The “Alternative Right"

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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:10 pm

Far-right provocateurs Lauren Southern and Brittany Pettibone met with Russian ultranationalist philosopher Alexander Dugin

June 08, 2018 Hatewatch Staff

On Wednesday, June 6, far-right Canadian YouTube personality Lauren Southern tweeted an image showing that she and far-right American YouTuber Brittany Pettibone had met with the influential ultranationalist Russian philosopher Alexander Dugin.

The meeting represents a surprising generational and geographic convergence. Dugin is very close to powerful Russian Orthodox oligarchs and has been involved in pushing for or facilitating Russian military intervention. He advocates for a united “Eurasian” civilizational bloc led by Russia on the continent, which is shorthand for Russian expansionism. Dugin is known for his elaborate political theory books, which range from the philosophical to the completely mystical. He has been building networks of far-right sympathizers in Europe.

Southern and Pettibone are far-right YouTube personalities popular on the alt-right and associated with its internet culture but known mostly for activist stunts or spreading far-right counter-narratives on the platform.

One link, however, is that Southern and Pettibone have been closely affiliated with the far-right, anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim identitarian activists of the group Defend Europe. Pettibone and Defend Europe head Martin Sellner are a couple. Some identitarian thinkers have been involved in Dugin’s networks and projects.

Defend Europe has drawn attention for a series of anti-immigrant PR stunts. In August of last year, they chartered a boat to patrol the Mediterranean, supposedly to send migrants home and to monitor NGO rescue boats, which they accuse of human trafficking.

In April 2018, Defend Europe activists climbed the Alps to install a plastic fence on a summit to “protect the border.” They then patrolled the area and hunted down migrants to hand them off to law enforcement. Pettibone and Southern were present for both “missions.”

Defend Europe has suffered a series of recent setbacks. Seventeen Austrian identitarians, Sellner included, are being prosecuted in Austria. Hungarian and French identitarians were banned from Facebook and Instagram in the last two months. Sellner, Southern, Pettibone and the Hungarian identitarian leader Abel Bodi were also prevented from entering the United Kingdom in March 2018.


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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Sun Jun 10, 2018 1:26 pm

https://www.patreon.com/richardseymourwtf

Richard Seymour Jun 7 at 12:25pm

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Note on fragility

The deprecation of 'fragility' acquired a certain glamour as part of online snark a few years ago. White fragility, male fragility; white tears, male tears.

The snark, though it stopped being funny almost as quickly as it started, has a basis in reality. There are times when one yearns for people offended by, for example, an all-female Ghostbusters, or who find their childhood ruined by a female Sherlock, not to be such particularly moist cupcakes. Or take the battery of psychic defences arising, say, in response to a claim of racism: how tiresome that becomes, and how quickly. Hence: your tears of unfathomable sadness are so delicious.

But what do we actually want here? The logic of the snark is that one wants "whiteness" or "masculinity" (to truck in such reified quantities for the sake of this argument) to be less fragile. To man up, as it were. To not be such snowflakes.

But arguably they are not, in themselves, 'fragile'. These ideologies merely fail at their psychic task of managing and suppressing fragility, which as a grundnorm is just part of the quiddity of mortal experience. Even if we are, in Macintyre's formulation, "dependent rational animals", a certain type of fragility comes with dependence. In psychoanalytic terms, we are castrated, and "whiteness" or "masculinity" are ways of pretending otherwise.

Isn't this obvious in the way that alt-right trolls immediately react to their displeasure by, for example, sending rape threats, death threats, racist abuse, and so on? Don't they invariably, and with sadistic glee, assert their power? Sure, they're fragile, susceptible to narcissistic injury, moronic, kidding themselves, capable of wildly misunderstanding their own feelings about things: just like everyone else.

At the extreme end, where the online sadist becomes a form of meatspace troll, as with the murderers Elliot Rodgers and Alek Minassian, there is no limit to the sense of persecution and narcissistic injury they give vent to.

No doubt, these are 'fragile' individuals, and highly dangerous on that account. However, without gainsaying the damage that ideologies of "whiteness" and "masculinity" can do, it seems likely that people like Rodgers and Minassian arrive at their specific right-wing ideologies as an answer to, and ideological explanation and cover-up job for, this fragility. These ideologies say, if I appear fragile it is because the world has turned against me, and is trying to castrate me.

This is also missed in certain worthy, sanctimonious online commentary (think Huffpo, think Mic) where, for example, writers of a vaguely feminist hue attempt a more sympathetic approach to "male fragility". Sometimes this comes from the 'good man', the My Little Phoney of 'male feminism', whose unconscious is basically binders full of women. It is, they say, a cry for help. A tacit recognition of the injuries of masculinity, and the way it emaciates a fuller human experience. This approach calls for men to engage in introspection and overcome their fragility by relinquishing that which is hurting them.

Again, this has some basis in experience. But to make a big drama of fragility, (as, to be fair, the internet does with everything), is also getting things the wrong way round. The fragility is to be expected, an unfortunate but ineluctable reality. The 'cry for help', if such there is, typically appears as a rhetoric of omnipotence and invulnerability.

Perhaps it is significant that, at this moment, we have become culturally obsessed with fragility. If both SJWs and alt-rights berate their opponents for fragility, albeit in very different ways, does this suggest that abruptly we're more aware of personal fragility as a political problem? Does it, precisely because of its snarky format, betray an anxiety about the subject? Doesn't the humour seem a little forced by now? As though, any minute now, we might just start falling to pieces?
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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Tue Jun 26, 2018 1:18 pm

Students rely on alt-right internet sites as credible sources for their research papers

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Examining alt-right websites
The question becomes, then, what should teachers do regarding these sites? Is it the responsibility of teachers to actually do anything?

Instead of ignoring these sites, I’d suggest teachers might do best to teach students how to critically examine the sites. In order to do that, however, teachers must know what is out there. While this is not an exhaustive list, the following six alt-right websites were most commonly cited by teachers as those that students use for their papers.

They are: National Policy Institute, Radix Journal, American Renaissance, Taki’s Magazine and Voat.

In open-ended follow-up questions, teachers added that students find the information on these sites appealing but are unable to differentiate between fact and fiction.

In classroom spaces, teachers will inevitably teach students who come from a variety of backgrounds and who hold different beliefs, ideas and opinions. Still, it is a teacher’s job to encourage objective, fact-based thinking to the students in their care. Awareness of pseudo-scientific “White identity” sites like Radix and American Renaissance allows teachers to deconstruct those sites with students, encourage critical reading, and debate the validity and value of the content.

Uncomfortable subject matter
Teachers responding to my survey report that they are uncomfortable teaching about these websites because they are certain they have “at least some” students who agree with the alt-right sites in question. The teachers also believe that teaching about these websites in class would lead to uncomfortable conversations.

As teachers, it is not our job to indoctrinate students to think as we do. However, it is our job to teach facts. Creating a safe classroom climate will allow for these uncomfortable conversations where close examinations of the opinions presented on these websites can be examined in a dispassionate way. For example, Radix Journal recently featured an article that “Martin Luther King Jr., a fraud and degenerate in his life, has become the symbol and cynosure of White Dispossession and the deconstruction of European civilization.” It is reasonable to expect heated student disagreement around an article like this one. This, then, opens up space to teach students how to engage in respectful and difficult conversations with one another.

Lessons of this sort would certainly involve countering misinformation that is put forward on these sites. For example, after looking at the Radix Journal article that attacks Martin Luther King Jr., it would be appropriate to have students consider “Three Visions for Achieving Equal Rights,” a lesson with primary sources from the organization Facing History and Ourselves. Beyond this point-counterpoint, students need to be given tools to evaluate the validity of the information they encounter while doing research. One excellent tool to do this, “Evaluating Online Resources,” comes from the project Teaching Tolerance, and helps students evaluate online sources. Regardless of the resource used, students need to be pushed to consider who the author is, his or her bias, and the purpose of the article.


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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Wed Jun 27, 2018 6:02 pm

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Jack Posobiec and Laura Loomer Fight for Credit Over Vegas Shooting Conspiracy Theory

Trump supporters toasted the president’s birthday month with a high tea on Sunday at the Trump International Hotel. The attractions included a fashion show with dresses from a pro-Trump designer and, in a nod to the North Korea summit, a model walking the runway to the North Korean national anthem.

But the behatted women who came to enjoy a “Tea for Trump” also found themselves caught in the middle of a simmering feud that’s tearing apart the fractious community of Trump-world “citizen journalists.”

Inside the event, pugnacious pro-Trump social media personality Jack Posobiec addressed the crowd in a speech from the runway. Meanwhile, in the hotel lobby, fellow Trumpian provocateur Laura Loomer stewed over getting banned from the event.

“Jack just had me canceled,” Loomer told The Daily Beast.

Posobiec and Loomer were once allies, rising to prominence together last year after they shouted down a Central Park production of Julius Caesar because featured a Trump lookalike in the climactic stabbing. But now they’re at odds over who deserves credit for “reporting” on a dangerous, obviously fake conspiracy theory about the Las Vegas massacre last year.

Like many popular fringe internet theories, the Las Vegas conspiracy theory pushed by Loomer and Posobiec is more about “asking questions” than presenting any coherent single narrative. Sometimes left-wing antifa activists were involved in the shooting, in this telling, sometimes it was ISIS, and sometimes the two groups were working together. And many of the strands of the theory often converge on an Australian man who citizen journalists on the right have tied, without credible evidence, to the shooting.

In March, Loomer reported for a website owned by British provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos that members of Congress had been briefed on “ISIS ties” to the shooting.

Three months later, Posobiec, now a reporter at the pro-Trump One America News, announced that his network would air a segment called “Inside Las Vegas” that explored other theories about the shooting. Loomer cried foul, telling her more than 170,000 Twitter followers that Posobiec had taken her reporting without credit.

“I just thought it was really shady how Jack calls himself my friend, but then he won’t give me credit for my work,” Loomer said.

The conspiracy theory promoted by both Loomer and Posobiec is based on an unofficial report that has circulated since the shooting.

The report, produced by a group called Americans for Intelligence Reform, centers on an Australian man who was also staying at the Mandalay Bay resort when Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock launched his attack from his own hotel room.

The evidence connecting the Australian man to the shooting or ISIS and antifa is incredibly flimsy.

For example, the Australian man, according to the report, has been to Melbourne, Australia. Unrelated social media pages suggest that Melbourne has an antifa chapter. Therefore: an antifa connection.

The ISIS connections are just as dubious. For example, the Australian man posted a Facebook post geotagged to another hotel near Las Vegas at one point. The report then claims that another man from a Mexican state where an ISIS recruiter was caught years earlier stayed at the hotel — then uses that to claim an ISIS connection to the Las Vegas shooting.

Days after the shooting, the report alleges, the Australian man went to a kebab shop in New Mexico that’s owned by a man from Turkey. The reports notes that ISIS does operate cells in Turkey, a country of nearly 80 million people.

The conspiracy theory centering on the Americans for Intelligence Reform report has even reached Congress, with Rep. Scott Perry (R-Pa.) baffling Fox News viewers in January by claiming that the Las Vegas shooting featured “terrorist infiltration through the southern border.”

Despite the nonexistent connection between the Australian man and the shooting, several right-wing websites have whipped up social media mobs against him. Along with Posobiec and Loomer, Big League Politics and InfoWars have run stories on the Australian man.

Previewing his OAN report, Posobiec published the Americans for Intelligence Reform report, which includes a picture of the man’s driver’s license, his home address, and what is purportedly his Social Security number.

Tensions between Loomer and Posobiec over who deserved credit for the conspiracy theory escalated after the OAN report aired. In a since-deleted tweet on June 17, Posobiec boasted that his network was “slashing the tired fake news one inflated narrative at a time!”

Loomer took that as an allusion to a comical incident that has dogged her for nearly a year. In August 2017, Loomer posted pictures of a deflated car tire, claiming that one of her tires had been slashed. But closer inspection of the tire suggested that the holes in the tire were more likely just the result of dry rot.

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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby elfismiles » Fri Jun 29, 2018 10:49 am

Bad Religion - "The Kids Are Alt-Right"

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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Sat Jun 30, 2018 5:26 pm

Exclusive: Accused Annapolis shooter Jarrod Ramos had dark links to the alt-right

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The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

“To oversimplify, the primary targets will not be enemy soldiers;” Hill wrote, “instead, they will be political leaders, members of the hostile media, cultural icons, bureaucrats, and other of the managerial elite without whom the engines of tyranny don’t run.”

Ramos first contacted Hutson through Twitter, the latter recalls, after "the Capital Gazette published a piece about how I had alerted the FBI about mass shooting threat suspect David Lenio,” Hutson said.

After Hutson tweeted about the story, Ramos tweeted a couple of disturbing responses, first asking “Were any school children intimidated?” then claiming that Lenio “had won”:


“The piece highlighted the fact that I was also researching and writing about Michael Peroutka, for example, in the pages of Huffington Post,” Hutson noted. “I documented Michael Peroutka’s support for the League of the South [here], a right-wing group that advocated death squads, assassinating journalists, elected officials, and other members of the elite,” he explained. He questioned and challenged Peroutka "about his support for the League of the South, and that led to a lot of public attention,” which he also wrote about for Huffington Post.

Although Ramos didn’t contact Hutson at the time, he was clearly not pleased with the critical coverage of Peroutka, fusing his own lawsuit-fueled enmity toward the Capital Gazette with his enthusiasm for the pro-Confederate candidate:


Ramos was also given to self-inflation, putting on both literary and moralistic airs. In court documents, Hutson noted, he referred to himself as a crusader. Like his hero, Peroutka, this would effectively place himself above ordinary human law.

“His defense of Michael Peroutka is particularly interesting, since his views seem to echo Peroutka, a local politician and think tank leader, and other elements of the theocratic far right,” Clarkson added.

When Peroutka did manage a narrow victory that November — with signs that illegal robocalls helped put him over the top, Ramos’ tweet seemed over the top as well:


In fairness, none of Ramos' tweets overtly screams “potential mass murderer.” They’re indicative of someone stewing in resentment, but that’s hardly unusual in this day and age. Except for his Twitter avatar — that’s a whole different story.

“The image used in Ramos' Twitter profile is an image not of himself," Hutson observes, but of former Capital Gazette columnist Eric Hartley, against whom Ramos held a grudge. “He placed a symbol on Hartley’s forehead and the symbol is a brand of sacrifice, marking a target for ritual murder,” Hutson explained. “It may have Celtic origins, but it is used in a Japanese manga series called ‘Berserk,’ and it’s called ‘the brand of sacrifice.’

“For years Ramos stewed in his embitterment, over the newspaper's coverage of his unsuccessful defamation case and the newspaper's coverage of his stalking by Facebook of a woman with whom he had gone to high school. But he didn't act,” Huston summed up. “So the question is, what triggered him?”

Several things are worth considering, Hutson suggested. “Ramos tweeted about only two political figures, Trump and Michael Peroutka -- but he also tweeted to me after the Capital Gazette had written about me.”

The content of that story was significant. That was when Hutson wrote about Peroutka's ties to the League of the South, and its support of "death squads to assassinate journalists." These were all pieces of a puzzle Ramos had been playing around with for years, Hutson believes.

“So what happened this past week?” Hutson asked. “On June 25, Trump – at his South Carolina rally – pointed to members of the media, and called them the enemy of the people. This is a phrase that throughout history has been used by autocrats to incite violence,” from ancient Rome to the French Revolution to Nazi Germany.

That's not all that occurred last week, Hutson noted. On Tuesday, Peroutka, an Anne Arundel County councilman, was defeated for re-election, losing in the Republican primary to a female challenger. That may not be coincidental, Hutson suspects.

There are also darker long-simmering elements that may have helped prepare the way. Hutson sees an “overall pattern" of "homicidal ideation," starting with Ramous replacing the bloody severed head in a famous Charlie Hebdo cartoon with the face of Garrett Hartley, the Capital Gazette columnist:


Ramos was actually recycling an even earlier image, which was even less coherent:


Ramos also tweeted at Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell, criticizing him for relegating coverage of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to page 2. Then he wrote, “je suis CapGazNews,” a direct reference to the hashtag that followed the Charlie Hebdo massacre. As Hutson reads this, Ramos was already thinking of a mass shooting at Capital Gazette in the context of his reflections on Charlie Hebdo


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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Sun Jul 01, 2018 9:20 am

On the far right, shooting at Maryland newspaper draws praise, celebration

“Wowza. Maybe it was a Jew, but probably a goy,” wrote AltonRocht, on The Daily Stormer. “Let’s try to push an offensive narrative for this. The media, and the anti-white forces in American mean that these shootings will grow more frequent.”

Police arrested Jarrod Warren Ramos, a 38-year-old white man with a long history of grievances against the newspaper. He’s charged with five counts of first-degree murder.

The shooting came just days after President Donald Trump, at a campaign rally, pointed to a group of reporters and called them the “enemy of the American people” and alt-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos said he couldn’t “wait for the vigilante squads to start gunning journalists down on sight.”

Yiannopoulos later referred to the comment as a joke, saying he wasn’t serious and police haven’t commented on a motive.

Andrew Anglin, the blogger and primary voice behind the racist and antisemitic website The Daily Stormer, posted a long diatribe about Yiannopoulos on Friday morning, and dismissed the deaths of the five journalists at the end.

"But seriously — just straight talk here — there is no single group of people on the planet that is more deserving of just getting gunned down like animals," Anglin wrote.

For far-right adherents, the shooting spurred on conspiracies and celebration that journalists, never a popular group with the alt-right, were dead.

“Is there only 2 options here,” wrote a poster going by “Lucky” on Daily Stormer. “1. The beginning of our side taking out the real enemy. 2. False flag attack. If it was our guy, they would have killed him. So strange, how kikes pretending to be white, get taken alive.”

Christopher Cantwell, best known as the “Crying Nazi” after the Unite the Right rally, kept his thoughts simple: “#MAGA” posted over a picture of Yiannopoulos and a Drudge Report headline “Shooting at Newspaper.”

“They should live in fear,” tweeted @WarthogJim, whose account was suspended Friday morning.

Alt-right activist Laura Loomer tied the shootings to recent comments from U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, a California Democrat who called for Trump administration staffers to be harassed while out in public.

“I wonder if the shooter in Annapolis today is a supporter of @RepMaxine Waters …” Loomer wrote on Twitter shortly after the shooting took place.

Others took on the reporters as a stereotype, lumping everyone working in journalism into a group up to no good.

“If they work for a newspaper, they’ve got to be douchebags,” wrote @GabrielWest, posting as “Joe Lincoln” on Twitter. “Fuck’em. #Kapow #LyingLeftistLosers #FuckTheLeftistMedia.”


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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:30 pm

The Aggressiveness of Vulnerability

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Nagle proposed a direct correlation between the electoral victory of Donald Trump and the ascendency of this new form of Right-wing politics, examined through the prism of its digital fingerprints. Directly challenging the enthusiasm that many on the Left attached to the expansion of the internet world in the 2010s, leading cyberutopians to herald it as a “new leaderless form of digital revolution,” Nagle claimed that there was nothing particularly progressive about this development. In a journey that took her readers from the 4chan discussion forums praising school shootings to the women-hating trolls that fueled Gamergate, Nagle noted that the formal absence of leaders, a fetishism of spontaneity, and the unquestioned embrace of “transgression” mesmerized Left-cyberutopians into ignoring the “philosophical, moral or conceptual content” of the cardinal actors and ideas behind this facade of online freedom. “No matter how networked, “transgressive,” social media savvy or non-hierarchical a movement may be,” wrote Nagle, “it is the content of its ideas that matter.” And this content represented, for Nagle, a fusion between the obscure world of online pranksters, Pepe-loving trolls and hateful nerds with white-supremacist figures and controversial alt-Right celebrities.

A key concept that can explain this consolidation of reaction is, according to Nagle, the concept of “transgression,” denoting pushing beyond the limits of societal norms and embracing a rebellious attitude towards established hierarchies, praised in the past as almost synonymous with radical and Left/progressive ideas and movements. Kill All Normies (KAN) argued that the strategy of transgression has been effectively recuperated by the alt-Right, acting as a unifying principle between the formerly marginalized milieus of online hackers and trolls and the (equally marginalized) extreme Right-wing scenes. Against this, Nagle advanced a rethinking of the concept itself. Rejecting the claim that transgressive attitudes have been beneficial to progressive/Left movements in the past, she argued that the association between transgression and the Left was in fact “superficial and historically accidental.” The recent appropriation of transgressive outlooks by the reactionary Right simply made public what was only latent. In this context, Nagle argued, transgression should be abandoned altogether.

Nagle developed her argument through an exposition of the online cultural wars that came to the fore in the years before the election. Using the baffling explosion of “Gamergate” (a euphemism for an extremely misogynistic online crusade) as an entry-point, she pointed at the emergence of an undercurrent which allowed for a connection between (mostly male) computer nerds and the new Right to flourish. Her short exposé of this vile story allows one to discern that, hidden behind an irrelevant grievance supposed to be about computer games, Gamergate revealed a number of developing anxieties: a loss of a sense of (male) entitlement, a perceived threat towards an existing (gaming) community by (women) “outsiders,” perhaps even a fear that the entrance of women into this job market indicated diminishing prospects for those nerds who saw themselves as more deserving candidates. In defining its anxieties however, this online community of isolated individuals also defined its enemies, which in the case of “Gamergate” meant those who stood in defense of the abused women. With a little help from its prospective fascist friends, this category of the “enemy” was conceptualized in such a way so as to include all “progressives,” feminists, liberals, or (as they became known) “social justice warriors” (SJW). The first step for a common ground between anti-social geeks and the alt-Right was set.

To its merit, KAN notices that the alt-Right is not composed of traditional Right-wing supporters. Seeing this new Right formation as a mere continuation of age-old conservatism, according to Nagle, does little to explain the bizarre alliance of early anonymous hackers, politically-incorrect pranksters, and outright racists, and/or misogynists. Traditional conservatives who still feel relatively comfortable justifying and sustaining established systems of structural discrimination (such as racism and anti-feminism 1 are hardly the natural allies of the transgressive humor of the online trolls, their pornographic aesthetics, or their embrace of offensive satire as a “weapon of critique.” Narcissistically defining the “average person in the street” as a mirror image of their own values, traditional Right-wingers continue to view “conservatism” as the defining characteristic of the majority of the population, a viewpoint categorically at odds with the attitudes of the online alt-Right and the transgressive piss-takes of dominant moral values by its online allies.

Instead, Nagle suggests that the ideas of thinkers such as Oswald Spengler or Pat Buchanan are better suited to explain the alt-Right. This particular tradition of thought had for many years tried unsuccessfully to create its own niche and to push the Right (and the Republican party) away from its historical accommodation with mainstream liberalism, mainly by fixating on issues that one was supposedly “not allowed to speak about.” Already in 1988, paleoconservative Paul Gottfried had claimed that “political differences between Right and Left have by now largely been reduced to disagreements over policies designed to achieve comparable moral goals.” By linking mainstream liberalism and political correctness to the conspiracy theory concerning the hegemony of “cultural Marxism,” certain key ideas of these forgotten but not extinct paleoconservatives appealed to both the alt-Right and the (already groomed) online trolls and hacker freaks. Instead of dismissing these internet figures for their transgressive outlook, the alt-Right was very much concerned with widening the perspective of the prankster-type, anti-PC online types, and, taking its cue straight from paleoconservative sensitivities, to infuse them with its version of contemporary nationalism/patriotism and a reaffirmation of a supposedly undermined “white” identity, a focus that clearly prioritizes “internal enemies.” To a certain extent, this approach fit quite well with Trump’s electoral promise to abandon global interventionism and concentrate instead on an internal “re-adjustment. 2 Identifying with the idea that “the decline of the West” is the result of the multiculturalist, liberal, politically correct and globalized values shared by the entire political establishment, the alt-Right resurrected a significant split that had plagued the US conservative Right since the 1960s, placing themselves at the top in the process. As a result, for Nagle and other commentators, the combination of the above sensitivities and the use of transgressive and anti-SJW attitudes and practices of the online world mobilized a significant amount of support for Trump which, in conjunction with the solid support of Republican voters, allowed him to win the presidency.

“There’s no such thing as a harmless joke” [The Moldy Peaches]

The question begs itself: if these characters and ideas came together during the “online culture wars,’ who stood at the other side of the trenches? Nagle’s answer to this question is one of the reasons why KAN has made “both ends of the identity politics spectrum feel aggrieved,” as Catherine Liu noted in the LA Review of Books. For one of the central arguments of the book that separates it from other texts on the topic is that the growing influence of the alt-Right and its online acolytes was to a large extent premised on their opposition to the liberal/Left’s understanding, promotion, and normalization of its version of identity politics.

This argument is perhaps single-handedly responsible for the viciously negative reactions that Nagle’s book has faced from the “progressive left,” or those parts of the left that have embraced identity politics. For those unfamiliar with the favored forms of “interaction” of the online identity camp, the amount of hate that the book has received might appear puzzling. There appears, at first sight, nothing particularly controversial in claiming that many alt-Right figures built their careers by ridiculing the excesses and irrationalities of so-called “social justice warriors.” But for those more aware of the toxicity of online culture, there is (unfortunately) nothing surprising about the identitarian reaction. In fact, Nagle’s book itself contains an expose of the online identitarian camp that can be used to predict, point-by-point, the reactions it generated.


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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:59 am

Alt-Right YouTuber Jean-François Gariépy Just Lost Both Of His Co-Hosts

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As for Emily Youcis, her departure was even less amicable. It seems that during past appearances Youcis’ rhetoric was so extreme that it caused his channel to receive a “strike” for violating YouTube’s hate speech guidelines. In episode 68, titled “Re-Educating Emily About YouTube Terms,” Gariépy explained that bigoted remarks would no longer be tolerated during his livestreams.

Youcis, who on a previous episode suggested that whites “nuke” the African continent, constantly struggled to abide by these guidelines as Gariépy grew increasingly frustrated. During a discussion of the first transgender “Miss Universe” contestant, Youcis disparaged her as “it” and a “tranny,” and asked viewers if they would “smash or pass.” Gariépy put her on mute and asked, “Can you learn from the full hour that I’ve spent training you?”

Evidently the answer was no, because minutes later Youcis laughed at a story of migrants drowning after their boat capsized, and said, “You know if they keep doin’ this we’re not even gonna have to nuke Africa!” Gariépy muted her again. “What the fuck is happening with you Emily?” he asked. “It’s like you have the memory of a fucking fish.” And he announced that this episode would be deleted altogether.

In the July 4th video Gariépy told viewers that Youcis had been fired because she was a detriment to the existence of his channel and refused to tone down her remarks. “And to be honest,” he continued, “I’ll tell you that even if I don’t have a [personal] stance against hate speech, to be honest people who do hate speech usually, they don’t have much else to say. And that was the case with Emily.”

He was also tired of her wild-eyed conspiracy theories, including one from their now-deleted episode in which she posited that the people behind I Am Jazz — a television show about a transgender teenager — were Satan-worshipers, and that gender confirming surgery is a Satanic ritual.


https://angrywhitemen.org/2018/07/12/al ... more-46282
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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby Elvis » Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:31 am

Interesting factoid:

Percentage of Americans who consider themselves members of the “alt-right” : 3

Who have never heard of the alt-right : 5


https://harpers.org/archive/2018/07/har ... july-2017/
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Re: The “Alternative Right"

Postby American Dream » Sat Jul 14, 2018 3:46 pm

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