 years ago, it’s likely that Miss Ford initiated it and was the aggressor. And if she wasn’t, at the very least, judging by all of the information that we now know about that school, she was a willing and consensual participant.”


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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby Karmamatterz » Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:31 pm

Context matters- not sure why you excluded it:


The whole thing is rubbish. You don't seem to have a clue about family courts and divorce. If you can logically and rationally explain without using any agenda driven ideals about the patriarchy or those meanie men cuz their all pigs I'd be happy to consider your "context."

Frankly you're out of your league when it comes to this topic and better to stop on the divorce crap before it looks any worse.

It's easier to just copy/pasta that come up with your own real world examples.

If any of you haven't seen this it's well worth the time spent.

https://archive.org/details/DivorceCorpDocumentary
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:50 pm

Dude, it's on you to actually lay out some specific claims. Right now you're mostly just blowing steam.

Karmamatterz » Wed Sep 26, 2018 6:31 pm wrote:If you can logically and rationally explain without using any agenda driven ideals about the patriarchy or those meanie men cuz their all pigs I'd be happy to consider your "context."

Frankly you're out of your league when it comes to this topic and better to stop on the divorce crap before it looks any worse.
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Re: Masculinities of the far right

Postby American Dream » Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:48 am

Thoughtful, devastating critique of Jordan Peterson's "12 Rules for Life"

Image

Jordan Peterson is really easy to make fun of -- what with the mystical nonsense and the pseudoscientific evolutionary biology -- but there are millions of (largely white, largely young, largely male) readers who've found his "12 Rules for Life" to be a balm for their souls and a rallying cry for a movement that has legitimized the most murderous strains of toxic masculinity.

In her long, thoughtful -- and ultimately devastating -- Times Literary Supplement critique of Peterson's book, Kate Mann tries to evaluate Peterson on his own terms, taking his arguments seriously enough to engage with, and having engaged with them, reveals their flimsiness, laziness and the convenient elisions and omissions they rely on.


More: https://boingboing.net/2018/05/24/lobst ... holes.html
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