Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Moderators: Elvis, DrVolin, Jeff

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby American Dream » Fri Aug 10, 2018 5:58 pm

I read the tea leaves- even the dreck thrown out by the corporate hegemonic monster. It's amazing the insights you can glean if you read carefully and don't simply believe.


dada » Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:53 pm wrote:
American Dream » Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:15 am wrote:That's why there should be an Illuminati/Elders subcommittee which rules every publication everywhere with an iron hand. But there isn't!


Pretty much the Western media strategy in a nutshell. Spin the narrative to manufacture consent for soviet-style censorship of news media in the West. Working like a charm, I'd say.

Well, at least they didn't have to resort to strategy of tension tactics to do it this time. That can get expensive. And who pays the bill? The taxpayer. So really we should be thanking the Kremlin.

The question now, I guess, is who will run the American samizdat. Because we can't leave that up to the people. That is not the new way.
American Dream
 
Posts: 19946
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby dada » Fri Aug 10, 2018 6:56 pm

American Dream wrote:I read the tea leaves- even the dreck thrown out by the corporate hegemonic monster. It's amazing the insights you can glean if you read carefully and don't simply believe.


Yeah, I just don't trust the readings I get from these automatically generated 'random' divinators. I think it's like those electronic poker machines, or slots. They're not really random, there's some algorithm at work underneath.

It's like River Raid, created by Carol Shaw for Activision. She used a pseudo-random generator to draw the contours of the river. Genius bit of programming, the riverbanks always draw the same every new game, but without wasting precious code space.
Both his words and manner of speech seemed at first totally unfamiliar to me, and yet somehow they stirred memories - as an actor might be stirred by the forgotten lines of some role he had played far away and long ago.
User avatar
dada
 
Posts: 1844
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 12:08 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby Grizzly » Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:04 pm

^^^ You mean William Burroghs style cut up's?? ...lol
If Barthes can forgive me, “What the public wants is the image of passion Justice, not passion Justice itself.”
User avatar
Grizzly
 
Posts: 3312
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2011 4:15 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby dada » Fri Aug 10, 2018 11:00 pm

Sure, why not. An order underneath the apparent chaos. Whose order is it? The one who sees it.
Both his words and manner of speech seemed at first totally unfamiliar to me, and yet somehow they stirred memories - as an actor might be stirred by the forgotten lines of some role he had played far away and long ago.
User avatar
dada
 
Posts: 1844
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 12:08 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby Grizzly » Sat Aug 11, 2018 2:05 am

who makes the grass, green?
If Barthes can forgive me, “What the public wants is the image of passion Justice, not passion Justice itself.”
User avatar
Grizzly
 
Posts: 3312
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2011 4:15 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby Sounder » Sun Aug 12, 2018 10:50 am

AD wrote....
That's why there should be an Illuminati/Elders subcommittee which rules every publication everywhere with an iron hand. But there isn't!


I think we can take that as a clear vote for social engineering.

So, how does that work where a voice for the 'common people' thinks the common people are too stupid to think for themselves?

Are Eric Schmitt and the Bildabergers the Elders that are qualified to 'finally' bring social justice to a bigot filled world?
All these things will continue as long as coercion remains a central element of our mentality.
Sounder
 
Posts: 4054
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:49 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby dada » Sun Aug 12, 2018 11:48 am

I took ADs comment to be sarcastic.

Who maketh the grass the green hue of sarcastic text?
Both his words and manner of speech seemed at first totally unfamiliar to me, and yet somehow they stirred memories - as an actor might be stirred by the forgotten lines of some role he had played far away and long ago.
User avatar
dada
 
Posts: 1844
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 12:08 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby American Dream » Sun Aug 12, 2018 12:02 pm

Yeah, they were highly sarcastic. Shoulda used green, I guess. ..
American Dream
 
Posts: 19946
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby dada » Sun Aug 12, 2018 12:19 pm

Nah, don't use green. Rainbow fonts make the baby jesus cry.

"Who is the master who makes the text green?" gives some insight into the zen koan. Who reads a sarcastic tone in words written in black text?
Both his words and manner of speech seemed at first totally unfamiliar to me, and yet somehow they stirred memories - as an actor might be stirred by the forgotten lines of some role he had played far away and long ago.
User avatar
dada
 
Posts: 1844
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 12:08 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby American Dream » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:14 am

http://www.tango-noir.com/2017/12/19/ru ... ul-idiots/

Russia’s New ‘Useful Idiots’?

Posted on 19th December 2017

There are echoes of Soviet times in the way Russia has been courting far-right activists in the West. A new book looks at how and why it does it.

By Bradley Jardine

Image
Illustration by Alessandra Cugno.

Remember Richard Spencer, the U.S. white supremacist whose “alt-right” followers celebrated Donald Trump’s presidential election victory with a show of Nazi salutes?

Back in 2011, Spencer was appearing in another guise, as an expert on Libya, on Russia’s English-language propaganda channel RT. Deriding the West’s strategy, he accused NATO of siding with the “thugs” who killed the Libyan dictator — and erstwhile Western ally — Muammar Gaddafi.

Given the chaos in Libya since, Spencer’s argument hardly looks controversial now. But that’s not why RT and other Russian state-controlled outlets have been so keen to book him and other Western far-right activists as guests.

For the Kremlin’s information machine, these activists serve a bigger purpose, to help promote the narrative of the West in chaos — and thereby also boost the idea of Russia as the alternative global power.

In effect, they are a new version of the “useful idiots” — the term coined for Western supporters of the early communist regime, whom Lenin, and then later Stalin, happily exploited.

But is Russia’s reach-out to the far right actually effective? And how has the Kremlin cultivated the relationship? “Tango Noir: Russia and the Western Far Right,” a new book by Anton Shekhovtsov, who is a specialist on extremist networks, provides some of the answers.

Swastikas on Synagogues
The dance begins between the two world wars, when the Bolsheviks tried and failed to exploit unrest in Germany, then hobbled by reparations demands. But it was with the onset of the Cold War that Moscow really stepped up efforts to use far-right elements abroad — with the nascent West Germany as its initial target.

The KGB ordered its agents to paint swastikas on synagogues. And it worked, according to Shekhovtsov, as West German officials began to question the country’s membership of NATO, in fear of a Nazi resurgence. There was an added bonus. International attitudes towards Soviet-backed East Germany (the German Democratic Republic) improved.

The reality was more complex. Germany’s leaders had been taking a more lenient approach to former Nazis at the time, or so people thought. Many had been given state jobs. But the KGB saw the opportunity, looking for institutional weaknesses and apparent policy contradictions to exploit — much as its successor, the FSB, does today.

This early history of Russia’s dalliance with the Western far right is fascinating, but Shekhovtsov’s main interest is rightly in how it has played out under Vladimir Putin.

Information War Watershed
And in his chronology, 2008 was the watershed moment — when the Kremlin decided to adopt a full-scale information war strategy towards the West.

Russia’s invasion of Georgia that year was an international public relations disaster. Moscow may have won militarily, but it lost the battle for global hearts and minds. Condemnation was so severe that Putin cried conspiracy. “The West has a powerful propaganda machine” he complained.

To fight back, the Russian leadership decided it needed a new approach —- to undermine the West’s faith in its own political system. The spearhead was Russia Today. Created in 2005, the channel’s name was shortened to RT in 2009 as its controllers aimed for a global audience. And the disruptive message of the Western far-right was a perfect fit for the narrative it wanted to propagate.

Shekhovtsov identifies three main elements in the Russian disinformation strategy that has evolved. The first is “nudge propaganda,” using fringe activists from the far-right and other groups to promote Russian interests.

‘Narrative Laundering’
The second is “narrative laundering,” in effect creating and spreading fake news, with the original source obscured. When it works, conspiracy theories are “laundered” into mainstream discourse.

The third main tactic is selective sourcing. RT’s coverage of riots that broke out in the Swedish capital, Stockholm, in 2013, were a case in point. Its reports focused on the story of a man wielding a machete who was not of Swedish origin, which the country’s far right turned into a signature cause. And more than half the people RT interviewed for a segment entitled “They Don’t Want to Integrate” turned out to have far-right links.

Far right groups have also helped give a veneer of legitimacy to Russia’s annexation of Crimea by sending observer missions to monitor elections there. And Shekhovtsov shows how these missions have helped build deeper ties between far-right activists and the Kremlin officials of today.

It is surprising though that the author does not consider Brexit and the claims of shadowy Russian involvement with the ultra-nationalist UK Independence Party (UKIP), which led the campaign to take Britain out of the European Union. And he seems to have published too soon to consider the allegations of widespread Russian interference in the US presidential election, including linkages with America’s “alt-right.”

Putin’s Power Marketplace
But what the author does do is shed more light on the inner workings of Putin’s power structure and how Russia’s disinformation offensive has developed from that. He argues that it is a conglomerate of clans competing for attention and resources from the center — Putin — in a complex marketplace. With this constantly shifting flow of ideas, perhaps this explains why the Russian leader is often seen as a better tactician than strategist.

Beneath Putin’s inner court Shekhovtsov describes six interconnecting nodes he calls “operators.” These include foreign individuals and groups sympathetic to Russia, as well as local far right activists who network with like-minded counterparts in Europe. Then there are think tanks which promote a Russian perspective on international affairs, loyalist oligarchs, Russia’s diplomatic missions in the West and key players in the ruling United Russia party. And the author shows how these “operators” have worked together to try to influence politics in Austria, Italy and France.

Yet he concludes that the Kremlin has not got much to show for all this effort. Its interventions in the French elections, including assisting and meeting with the National Front leader Marine Le Pen, backfired spectacularly when Emmanuel Macron stormed through to victory.

Moscow may have had some success though more recently in its old hunting ground of Germany — where evidence emerged of concerted Russian intervention behind the scenes — after recent elections there gave the far right a huge boost.

But Putin is stuck with the same problems. Russia still places near the bottom in global favorability indexes. Western sanctions imposed after its invasion of Ukraine remain in place, with the economy stuck in decline. And hopes that Trump’s election would lead to better relations with the US have faded.

But as Shekhovtsov makes clear in this valuable, if not complete book, Russian tactics are constantly evolving, always with one eye on the future. Looking ahead, one concern he highlights is emerging evidence of Russian paramilitary groups giving assistance to the European far-right, encouraging them to take a more violent road. It could turn out to be an even more potent weapon in the Kremlin’s arsenal of disruption.

First published in Coda Story
American Dream
 
Posts: 19946
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:56 pm
Location: Planet Earth
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby Sounder » Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:23 pm

Those poor Russians, first they are bad because they were Communists, now they are bad because they are not Communist.

They learned what a shitty deal Communism is, so now they must pay for their enlightenment.

Anyway people that call people names are often projecting their own guilt in relation to that 'name' away from themselves.
Sounder
 
Posts: 4054
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:49 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby DrEvil » Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:01 pm

Sounder » Sun Aug 12, 2018 4:50 pm wrote:AD wrote....
That's why there should be an Illuminati/Elders subcommittee which rules every publication everywhere with an iron hand. But there isn't!


I think we can take that as a clear vote for social engineering.

So, how does that work where a voice for the 'common people' thinks the common people are too stupid to think for themselves?

Are Eric Schmitt and the Bildabergers the Elders that are qualified to 'finally' bring social justice to a bigot filled world?


To be fair, half of humanity is dumber than the median IQ. :)
"I only read American. I want my fantasy pure." - Dave
User avatar
DrEvil
 
Posts: 3088
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 1:37 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby DrEvil » Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:29 pm

Sounder » Wed Sep 05, 2018 11:23 pm wrote:Those poor Russians, first they are bad because they were Communists, now they are bad because they are not Communist.

They learned what a shitty deal Communism is, so now they must pay for their enlightenment.

Anyway people that call people names are often projecting their own guilt in relation to that 'name' away from themselves.


Enlightenment? They dumped communism and went straight to oligarchy. They jail, kill and/or harass opposition politicians and journalists, they start wars based on false flag attacks, they gas and kill their own people, they knock out other countries' electricity grids in winter, they're fine with wife-beating as long as she doesn't end up in the hospital, and god forbid their kids should be exposed to the gay.

The cognitive dissonance required to hold Russia up as some kind of good guy is mind-boggling.
"I only read American. I want my fantasy pure." - Dave
User avatar
DrEvil
 
Posts: 3088
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 1:37 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby Sounder » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:03 pm

The cognitive dissonance required to hold Russia up as some kind of good guy is mind-boggling.


You do seem to like your western fantasy to be pure Dr. Evil. At any rate this latest anti-Russia push seems nothing more than another tantrum thrown by an imperialist power in decline.

The U.S. is still demanding that Assad leave before any aid or resettlement money is disbursed. Germany sent a minister to Syria to discuss resettlement needs. The U.S. offends ally's and enemies alike and will eventually pay a high price.

Some kind of good guy? Did I say he was a good guy. Good guy or no, I will cheer on Russia and Syria for removing the western inspired cancer intent upon turning a beautiful country into a fundamentalist shithole.
Sounder
 
Posts: 4054
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:49 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Global Research, Chossudovsky, Russia, Propaganda

Postby DrEvil » Wed Sep 05, 2018 11:24 pm

Sounder » Thu Sep 06, 2018 3:03 am wrote:
The cognitive dissonance required to hold Russia up as some kind of good guy is mind-boggling.


You do seem to like your western fantasy to be pure Dr. Evil. At any rate this latest anti-Russia push seems nothing more than another tantrum thrown by an imperialist power in decline.

The U.S. is still demanding that Assad leave before any aid or resettlement money is disbursed. Germany sent a minister to Syria to discuss resettlement needs. The U.S. offends ally's and enemies alike and will eventually pay a high price.

Some kind of good guy? Did I say he was a good guy. Good guy or no, I will cheer on Russia and Syria for removing the western inspired cancer intent upon turning a beautiful country into a fundamentalist shithole.


There you go again with your binary nonsense. Let me spell it out for you with really simple words:

Russia sucks. The United States sucks. China sucks. The UK sucks. All empires suck.

And do you seriously think Russia is helping Syria out of the goodness of their hearts? How naive can you possibly get?
It's geopolitics, propaganda and advertisement for Russian weapon systems. It's the same shit the US always pulls, so thanks but no thanks, I will not be cheering when two authoritarian psychopaths bomb yet another city to rubble.
"I only read American. I want my fantasy pure." - Dave
User avatar
DrEvil
 
Posts: 3088
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 1:37 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

PreviousNext

Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 17 guests